OneSix8
12:36 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Entertaining the Hours of Your Week

Fort Supply
Credit Fort Tours

Tributes to the Carpenters, cowboys, and blacksmiths provide Oklahomans with a chance to experience “life back when” this weekend.

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Assignment: Radio
12:05 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

A Round Barn Rendezvous on Historic Route 66

The Round Barn of Arcadia
Credit Joey Adams

At one point one of the most photographed landmarks on Route 66, by the late 1980s, the Arcadia Round Barn was starting to show its age (it was originally built in 1898). The roof collapsed in 1988, with an estimated $165,000 cost for repairs.

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Assignment: Radio
10:52 am
Wed March 20, 2013

"Cinema For the Ears" Dr. K's Sculptural Sounds.

Dr. Konstantinos Karathanasis, performing at the Tuesday Noon Concert Series at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.
Credit Cailey Dougherty

It’s Tuesday afternoon at the Sandy Bell Gallery of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The natural light showering the galleries above barely makes it down the stairwell to the space where Dr. Konstantinos Karathanasis, Assistant Professor of Composition and Music Technology, is performing. 

This intimate concert is part of the Tuesday Noon Concert series, a weekly 30-minute musical showcase at the museum.

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The Two-Way
8:57 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Though It Doesn't Feel Like It In Parts Of The Country, It's Really Spring!

A snow-covered cherry blossoms at the Yuyuantan Park in Beijing, China.
Li Xin Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 8:58 am

Don't tell Chicago, Buffalo or Minneapolis — which will see high temperatures just in the 20s, today — but at 7:02 a.m. ET., the Earth's axis was neither tilted from nor toward the sun, marking the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere.

So: Happy spring equinox!

The National Weather Service provides this explanation for what's happening with the Earth's orbit:

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National Security
2:08 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Off The Battlefield, Military Women Face Risks From Male Troops

Jamie Livingston was sexually abused while serving in the Navy. She now lives in El Paso, Texas.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Dora Hernandez gave a decade of her life to the U.S. Navy and the Army National Guard, but some of the dangers surprised her.

"The worst thing for me is that you don't have to worry about the enemy, you have to worry about your own soldiers," she says.

Sitting in a circle, a group of women nod in agreement. All are veterans, most have spent time in Iraq and Afghanistan, but they're also survivors of another war. According to the Pentagon's own research, more than 1 in 4 women who join the military will be sexually assaulted during their careers.

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Business and Economy
6:18 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Nebraska Company Settles Lawsuit with Oklahoma Man

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) - A Nebraska-based company accused of refusing to hire an Oklahoma man because of his religious beliefs has settled a discrimination lawsuit in the case.

The Lincoln Journal Star reports that Voss Lighting agreed to pay $82,500 to former job candidate Edward Wolfe. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission says Voss will also institute companywide actions to prevent further religious discrimination.

The EEOC sued the Lincoln company over the allegations last year in federal court in Oklahoma.

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Business and Economy
6:17 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Court Rules in OSU Insurance Case

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling against Oklahoma State University's athletic fundraising arm and its top booster, T. Boone Pickens, in their attempt to recover life insurance premiums in a fundraising plan.

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans handed down the decision Monday. It involves OSU's ``Gift of a Lifetime'' program, which involved $10 million insurance policies on 27 supporters with the university as beneficiary. OSU believed it would raise millions of dollars through the effort.

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Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship
4:20 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

A Turning Point For Talking About Suicide And Guns In Wyoming

Connie Jacobson, coroner in Natrona County, Wyo., says suicide is one of the biggest public health problems facing the state. Wyoming has the highest suicide rate in the U.S., and two-thirds of suicides in the state are by firearm.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 4:53 pm

Guns are a big part of everyday life in Wyoming, and many residents have been directly impacted by a suicide in which a gun was used. The state has the highest suicide rate in the nation, and three-quarters of Wyoming's suicides are by firearm.

The rural state's relationship with guns has long made suicide prevention efforts challenging. But that may be starting to change.

Lax Gun Laws

Last year, there were more suicides in Natrona County than anywhere else in Wyoming.

The soft-spoken county coroner saw them all.

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It's All Politics
3:38 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

How The Federal Budget Is Just Like Your Family Budget (Or Not)

Is your family budget really like the federal budget?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 6:51 pm

The House has begun debate on its budget resolution, with a vote expected later this week. And as supporters talk about this budget, there's one comparison you hear a lot.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio: "Every family in America has to balance their budget. Washington should, too."

Rep. Scott Garrett, R-N.J.: "You know, every family in America understands the necessity of a balanced budget."

Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis.: "This is how every family tries to live in good times and in bad. Your government should do the same."

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Fresh Air
1:11 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Veterans Face Red Tape Accessing Disability, Other Benefits

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 4:05 pm

Ten years ago, the United States invaded Iraq and began what the Bush administration said would be a short war.

But it wasn't until December 2011 that the United States officially ended its military mission there.

In addition to the tens of thousands of Iraqis who died, the war cost the lives of nearly 4,500 American service members, and wounded more than 32,200 men and women in America's military. Many of the wounded vets have faced — or are still facing — long waits for their disability and other benefits to begin.

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