World Views
11:41 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Iran's New Leader Already Showing More Moderate Tone

Supporters of president-elect Hasan Rowhani in the streets of Tehran the day before the election - June 13, 2013
Credit Tabarez2 / Wikimedia Commons

A week after Iran's presidential election, a previously-recorded interview run on Iranian state TV Friday suggests president -elect Hasan Rowhani may strike a more moderate tone than his predecessor.

The broadcast appears to be intended to underline Rowhani's pledge to pursue greater openness over Iran's nuclear program.

"How much is going to change is really to be determined," says Suzette Grillot, the Dean of the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. "The Supreme Leader (Ali Khamenei) in Iran certainly is the ultimate power-holder, so the relationship that emerges between these two and how that will have an impact on the nuclear situation is really something still to be determined."

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World Views
10:15 am
Fri June 21, 2013

What Makes Brazil's Protests Different Than Turkey

Students and workers protest in Rio de Janeiro's city center - June 13, 2013
Credit Tanya Rego / Agência Brasil/Wikimedia Commons

Residents of Brazil's largest cities have awakened to streets that are still smoldering after a million protesters turned out overnight -- sometimes clashing violently with police during anti-government demonstrations.

"This seems to be seems to be somewhat of a surprise given that Brazil was an economic success story for the last decade or so," says Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. "[It was] leading the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) countries in GDP and really doing quite well."

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Higher Education
9:10 am
Fri June 21, 2013

OU: Flat-Rate Tuition, No In-State Increase Next Year

Credit Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma says it will start offering students a flat-rate tuition and mandatory fees this fall.

OU President David Boren announced Thursday that full-time undergraduates taking between 12 and 21 credit hours per semester will pay a rate based on the university's current 15-credit hour rate for tuition and mandatory fees.

“Changing from a per-credit hour basis to a flat rate encourages all of our students to complete their degrees in a shorter period of time and get the best possible value for their tuition and fees dollar,” Boren said in a statement.

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Farm Bill
7:10 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Four Out Of Five Oklahoma Congressmen Agree: 'Yes' To Farm Bill

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Frank Lucas (R-OK3) speaks to the Oklahoma Farm Bureau in 2013.
Credit RepFrankLucas / Flickr

Sixty-two Republicans voted against the five-year, half-trillion-dollar farm bill that would have cute $2 billion annual from food stamps and let states impose broad new work requirements on those who receive them.

Freshman U.S. Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla. 1) was the only Oklahoma congressman to vote against the farm bill.

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Agriculture
5:26 am
Fri June 21, 2013

House Smacks Down Farm Bill, And Farm Lobby, Too

Gracie Shannon-Sanborn, 5, holds a sign as she joins her father Allen Sanborn (L) and members of Progressive Democrats of America at a rally in front of Rep. Henry Waxman's office on June 17, 2013 in Los Angeles, Calif. The protestors asked the congressman to vote against a House farm bill, which was defeated Thursday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:16 pm

The so-called farm bill came to the floor of the House of Representatives Thursday. And it crashed. The defeat shocked many observers, but the vote wasn't even particularly close: 234-195. (You can see how your own representative voted here.)

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:02 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Why Oklahoma’s Priority Is Storm Shelters For Individuals, Not Safe Rooms For Schools

Eleven-year-old Gavin Hawkins stands near the rubble of the Plaza Tower Elementary School. His dad, Joel, rushed to the school to pick up his son before the storm hit.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Listen to the story.

Seven children were killed at an elementary school in Moore when a massive tornado tore through the area last month.

And the disaster has led to questions about why Oklahoma used previous federal disaster money to build more than 10,000 storm shelters in homes, but only 85 in public schools.

Getting the answer means going back to another major storm, on May 3rd, 1999, and another state.

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This is KGOU
11:47 am
Thu June 20, 2013

'Radiolab' Hosts Talk Hmong, Influences In Reddit 'AMA'

"Radiolab" hosts Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich.
Credit Provided / Radiolab

The hosts of WNYC and NPR’s Radiolab took to the social media outlet reddit Wednesday to answer questions from fans and listeners as part of the “AMA (Ask Me Anything)” interview series.

Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich addressed the controversy surrounding the September 2012 episode Yellow Rain. Andrew Lapin writes in the public media trade publication Current that the program revisited the use of chemical weapons against the Hmong people in the closing days of the Vietnam War.

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Energy
9:36 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Ward Ousted As SandRidge CEO

SandRidge founder and former chairman and CEO Tom Ward
Credit Provided

Oklahoma City-based SandRidge Energy fired its founder, chairman, and CEO Wednesday. The board voted to replace Tom Ward with Chief Financial Officer James Bennett.

Ward founded the company in 2006 after leaving Chesapeake Energy - another Oklahoma City energy giant he helped start.

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It's All Politics
7:01 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Meet The New Governor: Sharply Partisan And Upwardly Mobile

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (foreground) speaks after a meeting with President Obama at the White House on Feb. 25. With him (from left): National Governors Association Vice Chairwoman Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin, and Delaware Gov. Jack Markell.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 6:35 pm

Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who is already executing prisoners faster than any Florida governor in modern times, signed a bill Monday designed to speed up the death penalty process.

Six weeks ago, Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley moved in the opposite direction: He signed a bill abolishing the death penalty, making Maryland the sixth state to end capital punishment in as many years.

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World Views
5:18 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

How The 1970s Changed The Role Of Human Rights In U.S. Foreign Policy

Jimmy Carter hosts a ceremony commemorating the 30th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 6 December 1978
Credit White House Staff Photographer / National Archives and Records Administration

This audio is pending

University of California, Berkeley historian Daniel Sargent says the 1970s were a turning point for American foreign policy.

“Prior to the '70s, the U.S. was very actively engaged in working to promote development and modernization within foreign countries in the developing world,” Sargent says. “And these efforts proved largely unsuccessful.”

Sargent says President Carter was the first, and last, president to make human rights a central policy issue. After Carter, the United States took a step back from actively promoting development and focused on maintaining an open system of international trade.

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