KGOU
laptop with Oklahoma State Election Board website
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

State Election Board Says Potential Cyberattacks Not Affecting Oklahoma

Oklahoma election officials aren’t worried about a security breach after Yahoo! News broke a story indicating foreign hackers tapped into Arizona and Illinois online voter registration systems this summer. The State Election Board says it hasn’t been contacted by the federal government about security issues after the FBI raised concerns about the security of state election systems. The FBI’s Cyber Division issued a “flash” alert saying hackers could disrupt November’s elections. Earlier this...
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Tom Kilpatrick, founder of CloudDeck Media and the Oklahoma Aviation testing center, pilots a drone.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Regulatory changes mean flying a drone is about to become a lot easier. Testing centers are scheduling their first exams as new rules take effect Monday.

student in a classroom using a laptop computer
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Black and Hispanic students are much less likely to be identified as “gifted” than their white and Asian counterparts — a disparity found in Oklahoma that mirrors national statistics on gifted and talented education.

In Oklahoma, black students make up 9 percent of all students but 4.5 percent of students in gifted and talented programs. Similarly, Hispanic students comprise 16 percent of all students but 10 percent of students classified as gifted and talented.

August 28, 2016

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

It is time to recognize our students at KGOU for the fall semester.

Taking Practicum this semester are Ethan Barton and David Ransom. These two will be working on a variety of items behind the scenes – editing audio, preparing promotional announcements, and making sure the operations go smoothly.

A security official stands guard ahead of a men's preliminary volleyball match between Cuba and Iran at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016.
Matt Rourke / AP

In the years since its selection as the site of the 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro has drawn strong opinions both domestically and abroad about the sustainability and feasibility of the global sporting event.

Workers construct new homes at 12th Avenue NW and Tecumseh Road in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

National figures out this week from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development showed sales of new single-family homes rose more than 12 percent between June and July.

The seasonally adjusted annual rate of 654,000 units is the highest since October 2007 -  right around the time the housing bubble burst. But home construction is showing in the U.S., according to the National Association of Home Builders.

Donald Trump at a campaign stop at the Oklahoma State Fair in September 2015.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Donald Trump is wooing energy-state voters by promising a presidency that will champion coal, promote drilling and free frackers from federal regulations limiting oil and gas development.

If the Republican candidate’s energy platform sounds like it was written specifically for fossil fuel companies, that’s because an Oklahoma oil billionaire helped craft it.

Donald Trump delivered his first major speech on U.S. energy policy at a petroleum conference in the capital city of one the country’s most oil-rich states, Bismark, North Dakota.

Cattle are moved after auction at the Oklahoma City Stockyards.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association is still struggling to find support for a statewide marketing program.

Ranchers and other agriculture producers have been very active in their collective support of State Question 777, which would amend the state constitution to stringently limit lawmakers’ ability to regulate the industry.

Gary Matli, a field inspector supervisor for the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, checks on a Craig Elder Oil and Gas disposal well located east of Guthrie, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The oil and gas industry practice of pumping waste fluid into disposal wells is likely responsible for Oklahoma’s exponential surge in earthquake activity.

An elections clerk cuts from a strip of "I voted" stickers at a polling place in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma voters now have clarity about candidates for all state legislative races following yesterday’s primary runoff elections.

Air force veteran Adam Pugh defeated pastor and retired professional football player Paul Blair in the runoff contest for state Senate seat 41, which includes Edmond. The seat is currently held by term-limited state Sen. Clark Jolley, the chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Monta Johnson, a fifth-grade teacher at Adams Elementary School, passes out books to her class in Oklahoma City on August 3, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City Public School Board members approved a $180 million bond proposal at a special board meeting on Tuesday. The bond will not increase taxes, and instead extends a bond that is set to expire.

Superintendent Aurora Lora said Oklahoma City Public Schools has dire basic needs throughout the district, and the new bond will address transportation, technology, and building maintenance issues.

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