Republican Debate: 5 Things You Missed

Saturday's GOP debate was the final one before Tuesday's New Hampshire primary. Here were five key moments:1. That awkward startOne key thing has to happen before the debate starts: the candidates have to take the stage.That proved more complicated than usual on Saturday night, as the ABC News Republican debate began with Ben Carson refusing to walk out to his podium, even after the moderators called his name.Called second, Carson stood and waited, allowing Ted Cruz to go out after him. Makin...
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U.S. Sen. James Lankford chairs a 2015 Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs and Federal Management hearing
SenatorLankford / Flickr

U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) says former Secretary of State and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server during her tenure at the State Department represents a national security threat.

Spokesman Mark Toner says the State Department will make many of the 9,400 still-unseen emails public this week, but the agency wants a one-month extension of its court-mandated January 29 deadline to unveil the electronic communication.

A billboard along Interstate 35 in Oklahoma City advertises the latest Powerball and Mega Millions lottery jackpots on Thursday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The rush to win last week’s record-breaking Powerball jackpot also sent extra cash to the state’s education system.

From left to right: David Prater, Kris Steele, John Whetsel, Terri White and Clay Bennett participate in a forum Wednesday, Dec. 2, about Oklahoma County's criminal justice system.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Last month the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber outlined a new approach to decrease Oklahoma County’s overcrowded jail population and increase public safety.

A sales tax exemption approved in 2005 applies to electricity used in "waterflood" oil recovery projects in older fields, such as the Glenn Pool field shown above, with Sapulpa in the distance.
Oklahoma Historical Society

An obscure sales tax break authored by Oklahoma’s Senate leader is subsidizing an expensive form of enhanced oil recovery for seven companies, including the senator’s employer.

The tax break on electricity used to power old “waterflood” recovery projects was authored in 2005 by now-Senate President Pro Tempore Brian Bingman, R-Sapulpa.

The first company to apply for and receive the exemption was Uplands Resources Inc. of Tulsa. At the time, Bingman was the company’s land manager. He currently works there as vice president of land and operations.

Karen Holp and Laura Knoll/KGOU

January 24, 2016

This is from the Manager's Desk.   

As each semester starts at the University of Oklahoma, I like to introduce the students working at KGOU. First, let me introduce our paid student staff members.

Cesia Rascon will continue as the calendar editor, and her work is reflected in the events section of the KGOU web page. Richard Bassett also continues as our digital music and production producer. We may have a few more student hires in the next weeks.

Oklahoma Water Resources Board project coordinator Jason Murphy samples water in the frigid Canadian River east of Oklahoma City.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma's economy runs on oil. The energy industry drives 1 in 5 jobs and is tied to almost every type of tax source, so falling oil prices have rippled into a state budget crisis.

Crude oil prices have dropped more than 70 percent, and that's created problems across government agencies in Oklahoma. Jason Murphy is a project coordinator for the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. He slides on a pair of waders, unspools a sensor probe and splashes into the frigid Canadian River east of Oklahoma City.

The Hugo water treatment plant in July.
Sarah Terry-Cobo / The Journal Record

The company that provides water services in Hugo says a customer doesn’t have standing to sue over water quality problems. Hugo resident Tara Lowrimore is suing Severn Trent Environmental Services for damages related to federal and state drinking water violations due to cloudiness and lack of chlorination.

backpacks
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Four stories that were trending or generated discussion online or on KGOU’s social media platforms during the past week.

Teachers and education supporters rally at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City in March 2015, asking for better pay.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

State. Sen. David Holt is proposing $10,000 teacher pay raises over the next few years, and says it’s possible without raising taxes.

His plan is three-pronged. School districts would be consolidated and excess money would go to teacher pay. All revenue growth after fiscal year 2017 would go directly to raises, and the state would find another $200 million by reforming tax credits.

Holt said legislators have a moral obligation to raise pay, and help solve the teacher shortage.

A crowd gathers outside the Oklahoma County courtroom to await the sentencing of Daniel Holtzclaw on Thursday afternoon.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Daniel Holtzclaw’s victims and their supporters emerged from the courtroom Thursday, declaring  justice had been served. Moments earlier, officers had led a silent Holtzclaw, shackled and wearing prison orange, to serve the rest of his life in prison.

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