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Donald Trump at a campaign stop at the Oklahoma State Fair in September 2015.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The Oklahoma Oil Billionaire Shaping Donald Trump’s Bid To Win On Energy Issues

Donald Trump is wooing energy-state voters by promising a presidency that will champion coal, promote drilling and free frackers from federal regulations limiting oil and gas development. If the Republican candidate’s energy platform sounds like it was written specifically for fossil fuel companies, that’s because an Oklahoma oil billionaire helped craft it. Donald Trump delivered his first major speech on U.S. energy policy at a petroleum conference in the capital city of one the country’s...
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Members of the Choctaw Nation gather at the Hugo Community Center to hear details on the new water deal from attorney Michael Burrage.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

After five years of confidential negotiations, the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations have reached an agreement with the State of Oklahoma over water in southeast Oklahoma. The deal has been praised by state leaders as a historic accord that ends the tribes’ lawsuit that blocked Oklahoma City’s plan to pump water out of the region.

Gov. Mary Fallin, second from right, and her husband, Wade Christensen, second from left, greet Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, following a rally in Oklahoma City, Friday, Feb. 26, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump named four Oklahomans to his newly created Agriculture Advisory Committee Tuesday. Gov. Mary Fallin is the highest profile Oklahoman on the panel.

“The Trump administration will work closely with farmers, ranchers and other agricultural producers to ensure their issues and concerns are being addressed,” Fallin said in a statement.

The 64-member committee also includes state Agriculture Secretary Jim Resse, state Sen. Eddie Fields and state Rep. Casey Murdock.

Voters participate in early voting at the Oklahoma County Elections Board in Oklahoma City, Thursday, June 19, 2014.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A more than four-year legal challenge to overturn Oklahoma’s voter identification law was rejected earlier this week by a state district court judge who upheld the constitutionality of the measure.

Oklahoma County District Court Judge Aletia Haynes Timmons dismissed the case Monday after hearing arguments from lawyers representing the Oklahoma State Election Board and Tulsa resident Delilah Christine Gentges. Gentges’ attorney said he plans to appeal the decision.

Oklahoma City University economist Russell Evans, at lectern, addresses the Oklahoma City Council Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City University economist Russell Evans told city council members during Tuesday's meeting there's still a lot of economic uncertainty. 

Evans typically speaks to the city council in February when it’s time to plan the annual budget. But he was asked to give a special presentation after some council members pointed out that the city was suffering more than usual for its ties to the oil and gas industry, The Journal Record’s Brian Brus reports:

The Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission and audience members listen to a presentation on right-to-farm at the April 19 meeting in Tahlequah, Okla.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

City leaders in Edmond adopted a resolution urging citizens to reject State Question 777. Their counterparts in Choctaw appear likely to do the same, and the Norman City Council has booked a presentation from an organization fighting against the question, which would amend the state constitution to include the “right-to-farm” and prevent lawmakers from passing legislation impeding farming, ranching and agriculture.

Workers continue construction of a Hibdon Tires Plus at University Town Center in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It’s not in decline, but national construction spending is slowing, according to industry group Associated Builders and Contractors. But some Oklahoma companies are in hiring home.

The state saw a 6.9 percent increase in construction jobs from June 2015 to June 2016, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

Using a growing body of research, along with trial and error, scientists and state regulators are getting closer to pinpointing the cause of the startling increase in earthquakes in the central and eastern parts of the country, and preventing them.

Chemistry Professor & Head of Open Chemistry Collaborative in Diversity Equity (OXIDE) Rigoberto Hernandez
Paige Willett Lough / KGOU

In an article for Scientific American, author Katherine W. Phillips suggests that diversity in the workplace can enhance creativity, encourage discovery and lead to innovation. According to Rigoberto Hernandez, those assets may be most important in the scientific community.

 

This story contains sensitive sexual information and may not be suitable for all readers.

Juan Guerrero was scared to get out of prison.

He was serving a six-and-a-half-year sentence in Lawton, Oklahoma, for having sex with an underage teenager.

Now, one of about 800,000 registered sex offenders in the United States, Guerrero faces the challenge of assimilating back into society. He was in his mid-30s and asking some pretty daunting questions: Where would he live? Who would hire him? How would he explain his past to people?

United States' Alexander Naddour performs on the pommel horse during the artistic gymnastics men's apparatus final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016.
Julio Cortez / AP

Former University of Oklahoma gymnast Alex Naddour earned the bronze medal in the men’s individual pommel horse final Sunday afternoon during the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

It's the first medal in the event for the United States since Tim Daggett also took bronze in 1984.

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