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Dep. Sheriff Red Edgman, Dep. Sheriff Dave Harlan, Sheriff Orin Johnston and Henry Troup break up a still near Purcell, Oklahoma in 1933.
Purman Wilson Collection / Oklahoma Historical Society

'Born Sober,' But Always Plentiful: How Oklahoma Got Its Liquor Laws

Oklahomans are considering some of the biggest changes to the state’s liquor laws since the end of prohibition. If approved, State Question 792 would amend the state constitution and alter a system with roots planted during the days of Indian Territory. Learn more about what’s on November’s ballot Oklahoma’s liquor laws can make outsiders do a double-take. Low-point beer. No refrigeration at liquor stores, which are closed on Sundays. Looking for wine at a grocery store? Forget it. It...
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Officer Betty Shelby
Tulsa County Jail

Tulsa County jail records show the police officer charged with manslaughter in last week's shooting death of an unarmed black man surrendered to authorities early Friday morning.

Officer Betty Shelby was arrested at 1:00 a.m., booked at 1:11 a.m., and released at 1:31 a.m. after posting $50,000 bond.

Shekeyra Goodman sets a table in an event room Tuesday at the Embassy Suites Oklahoma City Downtown/Medical Center.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the Oklahoma Hotel and Lodging Association held its annual forecasting luncheon at the Skirvin in downtown Oklahoma City. The group’s figures show hotel demand in the state dropped 3.5 percent, while the supply was up 2.9 percent.

One of the presenters, Jan Freitag, basically said this decline all has to do with the price of oil, and that the demand for hotel rooms used to grow by 8 percent annually.

The shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, a 43-year-old African-American man, by Charlotte, N.C., police is under investigation and the circumstances are very much in dispute, but when you listen to protesters, you hear that their frustration isn't about just this one case.

Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler speaks to reporters Thursday after filing charges against Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby
John Durkee / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Prosecutors filed felony charges Thursday against a Tulsa police officer involved in the shooting death of an unarmed black man. The charges come less than a week after Terence Crutcher was shot Friday.

Farmers Wayne and Fred Schmedt watch a combine harvest wheat on their fields near Altus, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma voters will decide in November whether to change the state constitution with new language protecting the agriculture industry.

OWRB Executive Director J.D. Strong (left) addresses members of the water board at its Oct. 23, 2013 meeting.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

One of Oklahoma's top water officials will have a new job a little less than a month from now.

J.D. Strong will become the state Department of Wildlife Conservation’s executive director after six years leading the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

He’ll transition in October after the Governor’s Water Conference is over, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The Rev. Al Sharpton, center, speaks to the media at the National Action Center in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016 about the shooting death of Terence Crutcher in Tulsa. He's joined by Attorney Benjamin Crump (right), and Crutcher's father (bow tie).
Joseph Frederick / AP

The Rev. Al Sharpton says he's planning a rally in Tulsa on Tuesday to demand justice for the family of an unarmed black man killed Friday by a white police officer.

The civil rights leader called allegations Terence Crutcher may have been under the influence of drugs "bogus."

"Let a jury hear the facts,” Sharpton said. “But don't try and smear this young man in death as you smeared his blood in that highway."

The execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Attorney General Scott Pruitt says Oklahoma should consider adopting execution protocols using nitrogen gas in addition to lethal injection methods. Executions are currently on hold in the state while officials develop new procedures after executions went awry in 2014 and 2015.

Janet Roloff, managing attorney at the Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma’s McAlester office, represents a Fort Towson couple who couldn't afford a private attorney in a legal action to foreclosure on their mobile home.
Trevor Brown / Oklahoma Watch

Attorney Janet Roloff pauses as she tries to estimate what it would cost David and Minnie Harris if she had billed them for the hours she’s worked representing them in their mobile-home foreclosure case.

“For three years of litigation against major corporations?” she asks, seated behind a cluttered desk in the McAlester field office for Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma. “You know, I’d have to say least a hundred thousand dollars.”

That is well beyond the reach of the Harrises, a Fort Towson couple whose only income is Social Security disability payments.

Pastor Jennettie Marshall, of Living Sanctuary Evangelistic Ministries, speaks at a "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Gov. Mary Fallin is urging Tulsa residents to remain calm as authorities investigate a white police officer's fatal shooting of an unarmed black man.

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