Middle East
8:06 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Palestinian Refugees On Losing Side Of UN Budget Crunch

Palestinian refugee Lawahez Burghal stuffs tripe with rice and garbanzo beans for her family in their home in the Amari refugee camp in the West Bank. Many refugees still depend on the United Nations for food, health care and education.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 7:17 am

The United Nations agency that provides basic health care and education to Palestinian refugees doesn't have enough money to pay local salaries this month.

The shortfall could directly affect 30,000 teachers, doctors and social workers, as well as the people using their services in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and the Palestinian territories.

Filling Basic Needs

Sit for an hour in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency office in the al-Amari camp for Palestinian refugees, and you get a sense of what people expect the agency to provide.

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Parallels
7:59 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Five Things You May Not Know About Child Marriage

Arinafe Makwiti, 13, says her parents forced her to drop out of school and get married to an older man last year to help with the family finances. Makwiti has divorced her husband, but now has a 9-month-old daughter.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 9:40 am

NPR's Jennifer Ludden recently traveled to the African nation of Malawi, one of many countries in the developing world where child marriage remains prevalent. She found girls like Christina Asima, who was married at 12 and became a mother at 13. She is now divorced and caring for her infant son on her own. You can read Jennifer's full report here. Below are a few more things she learned while reporting on child marriage.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:55 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Be THANKful For This Puzzle

NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:49 pm

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is a game of categories based on the word "thank," in honor of Thanksgiving weekend. For each category, name something beginning with each of the letters T, H, A, N and K. For example, if the category were "U.S. States," you might say Tennessee, Hawaii, Alaska, Nevada and Kentucky.

Last week's challenge: Name a tree whose letters can be rearranged to spell two herbs or spices. Hint: The tree has a two-word name. What tree is it, and what are the herbs or spices?

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Indian Times
8:10 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Chickasaw Nation Makes Generous Donation To OU Law School

OU Law School Dean Joe Harroz
Credit Susan Shannon

A generous gift from the Chickasaw Nation to University of Oklahoma’s Law School has created the nation’s first American Indian Law Scholar endowed chair.

Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s Law School, Joe Harroz, sees this gift from the Chickasaws as proof that his program is headed in the right direction.

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Protective Order Filed
6:21 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Missing Oklahoma Family Threatened By Own Father

Credit Mindi and Marty / Flickr.com

A petition for a protective order indicates members of a missing Oklahoma family were threatened with violence by one of their closest relatives less than six months before they vanished.

Bobby Jamison, his wife, Sherilyn, and daughter, Madyson, went missing in October 2009, roughly six months after the petition was filed in McIntosh County. The remains of three human beings, described as a child and two adults, were found Nov. 16 in northeast Latimer County.

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Illegal Internet Gambling
5:46 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Chase Burns Sentencing Delayed

Credit Sean and Lauren / Flickr.com

Sentencing has been delayed for an Anadarko man accused in Florida of connections to an illegal Internet cafe gambling ring that led to the ban of the cafes in Florida and the resignation of that state's lieutenant governor.

Chase Burns still faces criminal charges in Seminole County, Fla., where court records show sentencing initially scheduled for December has been postponed until Feb. 12. The 38-year-old reached a deal earlier this month with Oklahoma's attorney general to forfeit $3.5 million to the state.

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World Views
3:34 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Breaking Down India’s Caste System Through Education

LaNelma Johnson stands with villagers in Panchgani, India
Provided LaNelma Johnson

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with LaNelma Johnson.

Forty-five years ago, LaNelma and Ray Johnson accepted the Bahá’í faith, and its tenet to serve humanity and the oneness of mankind. That desire took them to India in 1971, where they taught children ages five to 18 at a small, rural school in Panchgani.

“Some of the children were there because they were orphans, and some were there because they came from war-torn countries,” LaNelma Johnson says. “We really felt like we could do a service there with these children.”

Johnson told the story of her family’s 12 years in India in her memoir Okie in a Saree. The couple set out to consciously recruit female students from all over India, since they weren’t afforded the same educational opportunities as boys. India’s caste system had already been illegal for decades, but reforms were slow to trickle down to rural villages.

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History
2:43 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

'Thanks' To The Woman Who Helped Make A November Thursday Special

This portrait of Sarah Josepha Hale, painted by James Reid Lambdin, hangs in Newport, N.H., where she was born.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 5:39 pm

Thursday's holiday has Sarah Josepha Hale to thank for helping it get national recognition.

Thanksgiving before 1863 was something of a moveable feast, with states honoring the holiday at various times or not at all. But as the Civil War dragged on, Abraham Lincoln needed a way to unite the country. And Hale, a prominent magazine editor, persuaded him to declare a national holiday.

Hale, who was from New Hampshire, was a prolific writer of biographies, cookbooks, novels, editorials and volumes of poetry, including the children's rhyme "Mary Had a Little Lamb."

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Child Care
11:38 am
Thu November 28, 2013

Oklahoma Child Care Facility Settles With Feds Over Disabled Child

Credit DonkeyHotey

The Department of Justice has entered into an agreement with an Oklahoma-based child care facility that was found to have discriminated against a child with Down's Syndrome.

Under the agreement, Camelot Development Center will provide annual training on working with children with developmental disabilities and make modifications to try to allow the child to take field trips.

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Earthquakes
10:51 am
Thu November 28, 2013

Earthquakes Continue To Shake Edmond, Enid Areas

Amanda and Keith Erwin, of Edmond, say they're learning to live with near-daily earthquakes. The Erwins have written letters to both of their state lawmakers asking them to investigate.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

More earthquakes have rocked Oklahoma.

A preliminary report from the U.S. Geological Survey shows that a 2.5 magnitude earthquake struck 24 miles northwest of Healdton, in south-central Oklahoma, at 10 a.m. Tuesday.

It had a depth of 3.1 miles.

Another earthquake centered near Edmond struck at around 3:45 p.m. Tuesday. The 2.8 magnitude quake had a depth of 3.1 miles and was located 4 miles southeast of Edmond and 11 miles northeast of Oklahoma City.

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