Tulsa County Sheriff's reserve deputy Robert Bates enters the Tulsa County Jail Tuesday.
Matt Trotter / KWGS Public Radio Tulsa

Oklahoma State Bureau Of Investigation Opens Probe Into Tulsa County Sheriff's Office

The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation announced Monday morning it's opened an investigation into allegations of misconduct in the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office. The move comes nearly two months after the shooting of a restrained suspect by a volunteer deputy. Eric Harris died when Robert Bates shot him after reportedly confusing his service revolver with his stun gun. The OSBI said in a news release that was also posted on social media it formally opened the investigation Friday after it...
Read More

On Now

30-day rainfall totals from Oklahoma Mesonet stations as of May 31, 2015.
Oklahoma Mesonet

No surprise here - May went down as the wettest month in Oklahoma history.

The final statewide average rainfall for May was 14.4 inches. State climatologist Gary McManus said that's nearly 9.6 inches above normal, and obliterated the 74-year-old previous record of 10.75 inches set in October 1941. The Oklahoma Climatological Survey has kept records since the 1890s.

We've come a long way since 1975, when a newspaper in Midland, Texas, featured an advertisement about a personal pocket computer wizard that had the broad mathematical abilities of a slide rule: a Sharp calculator.

But, are we smarter now that technology has put a lot more than a slide rule into our pockets? Or are we so dependent on technology to do things for us that we are losing the ability to make our own magic, mentally, socially and politically?

Verna Morales, left, and her daughter, Aliah Morales, sit in front of their old transitional apartment at Pearl’s Hope, a homeless shelter in Tulsa.  Aliah Morales has been homeless for three years and her mother has been homeless for six years. The two c
Nate Robson / Oklahoma Watch

A resilient economy and low unemployment have done little to stem the tide of students who are finding themselves homeless in Oklahoma.

Despite a five-year oil and gas boom and falling jobless rates, growing numbers of youths are finding themselves without a bedroom to call their own – a trend seen across the nation.

Oklahoma Capitol Building
ana branca / Flickr Creative Commons

Bond rating agencies will not be fond of Oklahoma’s fiscal year 2016 budget, State Bond Advisor Jim Joseph told the Council on Bond Oversight.

“This budget will not be something the rating agencies will like because of the way is was balanced with one time money,” Joseph said Thursday during a meeting of the council.

 

Joseph pointed out the budget uses a variety of one-time funding sources, including $150 million from the Constitutional Reserve or Rainy Day Fund and $125.2 million from agency revolving fund accounts.

 

First Place Awards for StateImpact Oklahoma from the Oklahoma Chapter of the Society for Professional Jouranlists 2015
KGOU

May 31, 2015

This is from the Manager’s Desk.   

In its four-year history, StateImpact Oklahoma has received many awards and this last year is no exception.

In the RTDNA Murrow Awards for Region 6, StateImpact was recognized for stories about the relationship of earthquakes to disposal wells.

The Oklahoma Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists presented nine awards to StateImpact.

American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

After Governor Mary Fallin signed legislation authorizing a $25 million bond issue to finish the incomplete American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City, the Native American Cultural and Educational Authority’s board meeting celebrated the event.

Flooding along 36th Ave. NW and Telephone Road between Indian Hills Road and SW 34th Street at the border between Norman and Moore.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Governor Mary Fallin is asking the Federal Emergency Management Agency for federal funding to help repair damage in 16 counties caused by recent tornadoes and flooding.

Fallin said in a news release Friday that the request is to help municipalities, counties and rural electric cooperatives with infrastructure repairs, debris removal and costs associated with responding to the storms that began May 5.

Officials are warning of more rain this weekend in Texas and Oklahoma, compounding severe flooding in the region that began last weekend and has been blamed for the deaths of at least 28 people.

Forecasters warn that the Colorado River at Wharton, Texas, could crest today, causing major flooding in that area. It is the wettest May on record for the state.

Meanwhile, volunteers searched the banks of the Blanco River in Central Texas, searching for people missing days after a vacation house was swept away, according to The Associated Press.

U.S Drought Monitor as of May 29, 2015
U.S. Drought Monitor

Given the choice between the crippling drought of the past nearly 5 years and the ongoing threat of flooding Oklahoma farmers and ranchers are currently dealing with, Chris Kirby with the Oklahoma Wheat Commission says she’ll take the rain every time.

“I’ve heard some people say, ‘well, I don’t want to complain about the rain, because the last time I did, it quit raining for six years,” Kirby tells StateImpact.

Chancellor for Higher Education Glen Johnson
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education approved a variety of measures during a meeting Friday with little discussion.

Among those measures was the approval of $963.4 million in state appropriations allocated by the state legislature and expected to be approved by Governor Mary Fallin.

The proposed appropriation total would represent a 2.4 percent cut from higher education's previous fiscal year.

Considering most state agencies saw larger percentage cuts, Chancellor Glen Johnson said he is thankful for what they were received.

Pages