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Manchester Concert Bombing: What We Know Tuesday

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET A bombing at the end of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, has killed 22 people and injured 59 more, police say. Monday night's concert had drawn thousands of children and young people — many of whom were trying to leave when the blast hit. The bomber died at Manchester Arena, police say. Greater Manchester Police have identified Salman Abedi, 22, as the suspected suicide bomber. Earlier on Tuesday, police said they were trying to learn whether the...

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RambergMediaImages / Flickr Creative Commons

The Cherokee Nation is seeking restitution for a drug abuse epidemic that has disproportionately affected members of its tribe.

The nation filed a lawsuit against major pharmaceutical companies and pharmacy retailers in tribal court on Thursday, alleging that these companies have unjustly profited off of selling medically unnecessary amounts of prescription opioids.

The Wormy Dog Saloon at 311 E. Sheridan Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

A Bricktown music venue that has showcased many red dirt and up-and-coming country artists is closing its doors.

The Wormy Dog Saloon will close at the end of April. Levelland Productions, which leases the venue, informed the property’s owner, Brewer Entertainment, in December that they will not renew their lease.

On the 22nd anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, roses, wreaths and teddy bears decorated chairs representing the children killed at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995. There are 168 chairs in total—one for each adult and child w
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

It’s been more than two decades since a truck full of explosives destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring hundreds more.

Oklahoma Schools Beset by High Principal Turnover

Apr 18, 2017
Brad Gibson / Oklahoma Watch

For decades, principals have come and gone at Tulsa’s McLain High School so frequently, it’s nearly unheard of for a student to complete all four years of high school without seeing a new face in the principal’s office.

The school has had at least 11 principals or co-principals since 2000 and now is losing yet another one, who, after three years in the job, is leaving after the school year.

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City’s police union, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123, is pushing the city’s police department to put more officers on the streets.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

The state of Oklahoma has changed its definition of marijuana to exclude federally approved treatments containing cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in the plant.  

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

 

 

 

Justice Neil Gorsuch begins hearing arguments at the Supreme Court today, after a lengthy confirmation process that divided the United States Senate. His tenure on the Supreme Court has only just begun, but it could have a major impact on the court’s political leanings in years to come.  

Generations ago, the American Indian Osage tribe was compelled to move. Not for the first time, white settlers pushed them off their land in the 1800s. They made their new home in a rocky, infertile area in northeast Oklahoma in hopes that settlers would finally leave them alone.

As it turned out, the land they had chosen was rich in oil, and in the early 20th century, members of the tribe became spectacularly wealthy. They bought cars and built mansions; they made so much oil money that the government began appointing white guardians to "help" them spend it.

John Pansze, of Yukon, applies makeup to get into character as Sponji the Clown.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 


Viral videos of weapon-wielding, scary clowns are hurting the bottom line for local clowns. Event bookings have plummeted, and even adult parties are cancelling because a guest has a fear of clowns.

http://saragoldrickrab.com/

More people want to pursue higher education now in the United States, and more students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds want to go to college or university. Even though a desire to achieve higher education is greater, it has also created enormous problems, according to Temple University education and sociology professor Sara Goldrick-Rab.

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