Author Interviews
2:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

The 'Big Data' Revolution: How Number Crunchers Can Predict Our Lives

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 12:52 pm

When the streaming video service Netflix decided to begin producing its own TV content, it chose House of Cards as its first big project. Based on a BBC series, the show stars Kevin Spacey and is directed by David Fincher, and it has quickly become the most watched series ever on Netflix.

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The Salt
1:59 am
Thu March 7, 2013

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains.
Isagani Serrano International Rice Research Institute

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 9:44 am

There's a kind of rice growing in some test plots in the Philippines that's unlike any rice ever seen before. It's yellow. Its backers call it "golden rice." It's been genetically modified so that it contains beta-carotene, the source of vitamin A.

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The Two-Way
1:21 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Alvin Lee Is Going Home: 'Ten Years After' Guitarist Dies

Alvin Lee performing with Ten Years After in the early 1970s.
Lebre Sylvie Dalle /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 8:18 am

Guitarist Alvin Lee, whose incendiary performance with the British band Ten Years After was one of the highlights of the 1969 Woodstock festival, has died.

He was 68. Lee's website says he "passed away early this morning [Wednesday] after unforeseen complications following a routine surgical procedure." An assistant to his daughter also confirmed the news to NPR.

His band's biggest hit — "I'd Love to Change the World" — came a couple years after Woodstock. We'll embed a clip from that.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Law Targets Sexual Violence On College Campuses

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 10:30 am

When President Obama signs an updated version of the Violence Against Women Act on Thursday afternoon, the law will include new requirements for how colleges and universities handle allegations of sexual assault.

Laura Dunn, who's been invited by the White House to attend, plans to be there.

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Politics and Government
6:23 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Fallin Accepts CNG Vehicles

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -_ Gov. Mary Fallin has accepted delivery of more than a dozen compressed natural gas-fueled pickup trucks that are being added to Oklahoma's fleet of vehicles.  Fallin said Wednesday that the CNG vehicles will cut the state's vehicle fuel costs and help reduce harmful exhaust emissions.  The trucks were delivered by John Vance Motors of Guthrie and Chrysler executives.

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Politics and Government
6:22 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

E-Cigarette Bill Passes Senate

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A bill that would prevent youth access to electronic cigarettes has been approved in the Senate.  The Senate voted 26-15 on Wednesday for the bill that also limits the taxes that can be levied on the so-called ``e-cigarettes.''  An alternative to traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat a liquid nicotine solution and create vapor that users inhale. Under current law, there is no age restriction on the purchase of these products.  The bill would prohibit anyone under 18 from purchasing any vapor or tobacco-derived products.  The measure

State Capitol
6:21 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Pinnell Won't Seek Third Term

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - Oklahoma Republican Party Chairman Matt Pinnell says he won't seek another term in office when his term expires next month.


Pinnell said Wednesday he would not run for a third term at the Oklahoma Republican Party Convention on April 20. First elected in 2010 when former Chairman Gary Jones ran for Oklahoma auditor and inspector, Pinnell was re-elected to a full two-year term in 2011.

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Education
6:15 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Low-Performing Schools Bill Passes Senate

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - Parents of children in low performing Oklahoma public schools could petition to have them converted to charters school and, in some cases, have a principal and other administrators fired, under a bill approved by the Senate. 

The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Fossils Suggest Giant Relatives Of Modern Camels Roamed The Canadian Arctic

Illustration of the High Arctic camel on Ellesmere Island during the Pliocene warm period, aboutthree-and-a-half million years ago. The camels lived in a boreal-type forest. The habitat includeslarch trees and the depiction is based on records of plant fossils found at nearby fossil deposits.
Julius Csotonyi

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 10:49 am

Camels belong in the desert. That's what we've learned since grade school.

Today, NPR's Melissa Block talked to Natalia Rybczynski, a paleobiologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature, who tells Melissa that fossils she has unearthed tell a different story.

The fossils, found on a frigid ridge in Canada's High Arctic, show that modern camels actually come from giant relatives that roamed the forests of Ellesmere Island 3.5 million years ago.

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Economy
4:58 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Time For The Fed To Take Away The Punch Bowl?

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke testifies before the Senate Banking Committee in Washington last month. Some analysts wonder if he and other policymakers have kept interest rates too low for too long.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 10:49 am

The stock market's long climb from its recession bottom has some people concerned it may be a bubble about to burst — a bubble artificially pumped up by the Federal Reserve's easy-money policy. That's led to calls — even from within the Fed — for an end to the central bank's extraordinary efforts to keep interest rates low.

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