Co-founder of Chesapeake and SandRidge
6:19 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Former CEO Starts New Energy Company

Tom Ward
Credit snu.edu

The former CEO of SandRidge Energy Inc. and co-founder of Chesapeake Energy Corp. has started a new Oklahoma City energy company.

The Oklahoman reports that Tom Ward's new company, Tapstone Energy LLC, has leased space in an office building downtown. Ward says the company has "a handful of employees" and is looking for more employees and oil and gas properties.

Ward says he is funding the new company himself for now, but that he might consider bringing on other investors.

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Parents May Not Meet Income Requirements
4:58 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Student Numbers In Oklahoma Promise Scholarship Program Declines

Credit UGL_UIUC / Flickr.com

Oklahoma officials say the number of students enrolling in the Oklahoma Promise scholarship program continues to decline.

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education expect 18,300 students to enroll in the program during the 2014-2015 school year. According to The Oklahoman, that's a 5.2 decrease from the current year's enrollment.

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Here & Now
4:55 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Former Republican Congressman: Dysfunction In Washington Is 'Systemic'

A view of the U.S. Capitol building on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013 in Washington. (AP/ Evan Vucci)

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 2:51 pm

Mickey Edwards represented Oklahoma’s 5th district for 16 years in Congress. Edwards says the dysfunction in Washington is a “systemic problem,” and can’t be cured until the power of political parties diminishes.

Edwards told Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson that the last impasse in Washington is a result of how the political parties, both the Democrats and the Republicans, operate.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:41 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Why The Greenhouse Gas Argument SCOTUS Will Hear Matters to Oklahoma

The Supreme Court of the United States in Washington, D.C.
Credit Christopher Elliott / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to review six petitions relating to the federal government’s regulation of greenhouse gasses.

But the high court consolidated the cases, and will only review a single question that pertains to all of them.

SCOTUSBlog’s Lyle Denniston reports:

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Former House Speaker Tom Foley Dies At 84

House Speaker Tom Foley (back, right) and Vice President Al Gore applaud during President Bill Clinton's State of the Union address on Jan. 24, 1994.
Ron Edmonds AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:20 pm

Former House Speaker Tom Foley, who led the chamber from 1989 to 1995, has died, according to his family. He was 84.

The Associated Press says Foley's wife, Heather, confirmed that the Washington state Democrat died at his Washington, D.C., home.

He had reportedly been in ill health in recent months.

The AP says:

"Foley became the first speaker since the Civil War to fail to win re-election in his home district.

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World Views
10:48 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR’s Kelly McEvers Drafts History, Documents Her Own Story In Syria

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews a U.S. soldier in the Middle East.
Glen Carey

Listen to the October 18, 2013 episode, with Suzette Grillot's conversation with NPR correspondent Kelly McEvers.

Kelly McEvers spent three years based in Baghdad and Beirut covering the Middle East for NPR. She started her assignment with instructions not to miss a day in Iraq as the 2011 U.S. troop withdrawal deadline approached.

“Then in late 2010, a guy set himself on fire in Tunisia, and everything changed,” McEvers told KGOU’s World Views host Suzette Grillot. “I was swept up with millions of other people in this thing called the Arab Spring.”

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This is KGOU
8:34 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Life-Long Learning – At Home And Around The World

Credit Jeffrey Beall / Flickr Creative Commons

At 27, I’m one of the younger members of the KGOU staff. I started my career in public radio at KGOU at 19, while still very much a naïve college student. Working on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, sometimes it feels like I never left college.

Fortunately, if you never leave higher education, you never stop learning. Public radio stimulates my curiosity, and teaches me something new every single day. In this 21st Century fast-paced digital landscape, a conversation that once opened with “I heard it on KGOU…” has been replaced with a text message that usually starts with “TIL” (for “Today I Learned…”).

That thirst for knowledge is quenched every day by what I hear on KGOU. 

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Chesapeake
8:08 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Fort Worth Joins Lawsuit Against OKC's Chesapeake Energy

The corporate campus of Chesapeake Energy in Oklahoma City.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Fort Worth and several other individuals and cities have sued Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake Energy claiming the company underpaid natural gas royalties.

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports Friday the lawsuit was filed in a Tarrant County district court.

The newspaper says the lawsuit filed Thursday claims Chesapeake improperly deducted production services and sold natural gas to its affiliates under market price. The lawsuit says that as a result Fort Worth, Arlington and others were underpaid royalties.

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The Two-Way
7:32 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Can GOP, Democrats Come Together On A Budget By Dec. 13?

Members of the bipartisan budget conference (from left): Sen. Jeff Sessions, Rep. Paul Ryan, Sen. Patty Murray and Rep. Chris Van Hollen. Can they reach a deal by Dec. 13?
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:46 am

Now that the government has reopened, attention turns to the next phase of the spending fight, a battle that is far from over.

The bill that President Obama signed early Thursday provides only a temporary respite to the partisan tussles that have perennially plagued the budget process. The government stays open through Jan. 15 and the federal borrowing authority is safe until Feb. 7. After that, all bets are off.

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7:26 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Study: As Few As Three Test Responses Separate A From F Schools In Oklahoma

Lead in text: 
Oklahoma's transition to an A-to-F grading system for its public schools continues to receive criticism. A study from researchers at Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma indicates the new school accountability program also hides poor academic performance by low-income and minority students.
As few as three correct responses on Oklahoma state tests can separate those schools receiving an A grade from those receiving an F under the state's accountability system, according to a paper released by the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University this month that says the system has many flaws, among them that it hides the poor performance of racial minorities and low-income students.

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