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Technicians set up the stage for the presidential debate between Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016.
Patrick Semansky / AP

Live: Debate Fact Check From NPR Politics

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors. _ KGOU produces journalism in the public interest, essential to an informed electorate. Help support informative, in...
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Before Scott Kopytko joined the New York City Fire Department, he worked as a commodities broker in the South Tower at the World Trade Center. On Sept. 11, he rushed up the stairs of his old office building, trying to save lives with his fellow firefighters before the towers fell.

"He went to work, and he never came back," says his stepfather, Russell Mercer.

Kristin Chenoweth has starred on Broadway in Wicked and on television in Pushing Daisies and The West Wing. We've invited Chenoweth, who is 4 feet 11 inches, to answer three questions about 6-foot-1 model and actress Brigitte Nielsen, who is perhaps most famous for her brief marriage to Sylvester Stallone. Click the audio link above to find out how she does.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte steps out of his limousine upon arrival at Merdeka Palace to meet Indonesian counterpart Joko Widodo in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 9, 2016.
Dita Alangkara / AP

The world’s eyes turned to the Philippines this week after President Rodrigo Duterte made disparaging remarks about President Obama during his visit to Asia. It’s not the first time Duterte’s comments have made international news since he took office in June, previously criticizing the U.S. and U.K.

Ben Felder / The Oklahoman / Twitter

The Oklahoma City Fire Department responded to a deadly accident at a construction site in downtown Oklahoma City on Friday.

A construction worker fell 14 stories at the Bank of Oklahoma building that's under construction at the intersection North Walker Avenue and Sheridan Avenue.

FiveThirtyEight compared Oklahoma's fault line locations to wastewater disposal well sites to see if it helps explain why north-central portions of the state have seen a recent uptick in seismic activity.

Germany's Fabian Hambuechen, Britain's Nile Wilson, and United States' Danell Leyva celebrate during the medal ceremony for horizontal bar during 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Aug. 16, 2016.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

An Olympic hallmark since the 1932 games, the Olympic Village in Rio de Janeiro hosted University of Oklahoma men’s gymnastics coach Mark Williams and his team this summer. Of all the spectacles he saw in Brazil, Williams found the facility one of the most striking.

“The Olympic village is just an amazing place. You can sit down and have lunch and have five different languages in your ear,” Williams said. “One day I just started to count, and I think I got up to 35 different countries represented within about 100 feet of me.”

Doors are closed at ITT Technical Institute’s campus inside 50 Penn Place in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuch / The Journal Record

Earlier this week ITT Technical Institute immediately closed every campus across the country. Filings last year with the Securities and Exchange Commission show that affects nearly 45,000 sites, including two in Oklahoma.  – one in Oklahoma City, the other in Tulsa.

A 5.8-magnitude earthquake rocked Oklahoma on Saturday, prompting Gov. Mary Fallin to declare a state of emergency. On Wednesday, officials said it was the strongest quake in the state’s history.

The quake followed a string of thousands of smaller tremors that have raised questions about the impact of drilling for oil and gas, and the controversial technique of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking.

Mona Denney surveys earthquake damage inside her home near Pawnee, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. Geological Survey is upgrading the strength of an earthquake that shook the state on Sept. 3 to 5.8 magnitude. That change makes the Labor Day weekend temblor the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in Oklahoma. The quake is the latest in a seismic surge researchers say has largely been fueled by the oil industry practice of pumping waste fluid into underground disposal wells.

Midwest City-Del City Superintendent Rick Cobb walks through an unfinished classroom at Parkview Elementary School Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma public schools issued hundreds of millions of dollars in debt last year through a risky financing scheme that may be unconstitutional.

Over the past dozen years, more Oklahoma schools have issued lease revenue bonds as a way to raise money for school construction and equipment. But finance experts told lawmakers on Wednesday that the state constitution doesn’t allow it.

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