Penny Reynolds, executive director of Sisu Youth, hopes to secure funding to open a 10-bed night shelter at Church of the Open Arms in Oklahoma City.
Trevor Brown / Oklahoma Watch

Many Beds For Oklahoma's Homeless Youths Remain Empty

The five bunk beds, each with a white pillow and tightly fitted sheets, sit empty in the basement of the Church of the Open Arms in northwest Oklahoma City. Nearby shelves hold donated clothing, cleaning products and young-adult novels. All are waiting to be used by homeless teenagers. But for months, the beds and items have been sitting untouched by the young. That is dismaying to Penny Reynolds, who heads a nonprofit youth-advocacy group, Sisu Youth, that set up the overnight shelter at the...
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In this photo taken Friday, Feb. 12, 2016, assistant teacher D'onna Hartman smiles as she works with children at the Creative Kids Learning Center, a school that focuses on pre-kindergarten for 4- and 5-year-olds, in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson / AP

A new study finds the country’s system for training, compensating and supporting early childhood educators is neither effective nor equitable. The Early Childhood Workforce Index report from the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California found low wages and inconsistent expectations threaten early educators’ well-being, and the effectiveness of their work.

The report also faulted the lack of standard educational requirements.

The restored Electric Transformer House at 2412 North Olie Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The latest update of the National Register of Historic Places includes the kinds of Oklahoma buildings you’d expect to be on such a list: a school in Atoka built for black students during the New Deal era, a church in Garfield County barely altered since its construction in 1928, a hotel in Guymon that’s been the tallest building in town for nearly 70 years.

But not all of the properties on the list immediately flash their historic value, like a nondescript one-room brick building in Oklahoma City called the Electric Transformer House.

Donald Trump is expected to announce his running mate any day now, and speculation is swirling about whom he might pick.

A vice presidential choice is a critical one for the Republican presumptive nominee. Not only has he never held elective office, but he still hasn't united his party around his controversial candidacy. More social media missteps this week and comments praising former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein unsettled GOP leaders even more.

Workers repair a water pipeline in north Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City's population continues to grow, but its residents are actually using less water than a few years ago.

The results of the city's latest water consumption survey show average residential use has fallen 3.4 percent since last year, The Journal Record’s Brian Brus reports:

Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller talks to reporters in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Miller said Oklahoma is muddling through a continued economic downturn.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oil and natural gas production tax collections increased slightly over the past two months, although they're still well below this time last year.

Gross receipts for the month of June were $925.7 million, or 7.4 percent lower than the June 2015 total.

Fire crews work to reduce wildfire danger by clear brush through a prescribed burn in northwestern Oklahoma in April 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Fire crews worked for nearly a week to contain a wildfire that started on March 22 and torched 574 square miles of land near the Oklahoma-Kansas state line, where it destroyed homes, killed livestock and damaged thousands of miles of fence.

On Monday, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett became president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Over the weekend, the group met in Indianapolis to elect Cornett and lay out a broad policy agenda for the next year -- much of which focused on advocating in Washington. Mayors will focus on pushing for congressional funding to combat the Zika virus, improve infrastructure and treat opioid addiction.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., talks with Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla. on Nov. 4, 2014 shortly after his election to the U.S. Senate
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Several Oklahoma U.S. Senators and House members say they’re disappointed FBI Director James Comey recommended the U.S. Department of Justice not prosecute presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Oklahoma’s senior Republican U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe called Clinton’s use of a private email server "obvious intentional mishandling."

Thomas Weiss addressing a retreat of UN under-secretaries-general on “The Imperative of Change” at the World Economic Forum, Geneva, April 6, 2016.
Sallysharif / Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders.

“Whether it’s climate change, terrorism, proliferation, Ebola, it simply is impossible for states, no matter how powerful or un-powerful, to address these problems,” Weiss told KGOU’s World Views.

Traffic passes by the parking garage at the Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City campus.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Three years ago, Oklahoma changed its workers’ compensation laws by saying that a person has to be clocked in or injured on the premises for the benefits to kick in. But the Oklahoma Supreme Court is raising questions about what it means to be at work.

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