Fencing surrounds the Ten Commandments monument on the grounds of the state Capitol in preparation for removal of the marker.
Dale Denwalt / The Journal Record

Ten Commandments Monument Removed From Oklahoma Capitol Grounds Late Monday Night

Late Monday night workers removed the Ten Commandments monument from the grounds of the state Capitol, satisfying a ruling by the Oklahoma Supreme Court. In June, the state’s highest civil court decided the privately funded display on the north side of the building violates a section of the Oklahoma Constitution prohibiting the use of state property to endorse a specific religion. No public money or property shall ever be appropriated, applied, donated, or used, directly or indirectly, for...
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Chesapeake Energy employees leave buildings after layoffs were reported Sept. 29, 2015
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Updated at 3:22 p.m.

Chesapeake Energy Corporation laid off nearly 15 percent of its total workforce on Tuesday at a time when oil prices remain low.

The Oklahoman newspaper reports that Chesapeake laid off 740 total workers, including 562 in Oklahoma City. Employees will get between 13 and 52 weeks of pay and will continue to receive health insurance and job placement help.

A group of state energy officials, researchers and industry experts issued a report Monday offering guidance on how to handle earthquakes triggered by oil and gas activity.

Ryan LaCroix / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The state will remove a Ten Commandments monument from the capitol grounds before October 12.

The Oklahoman newspaper reports that a state panel authorized the removal Tuesday of the monument, though it is unclear where it will go.

The Office of Management and Enterprise Services will be in charge of removing the monument.

Keith Dittrich (left) and Loren Broberg farm in the same part of northeast Nebraska. This summer they’ve had the right amount of rain at the right time. Even though most of their fields are irrigated, they have hardly run the sprinklers.
Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Farmers in the Midwest are facing a situation they haven’t seen in years. Grain prices are down. After some of the most lucrative growing seasons they’ve ever seen, some producers could lose money on this year’s crop. That could slow down the rural economy.

This isn't the first time that Carly Fiorina, who is running for president, has captivated Republican primary voters with her eloquence and tenacity. Five years ago, she overpowered two GOP opponents in California's U.S. Senate race before losing to Democrat Barbara Boxer.

Tulsa-based Williams Companies is housed in the BOK Tower in downtown.
Caleb Long / Wikimedia Commons

A Dallas-based company is set to complete the acquisition of one of Oklahoma's largest pipeline operators by the first quarter of 2016.

Energy Transfer Equity announced Monday that it will buy Tulsa's Williams Companies in a $37.7 billion deal.

The move will create the fifth-largest energy company in the world Williams Companies' net income fell 24 percent in the first six months of this year.

Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Eugene Glossip
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals denied death row inmate Richard Glossip’s request for a hearing on evidence his attorneys say casts doubts on his guilt, paving the way for his execution Wednesday afternoon.

Buffy Heater, chief strategy officer of the Oklahoma Health Care Authority, is evaluating options for shifting part of Oklahoma’s Medicaid population into a “coordinated care” program using private-sector contractors.
Warren Vieth / Oklahoma Watch

At the insistence of state lawmakers, the Oklahoma Health Care Authority is exploring cost-saving options that could lead to partial privatization of the state’s $2.4 billion Medicaid program for aged, blind and disabled people.

The state tried that once before, and it didn’t work out. Costs escalated, companies dropped out, and the state pulled the plug. Supporters of the new effort predicted it might turn out better because of improvements in managed-care practices.

This Is The Fund Drive

Sep 27, 2015

September 27, 2015

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

Last spring we tried a new way to raise money for the services KGOU provides.  We know programs you hear on KGOU are important to you. 

So, instead of interrupting Morning Edition and All Things Considered for 4 to 5 minutes at a time, encouraging listeners to give, we asked you to give during shorter, normal program breaks. 

It worked and the effort limited the disruptive breaks to only 17 hours instead of 70 or more. It is a much better system!

Paige Willet Lough

September 27, 2015

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

This week I’m pleased to introduce two new staff members to KGOU.

Paige Willett Lough joined us last week as the new host of All Things Considered and Operations Director. Paige is a University of Oklahoma graduate who worked for KGOU as a journalism student several years ago. With Paige handling operations, Brian Hardzinski will expand our web page content as a Digital News Editor.