Education
5:38 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Missed Summer Learning Spells Out Long-Term Struggles

A researcher at Johns Hopkins University says there are serious setbacks for children without summer educational opportunities, known as the "summer slide."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:52 pm

At first glance, Horizons looks like an ordinary summer getaway for kids: There are games, bonding time and lots of bagged snacks. But along with the songs and the pool, there are fractions to memorize and online grammar quizzes to take.

An affiliate of a national network, the program in Washington, D.C., is a six-week, free summer service for children from low-income families. Its purpose is simple: to make sure they don't fall behind in school by the time September rolls around.

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Research News
3:27 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Worms' Bright Blue Death Could Shed Light On Human Aging

A nematode worm glows as it nears death in this screenshot from a YouTube video showing the work of researchers in London.
Wellcome Trust YouTube

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 6:50 pm

Last year, researchers at University College London's Institute of Healthy Ageing were looking through their microscopes when they saw something amazing.

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Code Switch
12:17 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Jobless Rate Falls For Blacks, But It's Not Good News Yet

Employment Specialist Louis Holliday, right, helps an applicant file for unemployment at a Georgia Department of Labor career center last month in Atlanta. The jobless rate for African-Americans fell from 13.7 to 12.6 percent in July, but that's still twice the rate for whites.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 12:46 pm

The labor market continues its recovery; the economy added 162,000 jobs in July and pushed the unemployment rate to a 4.5-year low. After a string of bad news, things seem to be to turning around for African-American workers, too.

"The operative word is growth," says Bill Rodgers, an economist at Rutgers University.

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The Salt
11:07 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Bringing Home The Woolly Bacon From Hungary

A Mangalitsa pig in 2008.
Li'l Wolf/Flickr

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 9:30 am

On a cold February evening in Budapest a few years ago, I was invited to go to a small festival on the edge of the city's main park. There, I was told, I would eat pig.

This was not unusual: In Hungary, the word for barbecue, szalonnasütés, means bacon cooking, whereby a piece of bacon is held over an open fire as the fat drips onto an awaiting slice of bread.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Sat August 3, 2013

FDA: Infected Lettuce At U.S. Restaurants Traced To Mexico

Farmhands at work in Tlaxcala, Mexico. The FDA said Saturday it would step up its surveillance of "green leafy products" from Mexico, after a rare parasite linked to a lettuce supplier there caused illness in more than 400 people in 16 U.S. states.
Jaime Puebla Associated Press

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 2:20 pm

The FDA said Saturday it would step up its surveillance of "green leafy products" from Mexico, after a rare parasite linked to a lettuce supplier there caused illness in more than 400 people in 16 U.S. states.

The parasite, known as cyclosporiasis, was first identified at Olive Garden and Red Lobster restaurants in Iowa and Nebraska and has since been discovered in Texas and numerous other states.

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Indian Times
9:17 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Forensic Art or Native Art? Harvey Pratt Does Both

Harvey Pratt
Credit Harvey Phillip Pratt

Harvey Pratt has turned his special skills into two specialized occupations: Native American artist and police forensic artist. Pratt, a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes of Oklahoma, first got notice as a school kid from the woman who discovered the Kiowa Five.

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World Views
9:07 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

How The Global Garment Industry Affects Workers In the Developing World

A garment factory in Bangladesh.
Kelsey Timmerman Flickr

In April, more than 1,100 workers died and thousands more were injured when a garment factory collapsed in Bangladesh. The deadliest garment industry disaster in history focused attention on the working conditions in clothing factories across the developing world.

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Business and Economy
6:02 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Tribal Tobacco Compacts Anger Convenience Store Owner

Cigarette Glow
Credit Bruce SuperFantastic / Flickr.com

A Tulsa-based convenience store chain is welcoming negotiations on tobacco compacts between the state and Oklahoma tribes.

Gov. Mary Fallin earlier this year rejected a request that the current compacts be extended and instead opened negotiations. Fallin's office says agreements have been reached with seven tribes and negotiations are continuing with 20 others.

QuikTrip spokesman Mike Thornbrugh calls the previous compact a "debacle" that drove customers away from non-tribal retailers.

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Politics and Government
3:58 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Adoption Of Cherokee Girl Could Lead To Her "Devastation"

A Cherokee Nation attorney says a 3-year-old girl will be devastated if she is adopted by a South Carolina couple and taken away from her biological father, who is a tribal member.

Chrissi Nimmo, an assistant attorney general for the Oklahoma-based tribe, said today that Dusten Brown is unquestionably a fit parent. She says she can't understand how a South Carolina judge on Wednesday could have issued an order finalizing the adoption of a child living with a fit biological parent.

Brown has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to stay the ruling.

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Shots - Health News
2:29 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Could Hotter Temperatures From Climate Change Boost Violence?

A police officer guards Cambodia's famed temple of Angkor Wat. The powerful city-state collapsed in 1431 after suffering through two decades of droughts.
Heng Sinith AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:48 pm

Rates of homicide and other violent crimes often spike in cities during heat waves. People get cranky. Tempers flare.

So as the Earth gets hotter because of climate change, will it also become more violent?

Many scientists have thought so. And now a team of economists offers the first quantitative estimates for just how much weather changes might amplify human conflict.

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