The Two-Way
8:17 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Strike On Syria: Meaningless Gesture Or Necessary Response?

Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., called military action in Syria legitimate and necessary.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:09 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power
  • From 'Morning Edition': Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla.
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Bowman

The arguments for and against taking military action against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad for its alleged use of chemical weapons against civilians were laid out Monday on Morning Edition.

Making the case for a "legitimate, necessary and proportional response" was Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

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Theatre
6:52 am
Mon September 9, 2013

It's A Witch's Night Off For Oklahomans In Wicked Cast

Joel Ingram and Jillian Kates

The touring cast of the Broadway show, Wicked, is performing in Oklahoma City through Sept. 22. But Monday night the cast won’t be performing the music from the blockbuster musical, instead the audience will see and hear a revue of some of the performers’ favorite songs and set pieces presented for a good cause.

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Environment
8:46 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors

A white snowshoe hare against a brown background makes the animal easy prey.
L.S. Mills Research Photo

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 12:40 pm

The effects of climate change often happen on a large scale, like drought or a rise in sea level. In the hills outside Missoula, Mont., wildlife biologists are looking at a change to something very small: the snowshoe hare.

Life as snowshoe hare is pretty stressful. For one, almost everything in the forest wants to eat you.

Alex Kumar, a graduate student at the University of Montana, lists the animals that are hungry for hares.

"Lynx, foxes, coyotes, raptors, birds of prey. Interestingly enough, young hares, their main predator is actually red squirrels."

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Science
8:41 am
Sun September 8, 2013

'Memory Pinball' And Other Reasons You Need A Nap

On the surface, sleep may seem like an evolutionary disaster, but its benefits have come to outweigh its potential downsides.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 12:40 pm

We spend about one-third of our lives sleeping, but much of that function remains a mystery. Weekend Edition Sunday is asking some pretty fundamental, yet complicated, questions about why we do it and why we can't seem to get more of it.

Dr. Matthew Walker says the question of why we sleep remains "that archetypal mystery."

Walker, the principal investigator at the sleep lab the University of California, Berkeley, works with patients who suffer from sleep abnormalities. He says the complexity of sleep makes the research that much more fascinating.

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Indian Times
8:40 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Tourism In Indian Country Unlikely Key To Preserving Culture

American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association
Credit AIANTA

Tourism in Indian Country…what does that bring to mind?  White tourists looking at baubles, bangles and bright shiny beads?  The American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association, or AIANTA, thinks it’s so much more than that.  The organization was formed in 1993 to help tribes recognize that cultural tourism could help preserve traditions.

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Mumford & Sons
5:30 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Guthrie's Population To Explode This Weekend

Mumford & Sons
Credit HarshLight / Creative Commons

The population of the Oklahoma town of Guthrie is expected to quadruple this weekend as more than 35,000 people come to watch British folk rock band Mumford & Sons.

The former capital of Oklahoma is one of three U.S. stops on Mumford & Sons' Gentlemen of the Road concert series. The others are Troy, Ohio, and St. Augustine, Fla.

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World Views
4:25 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Understanding Issues Of Land And Wealth For Indigenous Guatemalans

A Kakchiquel family in the hamlet of Patzutzun, Guatemala.
Credit John Isaac / UN Photo

Listen to Suzette Grillot's Conversation with Francisco Calí.

In 1996, Guatemala ended a 36-year civil war that devastated the country’s indigenous community. Seventeen years later, indigenous people in the Central American country are still seeking justice after the decades-long conflict.

“They agreed to sign not only a peace agreement, but also an amnesty law which says that all those people who committed human rights violations will not be prosecuted legally,” says Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

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World Views
2:05 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

India Gang Rape Puts Spotlight On Broader Worldwide Sexual Violence

Protesters at India Gate in Delhi demanding the government to take action after the gang rape - Dec. 21, 2012.
Credit Ramesh Lalwani / Flickr Creative Commons

A fast-track court will give a verdict next week in the trial of four men accused in the gang rape and fatal beating of a woman on a New Delhi bus last year.

The assault caused nationwide outrage and forced the government to change rape laws and create fast-track courts for rape cases.

University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Dean Suzette Grillot says even though there’s outrage over the increasingly-common attacks against women, there’s not enough push to have an impact on the sentences these young men receive.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:35 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Moore Building Code Changes Likely To Focus On Homes, Not Businesses

An open sign is one of the few items left after a tornado struck this convenient store in Moore, OK.
Credit State Farm / Flickr Creative Commons

When the massive EF5 tornado ripped through Moore on May 20, it took out homes and business alike. Since then, the Moore City Council has been considering updating building codes to make homes safer. But as the Journal Record‘s Molly M. Flemming reports, the city’s construction standards for commercial buildings aren’t being altered much:

Those codes are likely to stay the same, with one slight change.

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State Capitol
12:13 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Feds Plan To Continue Insure Oklahoma

Oklahoma Health Care Authority CEO Nico Gomez speaks in the Blue Room of the State Capitol while Gov. Mary Fallin and Secretary of Health and Human Services Terry Cline look on.
Credit Kurt Gwartney / KGOU

The federal government will let the state continue to operate its Insure Oklahoma program while it considers expanding Medicaid and taking a greater amount of federal money to insure the poor.

Gov. Mary Fallin announced Friday morning that the waiver for Insure Oklahoma would be for one year.

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