NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Can Just One Concussion Change the Brain?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Suffering a single concussion may cause lasting brain damage, researchers report in the journal Radiology. Steven Flanagan, co-director of the Concussion Center at NYU Langone Medical Center, discusses the findings, and why diagnosing a concussion is so difficult.

NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

And The Award For Best Picture Goes To....

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

More than 450 photographers submitted a shot to SciFri's Winter Nature Photo Contest, and thousands of fans helped choose a winner. Contest judge Clay Bolt discusses the winning entry, and what makes for a prize-winning shot. Plus, tips for budding nature photographers.

NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Curiosity Hits Paydirt: New Clues To Life On Mars

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Microbes may once have happily existed on the surface of Mars, according to chemical analysis of a sedimentary rock in the Red Planet's Gale crater. NASA geologist and exobiologist David Blake discusses evidence for an ancient freshwater lake in the crater, and describes the mineral-chomping microbes that may have thrived there.

NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Improving Healthcare, One Search At A Time

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. We've all been there, sitting at the computer late at night, clicking on those websites that offer medical opinions, trying to convince ourselves that our headache must be caused by a brain tumor, right? Yeah, that dry skin you've had for the last couple of months, of course it's due to a thyroid disorder because that's what you're finding out on the Web. Recognize yourself?

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The Two-Way
10:33 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Construction Crews May Have Found 'Black Plague' Victims In Britain

Archaeologists examine skeletons thought to be from the 14th century that were discovered in an excavation belonging to British rail company, Crossrail.
Crossrail

What can you find underneath a British railroad or parking lot? These days it could be skeletons, and probably a lot of them. Last month, researchers announced the bones of a man discovered underneath a British parking lot were actually King Richard III. Today, a British rail project says some of its staff stumbled upon skeletons of people who may have died of the Black Death nearly 700 years ago, during an outbreak of bubonic plague.

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Flu
10:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Elderly Hit Hard by Oklahoma Flu Season

A patient receive a vaccination for influenza.
Credit NHSE / Flickr Creative Commons

State health officials say 33 people have died from the flu in Oklahoma this season.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health reports more than 1,000 hospitalizations are attributed to influenza so far this flu season, which runs from September until May.

In the 2011-12 flu season, the state recorded 316 hospitalizations and nine deaths.

According to the health department, Tulsa County has recorded the highest number of deaths this season at eight. Oklahoma County reports five deaths, while Comanche County has four deaths.

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Movie Interviews
9:35 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Paul Thomas Anderson, The Man Behind 'The Master'

most twisted father-son tales ever told."" href="/post/paul-thomas-anderson-man-behind-master" class="noexit lightbox">
Navy veteran Freddie (Phoenix) falls under the influence of cult leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) in Anderson's film, which critic Ella Taylor describes as "one of the most twisted father-son tales ever told."
Phil Bray The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 10:52 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 2, 2012.

For Paul Thomas Anderson, moviemaking is not just an art; it's also about time management.

"At its best, a film set is when everybody knows what's going on and everybody's working together," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "At its worst, [it's] when something's been lost in communication and an actor's not sure how many shots are left or what's going on, and the makeup department's confused."

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
9:22 am
Fri March 15, 2013

It's All Politics, Mar. 14, 2013

Vincenzo Pinto AFP/Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

The white smoke has appeared and that can mean only one thing: the new edition of the It's All Politics podcast with NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving is ready. It also means that there's no budget deal in Congress, that the annual Conservative Political Action Conference is underway and that Carl Levin has decided that 36 years in the Senate is enough.

TED Radio Hour
9:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Are We Plugged-In, Connected, But Alone?

Sherry Turkle is concerned about how our devices are changing us, as human beings.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 7:36 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Sherry Turkle's TEDTalk

As we expect more from technology, do we expect less from each other? Sherry Turkle looks at how devices and online personas are redefining human connection. She says we need to really think about the kinds of connections we want to have.

About Sherry Turkle

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Shots - Health News
9:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Power Shift Under Way As Middle Class Expands In Developing World

Brookings Institution

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:00 am

"The meek shall inherit the earth" — that seems to be the latest message from the United Nations Development Program.

Their 2013 Human Development Report chronicles the recent, rapid expansion of the middle class in the developing world. It also predicts that over the next two decades growth in the so-called "Global South" will dramatically shift economic and political power away from Europe and North America.

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