A-F Report Cards
2:38 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Oklahoma Department Of Education Releases A-F School Grades

Credit comedy_nose / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma State Board of Education has voted unanimously to release newly-revised letter-grade report cards for public schools and districts in the state.

The board voted 5-0 Wednesday during a special meeting following a report by State Department of Education officials.

The grades show 354 schools received an A grade, 499 got a B, 472 received a C, 263 got a D, and 163 received an F.

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Around The State
1:39 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

PSO Sues Railroad To Force Sale Of Land In Tulsa

Credit LImeBye / Flickr Creative Commons

Public Service Company of Oklahoma has filed an eminent domain lawsuit against Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad in an effort to force the railroad to sell property in Tulsa to the electric utility.

PSO says the half-acre plot in the northwestern area of downtown Tulsa is needed for an electric substation to meet future electricity demands of the area. The utility says it's contacted BNSF in an effort to buy the land, but BNSF has refused to sell.

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Shots - Health News
12:46 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Babies' Immune Systems May Stand Down To Let Good Microbes Grow

He's not just getting a cold. He's building his microbiome.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 2:27 pm

Here's possible solace for parents who are up at night with a baby who gets sick all the time: There appears to be a good reason why infant immune systems don't fight off germs.

A newborn's immune system is deliberately not doing battle with every germ that comes along so that "good" microbes have a chance to settle in, researchers say. That explanation is at odds with the widely held belief that those new immune systems are just too weak to do the job.

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Shots - Health News
9:15 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Administration Looks To Give Labor Unions Health Tax Relief

Union member Tom Stensberg holds a sign thanking Congress for the Affordable Care Act during a rally hosted by the AFL-CIO at the U.S. Capitol in May 2010.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 8:17 am

Weeks after denying labor's request to give union members access to health law subsidies, the Obama administration is signaling it intends to exempt some union plans from one of the law's substantial taxes.

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The Two-Way
9:02 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Astrodoomed? Famed Houston Stadium May Fall To Wrecking Ball

An interior shot of the Houston Astrodome taken in 1990. The stadium was "the first fully air-conditioned, enclosed, domed, multipurpose sports stadium in the world," according to the Texas Historical Association.
Tony Duffy Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 12:46 pm

Voters in Houston on Tuesday rejected a bond referendum that would have allowed Harris County, Texas, to borrow $217 million that it could then spend on turning the Astrodome into one very large convention and exhibition hall.

The vote was 53 percent against the referendum, to 47 percent in favor.

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Earthquakes
8:44 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Trying Again: Oklahoma Lawmaker Seeks Better Earthquake Insurance Info

State Rep. Mike Shelton (D-Oklahoma City)
Credit Oklahoma House

Following a rash of earthquakes, a state lawmaker says he plans to file a bill to require insurance companies to notify Oklahomans whether their policies cover property damage caused by earthquakes.

Rep. Mike Shelton of Oklahoma City filed a bill last year that would have required insurance companies to notify Oklahomans who are purchasing or renewing an insurance policy whether the policy covers losses caused by earthquakes. Shelton says the measure was opposed by the insurance industry and died in a House committee.

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The Two-Way
8:16 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Soaring Personnel Costs Threaten Readiness, Hagel Warns

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 7:57 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel talks with NPR's Steve Inskeep

Health care and retirement costs that already account for a large part of the U.S. military's budget and are on a path to go even higher could leave the nation with "a military that's heavily compensated, but probably a force that's not capable and not ready," Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel tells NPR.

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Native American
8:07 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Veronica's Parents Seek Legal Fees From Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma Dad

Dusten Brown with his daughter, Veronica, before her return to her adoptive parents in South Carolina.
Credit Cherokee Nation

Attorneys for the adoptive parents of a 4-year-old girl caught up in a custody dispute are seeking $1 million in legal fees from the Cherokee Nation and the girl's biological father, who is a member of the tribe.

Attorneys representing Matt and Melanie Capobianco have filed paperwork seeking the legal fees incurred while fighting the lengthy custody battle over 4-year-old Veronica.

In September, Dusten Brown handed Veronica over to the Capobiancos after the Oklahoma Supreme Court lifted an emergency stay keeping the girl in Oklahoma.

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NPR News Investigations
8:00 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Secret Persuasion: How Big Campaign Donors Stay Anonymous

A composite image shows part of the NPR/Center for Responsive Politics reporting team's whiteboard at NPR headquarters that was used to map out how Wellspring connects to other social welfare groups. (Click the enlarge button to see a full-size image.)
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:48 pm

Part two of our "Secret Persuasion" story reported with the Center for Responsive Politics. Read the first part here.

As tax-exempt organizations become a vehicle of choice for big political donors, one powerful appeal is the anonymity. Federal laws allow tax-exempt groups — unlike political committees — to withhold their donor lists from disclosure.

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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Your Election News In Five Headlines

Democrat Terry McAuliffe, who won a close election Tuesday to become Virginia's next governor, hugged wife Dorothy at the campaign's victory celebration in Tysons Corner, Va.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 9:57 am

  • From the NPR Newscast: A roundup of election results

Here's a cheat sheet about Tuesday's elections, starting with the most surprising news:

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