Assignment: Radio
1:57 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

91-Year-Old Painter Regina Murphy Says Art Keeps Her Alive

Monkey Business
Regina Murphy

Assignment: Radio's Kate Carlton speaks with artist Regina Murphy.

Men in skinny ties accompany women wearing maxi dresses while they window shop through the pastel building-lined Paseo Arts District.Inside the studio on the corner of 30th and Paseo, you’ll find Regina Murphy.

The 91-year-old has seen plenty of Oklahoma history, but it’s her own life experiences that drive her. She belongs in Studio Six, and she says she doesn’t feel out of place amongst the younger artists in the Paseo District.

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1:35 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Pain and Consequences for Those Taking Too Much Pain Medication

Lead in text: 
Several states are now trying to tackle what they see as a serious public health concern. Oklahoma is one of the leading states on that front, as PBS Newshour health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports.
At age 22, college football player Austin Box had suffered a slew of painful injuries. Two weeks after his graduation, he overdosed on a lethal cocktail of pain medications, none of which he had been prescribed. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports on the perils of painkillers and the difficulty of combating abuse.
Assignment: Radio
11:48 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Tia Brooks' Dual Identity As OU Student And Olympian.

The many sides of Tia Brooks. Olympian, collegiate athlete, and college student.
Credit Kiana King and Meredith Everitt

Tia Brooks lives a superman life style. One moment she is an Olympic athlete, and the next she is a regular college student. Brooks began her athletic career in high school running track, before she switched to shot put. That change allowed her to continue as a collegiate athlete at the University of Oklahoma, which then brought her to London in 2012.

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Bangladesh
11:35 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Bangladesh Has History of Fatal Factory Accidents

A woman in Dhaka, Bangladesh
Credit Peregrino Will Reign / Flickr Creative Commons

KGOU visiting Bangladesh journalist Sima Bhowmik reports on the history of problems in her nation's garment industry, including accountability of business owners.

Police in Bangladesh say the death toll from a building collapse last week has passed 400.

The eight-story Rana Plaza building housing five garment factories and other offices collapsed onto itself April 24. Workers were still pulling bodies from the rubble Wednesday.

Officials at the police control room said 399 bodies had been pulled from the wreckage and three of the injured had died at the hospital. That brought the death toll to 402 in the tragedy that was considered the worst industrial accident in Bangladesh's history.

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OneSix8
10:53 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Entertaining the Hours of Your Week: A Festival Wrap

Noble, Oklahoma
Credit www.jim-west.com

In spite of these perpetual winter reminders, the spring festival season is upon us. This week's OneSix8 highlights three fairs that are more than just their productions. 

For the past 30 years, Noble has been billed as “the Rose Rock Capital of the World.” Now, every first weekend in May, the town commemorates that status with the Rose Rock Music Festival.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Slow Growth In April: Survey Shows 119,000 Jobs Added

In Denver last month, a recruiter (right) talked with a job seeker at a health care career fair. There was job growth in April, according to a new survey, but the pace was modest.
Rick Wilking Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:59 am

A relatively weak 119,000 jobs were added to private employers' payrolls last month as federal spending cuts and tax increases began to bite, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report.

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Business
7:13 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Foreign Factory Audits, Profitable But Flawed Business

A Bangladeshi soldier walks through rows of burnt sewing machines Nov. 25, after a fire in the nine-story Tazreen factory in Savar, near Dhaka. The fire killed 112 people.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 10:11 am

A factory collapse in Bangladesh last week killed more than 400 people, mostly garment workers. Hundreds more are still missing, making it one of the largest manufacturing disasters in history. It's just the latest horrific accident in the garment industry despite more than a decade of auditing aimed at improving working conditions.

In September 2012, a fire at the Ali Enterprises factory in Pakistan killed nearly 300 workers. Six weeks later, in November, a fire in the Tazreen factory in Bangladesh killed 112 people. Then, last week, there was the Rana Plaza collapse.

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9:13 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

If You Want to Understand Oklahoma’s Drought, Go Play in the Dirt

Lead in text: 
But what falls from the sky is only part of the equation. In Oklahoma, droughts are meteorological — and agricultural.
Spring rains have started to fill rivers and reservoirs, and helped bring relief to parts of drought-stricken Oklahoma. But what falls from the sky is only part of the equation. In Oklahoma, droughts are meteorological - and agricultural.
9:10 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Locating the Uninsured

Lead in text: 
"In some counties in Oklahoma, a quarter to nearly a third of the population lacks health insurance. The highest percentages are found in smaller, rural counties, such as Cimarron County and Harmon County. Counties with higher poverty rates, such as in southeastern Oklahoma, tend to have greater shares of uninsured residents."
( Interactive by Darren Jaworski. Story by Chase Cook.) More than a fifth of Oklahomans under the age of 65 do not have health insurance, giving the state the sixth highest uninsured rate in the nation. More than 690,000 non-elderly Oklahomans, or 21.9 percent, were uninsured in 2010, according to the U.S.
Politics and Government
5:59 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Republican Legislators Draft Alternate Healthcare Plan

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A group of Oklahoma Republican legislators have developed an alternative plan to provide health coverage to uninsured residents that would require most recipients to work and make modest co-payments.

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