Ted Eytan / Flickr

Gay Tribal Members Not Guaranteed Their Own 'Big Fat Creek Wedding'

The majority of tribal nations across the country do not recognize same sex marriage. Because of tribal sovereignty, the Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality does not apply. Many gay tribal members are struggling to balance celebration for LGBTQ members across the states and the sting that comes with knowing they may not be able to marry within their own nation. Justin and Cherrah Giles both live in and work for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation in northeast Oklahoma. They’ve been married for...
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Guards make their rounds on the eighth floor of the Oklahoma County Jail in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

For the past few months a committee has been looking at how to pay for a new Oklahoma County Jail, and made its recommendation on Tuesday.

The facility is only about 25 years old, but it’s had construction problems, mold, sewage in the cells – to the point where the U.S. Department of Justice stepped in and said the inmates faced violations of their constitutional rights.

If you have a disability in the U.S., you're twice as likely to be poor as someone without a disability. You're also far more likely to be unemployed. And that gap has widened in the 25 years since the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act was enacted.

"Every man, woman and child with a disability can now pass through once-closed doors into a bright new era of equality, independence and freedom," President George H.W. Bush said when he signed the bill into law on July 26, 1990.

Tulsa Braces For 100-Degree Weekend

Jul 23, 2015

NOAA’s National Climate Data Center reported this week that temperatures across the globe for the first six months of 2015 are the warmest on record.

While that is great for beachgoers, it also endangers millions of lives, as heat is the No. 1 weather-related killer in the United States.

One city that’s feeling the heat is Tulsa, Oklahoma, which has 100-degree temperatures forecast for the weekend.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Tulsa office snapped this photo of the Webbers Falls Lock and Dam in late May 2015.
USACETULSA / Flickr

Two and a half million tons of wheat, fertilizer, steel, and manufacturing goods pass through the Port of Catoosa each year.

But not in 2015. The nation’s most inland seaport, located near Tulsa, shut down after historic spring rains and is still struggling to rebound.

Jonathan Youngblood / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

A new report out Thursday morning says 45 percent of Oklahoma City's roads are in poor condition.

“That’s taking a toll on [drivers’] wallets each year, to the tune of about $917 annual in what we call ‘extra-vehicle operating costs’,” said Carolyn Kelly with the transportation research group TRIP. “And those are essentially the ways rough roads beat up your vehicle.”

OversightAndReform / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Sen. James Lankford is introducing a bill to end all taxpayer funding for Planned Parenthood unless the organization stops performing all abortions.

Lankford announced Wednesday he has introduced the Defund Planned Parenthood Act, which would impose a one-year moratorium on federal funding to the organization unless it stops providing abortions.

Planned Parenthood provides a variety of non-abortion health services, including health screenings, family planning and adoption referrals at several clinics in Oklahoma.

James Alexander, who suffers from bipolar II disorder, spends 23 hours a day in lockdown in the Tulsa County jail.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

Before he was locked up in the Tulsa County jail, James Alexander lived in a hole in the ground.

That hole was under Interstate 44 in east Tulsa, and there he slept, ate and stored his belongings, including food he had stolen from nearby stores. He lived with depression related to bipiolar II disorder.

In jail for nearly two years since, Alexander, 30, now has a stable life. He is locked up 23 hours a day but gets steady meals. He is offered medication but refuses to take it.

His red beard is wiry and his fingernails long and yellowed.

Heath Gerlock, a founder of Farmobile, shows the orange box device that can feed farm data directly to a tablet, smartphone or computer. Gerlock pictured in the Iowa Public Radio studio in Ames.
Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Technology has transformed farming, one of the Midwest’s biggest industries, and while fewer people are now needed to actually work the farm field, new types of jobs keep many office workers tied to agriculture.

Beyond operating a tractor and a combine, today’s farmers need to manage all kinds of information. From information technology to web development, the skills that have changed our economy have transformed the agriculture industry as well.

The National Guard

Oklahoma National Guard soldiers and airmen could soon be carrying weapons at recruiting stations and armories across the state.

Guard spokesman Col. Max Moss said Tuesday that the Oklahoma National Guard is finalizing guidelines and identifying soldiers who would be eligible to carry firearms at its facilities.

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