Ryan LaCroix / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Supreme Court Says Ten Commandments Must Come Down, GOP Lawmakers Suggest Impeachment

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled Tuesday the Ten Commandments monument at the state Capitol has to be removed because it violates the state constitution’s ban on using public property to benefit a religion. Justices ruled 7-2 the monument erected in 2012 indirectly benefits Judeo-Christian faiths because the Ten Commandments are “obviously religious in nature.” Attorney General Scott Pruitt disagreed with the ruling, saying the state’s high court incorrectly interpreted Article 2, Section 5...
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President Obama called the Supreme Court's decision affirming the constitutional right of same-sex couples to marry a "victory for America" that had "made our union a little more perfect."

In the 5-4 decision, Justice Kennedy wrote the opinion of the court, saying the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution requires states to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

A control room in the ESPN studios in Bristol, Conn.
mike dunn / Flickr

At 7 p.m. on September 7, 1979, ESPN hit the airwaves with the first episode of its flagship program, SportsCenter. Although ESPN has become a staple of international sport and television, cofounder Bill Rasmussen says that when he first pitched the idea of a 24-hour sports network, reactions were mostly negative.

“I had people off the street say [a 24-hour sports network is] never going to work. I had business people say it’s never going to work,” Rasmussen said.

But he believed his idea was a good one.

States cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions, the Supreme Court says in a ruling that for months has been the focus of speculation. The decision was 5-4.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, seen as a pivotal swing vote in the case, wrote the majority opinion. All four justices who voted against the ruling wrote their own dissenting opinions: Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito.

Demonstrators gather outside the Supreme Court on Thursday after the ruling that Affordable Care Act subsidies are constitutional.
Ted Eytan / Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act means that more than 80,000 Oklahomans can continue to receive federal subsidies to help them pay for health insurance.

It will be days, possibly weeks, before the full impact of the ruling is assessed. In this Q&A, Oklahoma Watch addresses some of the immediate issues raised by the ruling.

Guests at Remington Park horce racing track in Oklahoma City could soon have a 180-room, $22 million destination hotel to stay in.
Kiddo27 / Wikimedia Commons

Two empty lots that bookend the core of Oklahoma City could soon see massive quality-of-life projects take shape.

Developer Neal McGee, who bought the dozen-plus acres along Interstate 35 at NE 50th Street, plans to sign a deal with Holiday Inn to build a 180-room, $22 million hotel. The destination hotel would serve the area the Oklahoma Department of Tourism and Recreation refers to as the "Adventure District," with the Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden, the ASA Hall-of-Fame softball stadium, and the Remington Park horse track all nearby.

Beekeeper Tim McCoy pries a hive of European honeybees out of an electrical box on Ed Crall's property near Weatherford, Okla.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Honeybees are dying at an alarming rate across the country, but no state lost a greater percentage of its bees than Oklahoma over the last year. When it comes to the general public, there’s a lot of mystery around this issue, but the reasons are becoming more clear.

Demonstrators gather outside the Supreme Court on Thursday after the ruling that Affordable Care Act subsidies are constitutional.
Ted Eytan / Flickr

Thursday morning the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of federal tax subsidies for the federal Affordable Care Act. The 6-3 ruling affects 87,000 Oklahomans who receive the insurance subsidies designed to make access to health care cheaper.

Subsidies were also at risk in 33 other states that didn't established a state-run marketplace. Instead, residents had to purchase their insurance through a federally run program.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday handed the Obama administration a major victory on health care, ruling 6-3 that nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act are legal.

"Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them," the court's majority said in the opinion, which was written by Chief Justice John Roberts. But they acknowledged that "petitioners' arguments about the plain meaning ... are strong."

Oklahoma Department of Transportation crews assess Thursday's rock slide along Interstate 35 northbound in Murray County near Davis.
Oklahoma Department of Transportation

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation says it’s working to remove nearly 20,000 tons of rock that fell in a June 18 landslide that’s kept Interstate 35 partially shut down for the past week.

Nearly 20 roads remain closed from previous storms dating to early May.

The tragic events in Charleston this month have released years of racial and political tension in the South, and the pressure is being felt by Republican officeholders across the region.

Why the Republicans? Because it is increasingly difficult to find officeholders in the region who are not Republicans.

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