KGOU

Amid Mounting Pressure, Charlotte Police Release Video Of Shooting

Earlier this week, police shot and killed Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C., sparking days of protests and conflicting accounts of the moment that led to his death. Amid the demonstrations, one chant in particular rippled through the crowds: "Release the tapes."Now, Charlotte police have done just that.At a press conference Saturday, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney announced the decision to release additional information and footage from two police cameras that captured the...
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Oil is everywhere, and in nearly everything: Our phones, our clothes, our food, and our medicine. It has driven industrial progress and technology. It has shaped our civilization, powered its rise. Despite all this, oil has exacted an enormous price: our climate is changing, smog is smothering cities around the world. That all comes, in part, from burning fossil fuels like oil.

September 18, 2016

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

Reading about media trends can be a little scary. There are always forecasts of doom and reports of innovations that will change the world, and concerns about how to pay for it all.

For me, public radio’s long time funding model works well. KGOU produces and delivers as much quality content as the budget will allow, and you get it first without having to pay.

Then you make donations based on how well we’ve done. The more people donate, the more we can deliver in the future.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump arrives at the home of Hunter and Kathy Miller in Norman for a fundraiser Saturday, September 17, 2016.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump spent a little over an hour in Norman Saturday afternoon, courting campaign donors just a few blocks from the campus of the University of Oklahoma.

More than 100 demonstrators gathered near the private residence where the fundraiser was held, protesting Trump’s views on race, immigration, and the economy.

Ian grew up in Milwaukee, in an African-American family with five kids where the annual income was just $25,000. He was involved in sports and after-school activities, and spent a year working after high school to save up for college. He saw himself as a role model in his community: "They see me going to college and are like, 'Oh, he's doing something positive, he's breaking through the ceiling.' "

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump appears at a rally in Oklahoma City on February 26, 2016.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump will be in Norman Saturday afternoon for a fundraiser just a few blocks from the University of Oklahoma campus.

Swaths of cannabis in northern Morocco. The U.N. estimates 80,000 families in the rugged northern Rif mountains make their living from growing marijuana. Their efforst have made Morocco the main hashish supplier for Europe and the world.
Abdeljalil Bounhar / AP

Since 2013, European Union officials have seized hundreds of tons of hashish, worth more than $3 billion, from 20 ships traversing a lucrative drug trafficking route across the Mediterranean.

The drugs flow through multiple countries – Morocco, Libya, Egypt, and some Balkan states – and even areas controlled by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants, who are taxing the shipments as it goes through their territory.

Maria Armoudian
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Maria Armoudian’s first book explored the role radio played in exploiting deeply-held divisions between Hutus and Tutsis during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

The abandoned Lantana Apartments complex at 7408 NW 10th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The big news that came out of this week’s Oklahoma City Council meeting involved the body formally voicing its opposition to State Question 777 – the so-called “right-to-farm” proposal.

The Dallas Morning News' SportsDay reporter Chuck Carlton analyzes University of Oklahoma president David Boren's comments Wednesday about the possibility of expanding the athletic conference.

Floaters navigate their homemade raft down the Arkansas River in Tulsa, Okla., during the annual Great Raft Race on Labor Day 2016.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The section of the Arkansas River that runs through Tulsa is changing. For much of the city’s history, business owners constructed buildings facing away from what has been considered a polluted eyesore. But now Tulsa is embracing its most prominent physical feature.

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