World Views
12:45 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Across The World, Citizens Empathize With Moore

Stella and Jack Howard (left and right) with their daughter, Dawnelaina (center), sit with the remains of their Moore home. The Howards built this house after their last one was destroyed by the May 3, 1999, twister.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Firat Demir about Turkey's reaction to the May 20 Moore tornado.

From Italy to Istanbul, the tragedy in Moore isn’t far from many people's minds or the front pages of international newspapers.

"We have received an amazing outpouring here from the mayor to regular citizens stopping by to see how they can help," says Rebecca Cruise, who's visiting the University of Oklahoma's center in Arezzo, Italy. "The emails from faculty with students abroad also show how much the world is paying attention to this story."

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12:23 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Teen Katrina Refugee Loses Home Again In Tornado

Lead in text: 
This week, 15-year-old Darius Joseph found himself displaced again - the Dick family home was destroyed in the tornado on Monday.
Darius Joseph, 15, moved with his mom from New Orleans to Moore, Okla. after his home was destroyed in Hurricane Katrina. Last year, Joseph ran away from home and moved in with the family of his best friend Brandon Dick.
The Deadly Tornado In Moore, Okla.
6:57 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Tornado's Survival Rate 'Not Just Luck,' Meteorologist Says

Marc Austin monitors radar and issues warnings at the National Weather Center in Norman, Okla., on Thursday.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:58 am

Monday's tornado in Moore, Okla., killed 24 people and caused an estimated $2.2 billion worth of damage. As the community reflects on what happened, one question is: How did so many manage to survive such devastating destruction?

Lifelong Oklahoman Kristi Freeman has seen her share of tornadoes, but she says the twister that tore through her neighborhood Monday was something else.

"This tornado was like a monster. It was like something that was alive. It destroyed your peace, your comfort," she says.

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Tornado In Moore, Okla.: Friday's Developments

Rita Green carried a plastic bin of items as she helped a family friend salvage things from a home Thursday in Moore, Okla.
Lucas Jackson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 9:19 am

As the residents of Moore, Okla., and surrounding communities continue to recover from Monday's devastating tornado that killed at least 24 people and injured more than 375, we're keeping an eye on the news from there:

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The Two-Way
5:05 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

After The Storm: Students Gather For One More School Day

Students and teachers from Eastlake Elementary and Plaza Towers Elementary schools gathered Thursday to say goodbye for the summer. This was a chance to reconnect after the devastating tornado brought an abrupt end to the school year at Plaza Towers in Moore, Okla.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 5:08 am

Under cloudy skies and through intermittent showers, 4-year-old Kamrin Ramirez holds in her little hands two cards, one addressed to Ms. Patterson, the other for Ms. Johnson, her two preschool teachers at Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Okla.

"I write thank you so much," she says.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

For Second Time, Moore Family Loses Home To A Tornado

An aerial photo shows destroyed houses in Moore, Okla., after Monday's tornado. Rena and Paul Phillips, who lost their home in the storm, also lost a house to a tornado in 1999.
Steve Gooch AP

The tornado that devastated Moore, Okla., Monday destroyed some 12,000 homes, according to Oklahoma City Police. And for one family, it was the second house they've lost to a tornado in the past 14 years. Rena and Paul Phillips say that the recent loss won't make them move.

The Phillipses told their story to Rachel Hubbard of Oklahoma member station KOSU, who reports on how they're coping with the loss — and the search for belongings in the rubble of their home — for Thursday's All Things Considered.

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Tornado Recovery
2:42 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Resources for Helping Youth and Children Cope with Disaster

Resources for parents, teachers, mental health professionals, and first responders, compiled by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network:

After the Tornado: Helping Young Children Heal (PDF)

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The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

In Oklahoma, Praying To A 'God Of Rebuilding'

Sue McClure, a volunteer with Disaster Relief of Oklahoma, assists tornado victims Wednesday at the First Baptist Church in Moore, Okla.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

All that's left standing at Kiaya Roper's house in Moore, Okla., is the bathroom. When a tornado struck the town on Monday, Roper was at work at Central Elementary School, her children were at school and her husband managed to ride out the storm by hunkering down in that bathroom.

"God put his hand down on his head for me," Roper says.

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Moore Finds Comfort In Animals Who Survived The Storm

Jen Elsner of Norman brings a lost dog to the shelter at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:58 am

There's no room at the inn for the Degmans. Not the Days Inn, anyway.

Jim and Marilyn Degman didn't suffer significant damage to their home in Monday's storm, but they lost power and decided to seek shelter elsewhere. They tried two other places before they found a La Quinta Inn & Suites that would admit Angel Baby, their toy poodle.

"I think she's a little more traumatized than we are, because of her routine," Jim says. "She can't go to her home."

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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Amid Nails And Mud, Oklahoma Neighborhood Pulls Together

Homes in the Heatherwood subdivision of Moore, Okla., were splintered by the tornado that swept through the area Monday.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 9:24 am

Brian Hock was standing Wednesday evening in what used to be his home but is now 2,000 square feet of nothing. Still resting in a bag of dog food was the cup he uses to scoop kibble, emblazoned with the slogan "Fear not: God's love shines bright."

Hock was at work Monday when the tornado smashed his house in the Heatherwood subdivision of Moore, Okla. He says his daughters survived only because neighbors invited them to share a custom shelter.

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