The Two-Way
11:41 am
Wed March 6, 2013

How To Sneak Into A Chinese Village When Police Don't Want You There

When residents of the southern Chinese village of Shangpu staged an uprising, police set up a roadblock on the main road to keep outsiders away, including reporters. Here, a policeman mans the roadblock on Saturday.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

On occasion my job requires me to sneak into a Chinese village as I did earlier this week to report a story on a rural uprising. This does not come naturally. I'm 6-foot-2 with gray hair and blue eyes and don't look remotely like a Chinese farmer.

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Europe Hits Microsoft With $731 Million Fine Over Browser Options

Microsoft Corp CEO Steve Ballmer speaks during a keynote address at the 2013 International CES in January.
David Becker Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:37 am

Some sloppy coding on an update to Microsoft's Windows 7 two years ago has cost the computer giant a $731 million fine to the European Commission.

Microsoft said Wednesday it would not contest the fine, imposed for what the commission said was the company's abuse of its market dominance to stifle competitors' Web browsers.

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Shots - Health News
11:03 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Why ER Docs In The Big Apple Won't Replace That Painkiller Prescription

Posters like this one tell patients in New York City emergency rooms what to expect when it comes to painkiller prescriptions.
New York City Health Department

Early this year, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said public hospitals there would take steps to reduce overdoses and abuse of opioid painkillers.

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Politics
10:55 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Exit Interview: US Trade Representative Ron Kirk

Look around your kitchen table and you'll see the work of Ambassador Ron Kirk. He's the United States Trade Representative, which is a cabinet-level position, and he's negotiated trade deals all around the world. Host Michel Martin talks to him about why he's choosing to step down from his post and the importance of U.S. trade.

Education
10:55 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Where Kids Go When Neighborhood Schools Close

A rash of public school closings in some U.S. cities has parents and teachers reeling. School officials say the closings are needed to save money, but some argue it's a form of discrimination. Host Michel Martin talks with a Chicago reporter and a Philadelphia activist about how the closings could affect students and local communities.

Latin America
10:55 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Any Praise For Hugo Chavez?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, officials in a number of major cities around the country are looking to close public schools to save money, but some parents and activists say the cost of that move is higher than you might think. We'll talk with a reporter and an activist in her city in just a minute.

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Krulwich Wonders...
10:54 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Neil Tyson Pounds The Table, Demanding A Future, Now!

Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

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All Tech Considered
9:51 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Why The Library Of Congress Has A Lock On Your Phone

A law designed to protect copyrights on music and movies put digital locks on all sorts of things.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:56 am

What it means to own something in the digital age is being re-negotiated.

Few of us own the music we listen to or the movies we watch in exactly the same way we did a decade ago. And today if you buy a smartphone from a cellphone company, what you can legally do with it — how and where you can use it — may be proscribed even if that phone is fully bought and paid for.

I keep a lot of music on my phone. I have the Stones, Janis Joplin and OK Go.

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The Two-Way
9:42 am
Wed March 6, 2013

South Korea Vows Retaliation If Pyongyang Makes Good On Military Threat

A U.S. Marine takes part in a winter drill in South Korea last month.
Jung Yeon-je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:12 am

South Korea upped the ante Wednesday after Pyongyang threatened to scrap the armistice that ended a brutal war between the rival neighbors in 1953, promising retaliation for any North Korean attack.

"If North Korea carries out provocations that threaten the lives and safety of South Koreans, our military will carry out strong and resolute retaliations," South Korea's Gen. Kim Yong-hyun told reporters in Seoul.

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World Views
9:04 am
Wed March 6, 2013

On Our Way to “Waterworld” In Less than 40 Years

The sea ice atop the Arctic Ocean can—as shown in this photograph from July 12, 2011—look more like Swiss cheese or a bright coastal wetland.
Credit NASA Goddard Photo and Video / Flickr

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise's interview with Climate Institute President and CEO John Topping

A new study out this week finds that ice-free passage from North America to Asia directly over the North Pole could be possible after 2049.

UCLA geographers Laurence Smith and Scott Stephenson published the study Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

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