First National Center in Oklahoma City
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Stymied Sale Of First National Center Could Proceed After Judge Appoints Receiver

It's September in Oklahoma, which is a pretty lousy time to shut off the air conditioner. That's exactly what happened at the First National Center in downtown Oklahoma City this week. The 84-year-old skyscraper in downtown Oklahoma has been for sale for well over a year, and last week employees and tenants that work in the building started moving their belongings out. On Tuesday, the building's utility company shut off A/C, which affected retail businesses and restaurants on the building's...
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Oklahoma police have shot and killed more people per capita this year than any other state in the nation. In Oklahoma City, fatal officer-involved shootings are on the rise as well, and that’s causing some to question officer training.

In July, four Oklahoma City police officers arrived at a house in the northeast part of the city. They were looking for Andre Williams. Williams was a registered sex offender with a lengthy record, and he had allegedly just raped a woman.

Sister Helen Prejean and actress Susan Sarandon appearing on the August 31 episode of "The Dr. Phil Show."
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A Hollywood actress spoke to a nationwide audience Monday on behalf of an Oklahoma death row inmate.

Susan Sarandon appeared on The Dr. Phil Show and urged Gov. Mary Fallin to issue a 60-day stay for Richard Glossip.

The Oklahoma inmate was convicted of first-degree murder for the 1997 death of Oklahoma City motel owner Barry Van Treese, and is scheduled to die September 16.

Oklahoma Attorney General's Office

The attorneys general of Oklahoma and Michigan are urging leaders in every state to impose state-based sanctions against Iran in response to a nuclear accord between Iran, the U.S. and other nations. 

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette sent a letter Monday encouraging sanctions to prohibit the investment of state assets in Iran.

The U.S. negotiated alongside other nations for nearly two years before finalizing an accord to curb Iran's nuclear program in exchange for billions of dollars in sanctions relief.

Dr. Larry Kincheloe speaks at the EXPLORE: Oklahoma Healthcare Summit in Norman on August 13, 2015.
Jim Johnson / KGOU

 

Oklahoma City’s location as a crossroads positions the metro  as a hotbed for human trafficking activity.

According to a Department of Justice reports from 2003, Oklahoma ranked fourth in the nation for the largest number of trafficking survivors in the United States. The top states were California, New York and Texas.

The intersection of major interstate highways like I-35, I-40 and I-44 means human traffickers move sex slaves and others involved in forced labor through Oklahoma City.

Tony Webster / Flickr

Oklahoma leads the nation in the number of police killings per capita so far this year, according to an analysis by The Guardian.

Oklahoma City police have been a part of seven fatal officer-involved shootings, which is more than any other department in the state in 2015. Officers from the police department in Tulsa -- the state’s second largest city -- haven’t shot and killed anyone in 2015, despite a higher violent crime rate.

Karen Holp and Laura Knoll/KGOU

August 30, 2015

This is from the Manager's Desk.   

As each semester starts at the University of Oklahoma, I like to introduce the students working at KGOU.

First, let me introduce our paid student staff members. You have heard her voice all summer as the host of the noon newscasts. Sarah Hurd will continue this semester handling a range of on-air and off-air duties, including Assignment Radio.

And returning after a summer break, Cesia Rascon is now the calendar editor, and her work is reflected in the events section of the KGOU web page.

Josh Gwartney, principal of the early childhood center at Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools, displays the paddle available to be used on students.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

More than a dozen names are inked onto the wooden paddle tucked behind Principal Josh Gwartney’s desk.

Each name memorializes a child who was given a swatting in Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools, located about 25 miles east of Tulsa.

Gwartney, who leads the early childhood center, said the paddle is rarely used on the center’s pre-kindergarten through second-grade students, and only with their parents’ permission. Paddling also is used in the district’s elementary, middle and high schools.

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy on a farm tour in Rocheport, Mo., in 2014
Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

To the chagrin of some of the nation’s largest farm organizations, the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday forged ahead with a plan to oversee more of the nation’s waterways, saying it will enforce new pollution rules in all but 13 states covered by an ongoing court case.

On the day the so-called “Waters of the U.S.” rules, or WOTUS, were set to go into effect, the EPA stuck to the deadline, despite a court order issued late Thursday.

Surveillance in New York City's financial district.
Jonathan McIntosh / Flickr

It’s been just over two years since former national security contractor Edward Snowden leaked hundreds of thousands of intelligence files and radically transformed the debate about digital surveillance.

President Barack Obama talks on the phone in the Oval Office with Secretary of State John Kerry to thank him for his work with the negotiations on the nuclear agreement with Iran, July 13, 2015.
Pete Souza / The White House

After years of negotiation designed to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon and keep the balance of power from shifting in the Middle East, Congress will vote on a nuclear agreement with the Islamic Republic next month.

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