KGOU

Ronny Jackson Withdraws As VA Nominee

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Trump's embattled nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, has withdrawn from consideration for the post amid allegations he had fostered a hostile work environment and behaved improperly while serving as the top doctor leading the White House medical unit. In a statement Thursday morning, Jackson said, "Going into this process, I expected tough questions about how to best care for our veterans, but I did not expect to have...

Read More
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

A Catholic priest is accused of sexual misconduct on the campus of St. Gregory’s University in Shawnee and former students and faculty have questioned whether officials at the now-shuttered college failed to properly investigate complaints.

Two women have filed a lawsuit against the university, which closed and filed bankruptcy in December, and St. Gregory’s Abbey, where the priest resides.

As Oklahoma's teacher walkout enters its eighth day, the union leading it has a new demand to end it.

Oklahoma Education Association is now saying lawmakers just need to raise another $50 million in revenue for the state budget, and they'll send educators back to school.

Katherine Bishop, OEA Vice President, says it's up to lawmakers to find the money. She doesn't care whether it comes from a wind tax or a repeal of the capital gains exemption, she just wants to see the legislature raise another $50 million to shore up the state budget.

For the first time in 14 years, Oklahoma City has a new mayor.

On Tuesday morning, former state senator David Holt was sworn into office before his first city council meeting.

An Oklahoma City native, Holt is the 36th mayor and is also the first Native American to hold the title. At age 39, he’s also the youngest American leader of a city with more than 500,000 residents.

Teachers in Arizona are staging what they're calling a walk-in today. They're asking lawmakers for a 20 percent pay raise and for school funding to return to pre-recession levels. This comes as teachers in Oklahoma continue their walk-out. After more than a week of protests and dozens of closed schools across the state, Oklahoma lawmakers have already agreed to increase teacher pay and school funding.

Trucks pass each other along a rural road just off south of Kingfisher.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A bill that would change how Oklahoma oversees trucking is drawing conflict of interest questions because the legislation’s sponsor owns trucks as part of his business.

Gabriel Hongusit / Reveal

In 2016, the Justice Department alleged that Malaysian officials stole billions of dollars from their people and funneled some of it through the United States.

Reveal teamed up with Washington D.C.’s public radio station, WAMU, to dig into one of the largest investigations ever by the Justice Department’s Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative.

It’s a tale that features cameos from Leonardo DiCaprio, Donald Trump, the world’s largest yacht, a Malaysian playboy known for his lavish spending in New York nightclubs, and – as you might imagine – lots of Champagne.

Trevor Brown / Oklahoma Watch

For the fifth time since Oklahoma teachers left their classrooms, House Republicans refused to hear a bill that would end a lucrative tax break for high earners and potentially bring an end to the one-week-old teacher walkout.

Eliminating the capital gains tax deduction – something that largely benefits the wealthy – would free up $100 million or more a year that could be used for education and to shore up the state budget. A state-commissioned consulting group last year recommended the tax break be repealed.

Teachers in Oklahoma are in the sixth day of their walkout Monday, as they fight to get increased state education funding. Lawmakers there have already passed a few measures to increase funding and give teachers a salary bump, but educators say they haven’t gone far enough.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Sharon Reese, a special education teacher at Shawnee High School in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

Dozens of schools across the state are closed for the seventh day, as thousands of Oklahoma teachers, students and education supporters are expected to descend on the state capitol today.

Warmer weather brought more demonstrators on Monday than the previous week, although the fight over education funding seems to be at a stalemate.

Updated 2:09 p.m.

It's day six of the Oklahoma teacher walkout and some students miss being in school. Administrators at Wilson Elementary in Oklahoma City arranged a play date so kids could see their friends and their teachers. StateImpact’s Emily Wendler was there.

Updated 10:05 a.m.

Pages