People gather for the Fiesta de las Americas in Oklahoma City on Oct. 1, 2016.
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged

How New Residents Have Changed The Business, Voter Makeup In South Oklahoma City

Pete White drives slowly through his old neighborhood in south Oklahoma City. The 78-year-old Oklahoma City councilman has lived in the area his entire life. “This is the house I grew up in right here,” White said as he drove through a tree lined neighborhood of modest homes. He pulled onto Southwest 25th Street in the business district of an area known as Capitol Hill. White pointed out the location of former businesses. Department stores, a doctor’s office, and pharmacies. All of them are...
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Video Breakdown: State Question 779

Oct 17, 2016

As KGOU and KOSU began crafting ideas for our collaborative election project Oklahoma Engaged, we were interested in several forms of storytelling. This included informative and in-depth radio stories and video profiles of folks in a south Oklahoma City district.

Remembering Chickasaw Tribal Elder Jerry Imotichey

Oct 17, 2016

Earlier this month Here & Now visited the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma — a center not only for culture and history, but also the preservation and revitalization of the critically endangered Chickasaw language.

Among the 30 or so remaining native speakers we met was Jerry Imotichey. He grew up speaking Chickasaw, and called the language and culture his “soul.”

People hold signs at a "protest for justice" over the Sept. 16, 2016 shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma. The rally took place in Tulsa on Sept. 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

The Tulsa Police Department paid more than $216,000 in overtime in the immediate aftermath of the September 16 fatal shooting of an unarmed black man by a white officer.

The expenses covered increased staffing of patrols for demonstrations, marches, the funeral and news conferences after Officer Betty Shelby shot and killed Terence Crutcher.

State Sen. Ervin Yen, R-Oklahoma City, on the Senate floor Tuesday, May 17, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

State Sen. Ervin Yen, R-Oklahoma City, plans to explore vaccination issues during the 2017 legislative session.

In an interview Friday morning, the Oklahoma City Republican told eCapitol’s Tyler Talley vaccination rates have plummeted over the last decade, and he said it’s his duty as a physician to advocate for vaccinations:

He explained that there was once a 95 percent Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccination rate among kindergartners in Oklahoma.

Bob Nance and Gary Watts, attorneys for eight Oklahoma school districts that successfully sued to have the Oklahoma Tax Commission change how it calculates motor vehicle tax disbursement.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

A group of school districts won a case Friday against the Oklahoma Tax Commission, and it could change how millions of dollars are distributed.

Oklahoma schools get a chunk of every vehicle registration and excise tax paid to the state. Last year, lawmakers changed the formula and the Oklahoma Tax Commission had to interpret how to divide those motor vehicle taxes.

Leah Thompson Carter, of Bartlesville, lost her son to a prescription drug overdose and is afraid she will lose another. Here, she speaks at the Suicide Awareness Summit in Bartlesville in September.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

For many Oklahomans, the tug of war between drug addiction and the wait time for treatment can be a one-sided competition: The power of addiction often wins.

Those who lack insurance or cannot pay out of pocket often find themselves on a long waiting list that prioritizes the most severe drug addiction cases. If the person isn’t pregnant or injecting drugs, he or she will not receive state-funded treatment or will be forced to wait, sometimes weeks, until a spot opens up.


The Norman Police Department is interested in buying a 20-foot-long, 17,000-pound armored vehicle.

It's called the Bearcat, which stands for "ballistic engineered armored response counter attack truck," but city says it expects to use it primarily during natural disasters.

Activists of the anti-establishment 5 Star Movement gather in front of the ancient Colosseum in Rome, Sunday, April 21, 2013.
Gregorio Borgia / AP

In an election cycle fraught with uncertainty, inflammatory rhetoric and vicious partisanship, it can be easy for Americans to forget about the political spheres outside the United States. While parliamentary systems are often similarly constrained by deep party divides, some new players have entered the field to shake up European domestic politics.

A road sign informs motorists of the closure of the intersection of Reno Avenue and E.K. Gaylord Boulevard in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

If you’ve been to downtown Oklahoma City in the past year, you’ve probably had to weave your way around concrete barriers, dodge traffic cones, and been yelled at by your GPS due to a significant amount of construction at the base of tall office buildings.

A lot of that is part of Oklahoma City’s Project 180, which grew out of tax increment financing that helped build Devon Tower.

Attendees listen as former Missouri state senator Wes Shoemyer speaks against Amendment 1 at the Missouri’s Food for America sign-making event at Café Berlin Friday, June 27, 2014 in Columbia, Missouri.
KOMUNews / Flickr

Oklahoma could become the third state to add a “right-to-farm” amendment to its constitution if voters approve State Question 777 this November. Voters in North Dakota and Missouri already adopted such a measure, but, the effects remain unclear there, even years after passage.