Music Reviews
11:52 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Tegan And Sara Reach Out To New Audiences With 'Heartthrob'

Twin sisters Tegan and Sara Quin have been writing songs since they were 15 and independently released their first full-length album in 1999. Since then, they've produced seven studio albums.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:06 pm

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Oklahoma Voices
11:33 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Gov. Fallin Shares Workers' Compensation Changes with OKC Chamber

Gov. Mary Fallin prepares to deliver her 2013 State of the State address.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin speaking to the Oklahoma City Chamber Feb. 21.

Gov. Mary Fallin told members of the Oklahoma City Chamber she supports many of the changes contained in workers' compensation law making its way through the legislature.

"Oklahoma's ranked among the top states in the nation on workers' compensation premium costs," Fallin said. "I've told our legislators, and our Pro Tem, and our Speaker, 'If you get a bill to my desk that does those things, I am very supportive of moving toward an administrative system.'"

Fallin's comments on Feb. 21 were the first to endorse the plan outlined in a bill by Senate President Pro Tempore Brian Bingman of Sapulpa.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Mon March 11, 2013

International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade

Indonesian fishermen unload their catch, including sharks and baby sharks, in Lampulo fish market in Banda Aceh last week.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:33 pm

Delegates to an international species conservation conference in Bangkok, Thailand, this week have agreed to limit the trade of shark fins and meat.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that government representatives to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, have agreed to put the porbeagle, oceanic whitetip, three kinds of hammerhead shark and two kinds of manta ray on its Appendix II list, which places restrictions on fishing but still allows limited trade.

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Mental Health
11:07 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Forgiveness Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 12:28 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the season of reflection, for many religious people around the world. The importance of repentance and forgiveness are often a focus this time of year. But faith leaders aren't the only people who talk about the importance of forgiveness.

Recently, on this program, we talked about the work of psychologists who are trying to teach people how to practice forgiveness. They note that there are often physical and emotional benefits to forgiveness.

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Politics
11:03 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Dr. Ben Carson: Healthcare Is 'Upside Down'

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 1:01 pm

Dr. Ben Carson is known for blazing trails in the neurological field — including breakthrough work separating conjoined twins. Now he's making waves for his political views. Host Michel Martin talks with Carson about the current state of health care in America and his upcoming speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

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Shots - Health News
10:49 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Hardening Of Human Arteries Turns Out To Be A Very Old Story

A 3-D reconstruction of Mummy 38's CT scans shows calcification in her aorta and iliac arteries.
Courtesy of The Lancet

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 12:23 pm

Going "paleo" may not be the answer to heart disease, after all.

A few years ago, a team of researchers challenged our understanding of heart disease as a modern affliction. They found evidence of hardened arteries in the CT scans of ancient Egyptian mummies.

It was a little surprising since our predecessors didn't have fried chicken or cars.

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The Salt
10:48 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Edible Bonsai: East Meets West On These Cookie Canvases

Risa Hirai's bonsai cookies are made from sugar, flour, butter and egg. They're completely edible as long as they haven't been on display for too long.
Courtesy of Galerie Tokyo Humanité

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:37 pm

Risa Hirai is a Japanese artist who paints detailed images of bonsai trees and Japanese meals. But instead of using paint on a canvas, she works with icing on a cookie.

The 23-year-old is a senior at Tama Art University in Tokyo whose mouthwatering works will be exhibited at Gallery Tokyo Humanite all this week. Assistant director Maie Tsukuda tells The Salt it's the gallery's first cookie exhibit and notes that it's not an ordinary medium for artists.

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Oklahoma Voices
10:44 am
Mon March 11, 2013

If We Have Better Bus Service, Do I Have to Leave My BMW in the Drive?

Oklahoma City Council member Ed Shadid finds many bus benches unsafe and uncomfortable.
Credit Ed Shadid

 The BMW question is one Jarrett Walker received when helping a city determine the most effective form of public transit for its residents, an idea he calls "abundant access."

Walker's article in the Atlantic dealing with the problem of "bus stigma" contains many of the points he presented to about 500 people at a public transit town hall in Oklahoma City.

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Freedom of Information
10:37 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Fallin, Attorney Win "Black Hole" Award

Two newspapers and a state lawmaker received FOI  Oklahoma's top awards during the organization's Sunshine Week activities.

The Marian Opala First Amendment Award was presented Saturday to the Enid News & Eagle. The Ben Blackstock Award went to the Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise.Republican state Rep. Jason Nelson was presented the  Sunshine Award for opening the doors of secrecy at the Department of Human  Services.FOI Oklahoma gave Governor Mary Fallin and her attorney, Steve Mullins, the Black Hole Award for what is considered damage to the public's right to know about governmental activity.

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Afghanistan
10:36 am
Mon March 11, 2013

With Withdrawal Looming, U.S. Troops Shift Their Aim

An Afghan policeman stands guard near the scene of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, Feb. 27
Musadeq Sadeq AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:36 pm

The NATO campaign is now in a new phase. After years of fighting the Taliban and bolstering anemic local governance, NATO troops are handing those responsibilities over to the Afghans. NPR's Sean Carberry recently embedded with U.S. troops in the southern province of Kandahar as they worked on this new mission.

The fertile Arghandab Valley in Kandahar province is considered one of Afghanistan's breadbaskets. For years it was also a valley of death for NATO troops.

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