NPR Story
12:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

What A Mississippi Baby Can Tell HIV Researchers

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 1:53 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Now this week, doctors announced a breakthrough in HIV research. A Mississippi toddler who was born with the virus appears to have been cured. Doctors credit an aggressive regimen of anti-retroviral drugs administered just after the girl was born. This is the second well-documented case of someone being cured. The other involved a middle-aged San Francisco man who received a bone marrow transplant from a donor who was genetically resistant to HIV.

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NPR Story
12:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

A Shifting Tide For Gay Athletes In Professional Sports?

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 7:45 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro, in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Last week, two pro football players asked the Supreme Court to support same-sex marriage. It was an unusual moment for the NFL. Not long ago, nobody in pro sports talked publicly about sexual orientation, and now the issue seems to be everywhere.

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NPR Story
12:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Drones Come Home, Privacy Concerns Fly High

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 7:45 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington, filling in for Neal Conan. It's a bird! It's a plane! Nope, it's an unmanned aircraft, also called a drone. Some can be as small as a microwave. Others can recognize a tennis shoe from 60,000 feet above the ground. And now, law enforcement agencies across the country are getting approval from the federal government to use these mechanical eyeballs here in the U.S.

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The Salt
12:16 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Give Me Liberty, And Give Me Government-Subsidized Broccoli

Most people polled in a new survey said government programs to make fresh fruits and vegetables more affordable sound like a great idea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 11:32 am

Americans are all for government efforts to get them to eat more healthfully, as long as they don't feel like they're being bullied into it. That's what people said in a new survey about government efforts to influence how we eat, like New York City's ban on supersized sodas.

In the past decade, state and federal governments have launched dozens of new laws and programs to promote healthful eating and exercise. They've put a lot of effort into measuring what works, but surprisingly little effort into finding out what the people at the receiving end think.

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Music Reviews
11:37 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Ashley Monroe Is 'Like A Rose,' Briars And All

Jim Wright Warner Nashville

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 1:14 pm

The high lonesome sound of Ashley Monroe's Tennessee voice in "Like a Rose" serves as a clear signal that she's working within a tradition that extends back well beyond her twentysomething years on Earth. One of Monroe's collaborators in that song was Guy Clark, a seventysomething Texas country veteran who's often too tough-guy romantic for his own good.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Tue March 5, 2013

VW Introduces 'World's Most Efficient' Car At Geneva Motor Show

Two new Volkswagen hybrid XL1 model cars are displayed during a preview of Volkswagen ahead of the Geneva Car Show in Geneva.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

At the Geneva Motor Show on Tuesday, Volkswagen introduced a futuristic-looking car that the company says is the "world's most efficient."

VW's XL1 is a two seater, plug-in, diesel hybrid that the company says gets 261 miles per gallon "with an all-electric driving range of a little over 30 miles," CNN reports.

CNN adds:

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Planet Money
11:19 am
Tue March 5, 2013

The Dow Isn't Really At A Record High (And It Wouldn't Matter If It Were)

Related: The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is increasingly irrelevant to the stock market. But a picture of a room full of computers would be super boring.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 5:28 pm

Just a quick, cranky reminder: Despite what you may have read, the Dow Jones industrial average did not hit a new high today in any meaningful sen

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The Two-Way
11:10 am
Tue March 5, 2013

U.S. Speedskating Investigating Sexual Abuse Allegations

Speedskater Bridie Farrell competing last Friday in Kearns, Utah. Now 31, she says she was 15 when a much older teammate began sexually abusing her.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 2:17 pm

Yet another scandal has hit U.S. Speedskating (USS), which governs the sport with the biggest haul of winter Olympic medals for Team USA.

The USS board announced Monday night that it is investigating allegations of sexual abuse involving short track silver medalist Andy Gabel, now 48, who also once served as president of USS.

"U.S. Speedskating will not tolerate abuse of any kind and we intend to investigate these claims, and any others that arise, thoroughly," the group said in a written statement.

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Parenting
11:03 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Not Having Kids Bad For The Economy?

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:32 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the part of the program where we usually check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and parenting advice. Today, though, we decided on a very different conversation about choosing not to be a parent.

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Study Finds Climate Change To Open Arctic Sea Routes By 2050

An iceberg in or just outside the Ilulissat fjord, which likely calved from Jakobshavn Isbrae, the fastest glacier in western Greenland, in May 2012. Polar ice sheets are now melting three times faster than in the 1990s.
Ian Joughin AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 12:22 pm

Climate change will make commercial shipping possible from North America to Russia or Asia over the North Pole by the middle of the century, a new study says.

Two researchers at the University of California ran seven different climate models simulating two classes of vessels to see if they could make a relatively ice-free passage through the Arctic Ocean. In each case, the sea routes are sufficiently clear after 2049, they say.

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