Tony Webster / Flickr

Police Use Of Force Incidents On The Rise In Oklahoma City

Oklahoma leads the nation in the number of police killings per capita so far this year, according to an analysis by The Guardian. Oklahoma City police have been a part of seven fatal officer-involved shootings, which is more than any other department in the state in 2015. Officers from the police department in Tulsa -- the state’s second largest city -- haven’t shot and killed anyone in 2015, despite a higher violent crime rate. But Oklahoma City Police Captain Paco Balderrama isn’t surprised...
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EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks to reporters while on a farm tour in Rocheport, Mo., in 2014.
Kris Husted / Harvest Public Media

Some of the nation’s largest farm groups are cheering after a federal judge blocked implementation Thursday of new rules governing water pollution.

U.S. District Judge Ralph Erickson issued a preliminary injunction delaying the rules, which had been set to take effect Friday, saying that the Environmental Protection Agency had overstepped its bounds. Thirteen states sued the agency, seeking to prevent implementation, and Erickson said the “states are likely to succeed in their claim.”

Ryan LaCroix / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has instructed a judge to implement a ruling that a Ten Commandments monument on the state Capitol grounds is unconstitutional and must be removed. 

The state's highest court issued the mandate Thursday to carry out its June 30 decision that the monument is a religious symbol and must be removed because it violates a state constitutional ban on using public property to benefit a religion. The 7-2 ruling was reaffirmed last month when the court denied a rehearing sought by Attorney General Scott Pruitt.

The Grand River Dam Authority's coal-fired plant in Chouteau, Okla., which is impacted by the Regional Haze Rule.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

President Obama’s Clean Power Plan enraged many top officials in Oklahoma, who argued the rules were an expensive, unnecessary overreach by the federal government.

But the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions could create opportunities in Oklahoma, researchers and officials say.


The scene in front of clinics where abortions are performed is often tense, with clinic workers escorting patients past activists waving signs and taking photographs.

But increasingly, another drama is unfolding out back. There, abortion opponents dig through the trash in search of patient information.

Alberto G. / Flickr

The percentage of Oklahoma’s graduating seniors who are ready for college of a career hasn’t changed since last year, according to ACT testing benchmarks.

The testing organization’s annual Condition of College and Career Readiness report released Wednesday shows the number of 2015 high school graduates who met benchmarks in each of the four subject areas – English, reading, math, and science – remained at 22 percent.

Christian Costello at the Oklahoma County Jail Monday after his Sunday arrest for the stabbing death of his father, Labor Commissioner Mark Costello.
Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office

Oklahoma City police investigators believe the deadly stabbing of a prominent politician by his son was a premeditated attack and that the suspect intentionally separated his father and mother before the assault took place. 

Those details were disclosed in a police affidavit filed Wednesday as part of a request for a search warrant for a condominium where 26-year-old Christian Costello lived. Costello has been jailed on a preliminary charge of first-degree murder for the Sunday night stabbing death of his father, Oklahoma Labor Commissioner Mark Costello.

(This post was last updated at 3:43 p.m. ET.)

Two journalists for Virginia TV news station WDBJ were killed by a gunman Wednesday morning while they were broadcasting live at a waterfront shopping center about an hour southeast of Roanoke, Va.

Reporter Alison Parker and photojournalist Adam Ward were doing a live report from Bridgewater Plaza in Moneta when a gunman opened fire, killing Parker and Ward and injuring Vicki Gardner, the head of a local Chamber of Commerce who was being interviewed. Gardner is now in stable condition, hospital officials say.

(L-R): Oklahoma Watch executive editor David Fritze, Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr., and Oklahoma City police chief Bill Citty during Tuesday night's forum at Kamp's 1910 Café.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

Oklahoma City residents crowded into a café in Midtown Tuesday night to discuss police and minority communities.

The event hosted by Oklahoma Watch raised questions about diversity within the police force.

Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr. spoke to the crowd about everything from the nationwide spike in police shootings to the racial makeup of the city’s police force, where the number of black officers stands at roughly 6 percent. Pettis voiced concerns that number would drop even lower in coming years as minority officers begin to retire.

Michael Lockhoff plays with his daughter in their backyard in Tulsa. The Lockhoffs struggled last year, when she was 6, to work with schools to meet their child's educational and emotional needs.
Nate Robson / Oklahoma Watch

An Oklahoma Watch investigation finds that across the state, special education students are being paddled, suspended and expelled at higher rates than those of other students.

Students with physical and mental disabilities in Oklahoma are bearing much of the brunt of classroom discipline, government data show.

They're more likely than their peers to be suspended, expelled, arrested, handcuffed or paddled.

Crooks and criminals in America's farm country are turning to an old crime — cattle rustling. The high price for beef and substance abuse are behind the surge in livestock theft, and that's putting some ranchers on edge.

At Susan Edmondson's farm near Henryetta, Okla., cattle started disappearing one by one last fall. At first she thought they had just wandered off. But over the winter, more and more went away, until she had lost 12 cows and 16 calves.

The culprits: teenage cattle thieves. Edmonson knew them well.

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