OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
10:22 am
Fri April 17, 2015

That April Morning: The Oklahoma City Bombing

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum
Brian Hardzinski KGOU

The bomb that destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City killed 168 people - including 19 children. It injured hundreds more, and forever shaped the community.

April 19, 1995 started as an idyllic spring morning - clear skies, calm winds - better than most Wednesdays during the state’s usually-turbulent severe weather season. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Workers showed up to their jobs, and went about their regular routines.

That all changed at 9:02 a.m.

Read more
OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
8:14 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma's Congressional Delegation Reflects On Murrah Bombing Anniversary

Oklahoma's longest-serving Congressman led the state's delegation on the House floor in Washington Thursday to reflect on the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing as the 20th anniversary approaches.

U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas was a freshman lawmaker representing Oklahoma's now-defunct Sixth Congressional District that included downtown Oklahoma City.

Read more
StoryCorps
7:24 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Anniversary Of Oklahoma City Bombing Reopens Wounds For Survivors

Phuong Nguyen, 55, and her son, Chris, who survived the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:05 pm

On the morning of April 19, 1995, a truck bomb exploded at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The blast — equal to 4,000 pounds of TNT — killed 168 people and injured hundreds more.

The federal office building also housed a day care center. The explosives-laden truck was parked directly beneath it. Of the 21 children there that morning, only six survived.

Read more
Business Intelligence Report
6:37 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Technological And Engineering Lessons From The Oklahoma City Bombing

An American Red Cross volunteer hugs a victim after the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995.
Credit Provided / American Red Cross

All this week we’ve looked back at the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building as the 20th anniversary approaches – from some of the lingering mental health issues, to a new play that tells survivors’ stories, to how the recovery from the tragedy sparked downtown Oklahoma City’s renaissance.

On April 19, four employees of the Oklahoma Historical Society were injured while working in the Journal Record building across the street from the Murrah building. They ended up in four different hospitals, with little to no way to coordinate communication. That’s one of the biggest challenges the American Red Cross faced that day, according to The Journal Record’s Kirby Lee Davis:

Read more
OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
5:48 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Sneak Preview: "That April Morning - The Oklahoma City Bombing"

It's been nearly 20 years since a bomb destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in downtown Oklahoma City. The aftermath of the tragedy continues to reverberate through the city and shape the character of the state.

Friday morning at 11 a.m. KGOU will debut a new documentary called That April Morning: The Oklahoma City Bombing. We've produced this sneak peak:

Read more
History
6:40 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Family Of Unaccounted For USS Oklahoma Sailor Wouldn't 'Let Him Go'

Edwin Hopkins with his mother, Alice, and father, Frank Jr. Hopkins was killed aboard the USS Oklahoma during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, but his remains never were identified.
Courtesy Tom Gray

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 10:14 am

The Defense Department announced Tuesday that it will exhume the remains of 388 sailors and Marines who were buried as "unknowns." The men were killed when Japanese torpedoes sank the USS Oklahoma on Dec. 7, 1941, during the attacks on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

Read more
OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
5:20 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing Juror Looks Back

The McVeigh jury members address the media during a news conference in Denver, Colo., Saturday, June 14, 1997. From right to left are: Roger Brown, Fred Clarke, Doug Carr, Diane Faircloth, James Osgood, Tonya Stedman, Mike Leeper, Ruth Meier, Jonathon Candelaria, Martha Hite and Vera Chubb. (Michael S. Green/AP)

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:03 am

Just past the two-year anniversary of the bombing of the Boston Marathon, another horrific anniversary approaches. Oklahoma City residents will never forget April 19, 1995, when a bomb blast tore through the Alfred P. Murrah federal building, killing 168 people and injuring several hundred others.

Police tracked down Timothy McVeigh, a 26-year-old Persian Gulf War veteran and right-wing militia sympathizer. He was put on trial and ultimately put to death.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Adrian Peterson To Be Reinstated By NFL

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson (center) is seen following a court appearance last year in Conroe, Texas.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:15 pm

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The NFL has announced that Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson will be reinstated Friday as "an active NFL player and may participate in all scheduled activities with the Vikings."

Read more
World Views
3:02 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Ex-Washington Post Journalist Recounts Abu Ghraib, Close Call With Al-Qaeda Kidnappers

Jackie Spinner interviews a soldier in Iraq during her time as a Washington Post correspondent.
Provided Jackie Spinner

In 2003, the Associated Press issued its report on human rights abuses taking place at the U.S.-held Abu Ghraib prison. Jackie Spinner was at the prison a year later to report on the story for The Washington Post when she was nearly kidnapped by Al-Qaeda members.

“It was June 14, 2004. It’s a day I’ll never forget,” Spinner said.

The event inspired the title for her 2006 book about her experiences reporting in Iraq during the war, Tell Them I Didn’t Cry

Read more
OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
12:15 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

How The Oklahoma City Bombing Helped Spur Downtown's Two-Decade Renaissance

Bill Mihas, the owner of Coney Island in downtown Oklahoma City
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

It’s been nearly 20 years since a bomb destroyed the Murrah building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring hundreds more. As Oklahoma City prepares to look back on the bombing, one thing is clear — downtown OKC is a far different, and much better place than it was in April 1995. And it’s hard to deny the role the bombing played in the area’s resurgence.

Read more

Pages