Jim Thorpe at New York's Polo Grounds in 1913.
Bain News Service / Library of Congress

Supreme Court Rejects Appeal To Move Jim Thorpe's Remains To Oklahoma

On the first day of its fall term, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal from the Sac and Fox Nation and Jim Thorpe’s sons to move the athlete’s remains back to Oklahoma. On Monday, the high court left a ruling in place that ordered Thorpe’s body to remain in the Pennsylvania town named after the Olympic gold medalist. His two surviving sons and the tribe had wanted to move Thorpe back to Native American land in Oklahoma. Read and listen to KGOU’s documentary about the controversy...
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Since a Snapchat video of University of Oklahoma football player Eric Striker's response to Sigma Alpha Epsilon's racist chant went viral, ESPN interviewed more than 40 players from 15 programs across the country and surveyed another 99 players anonymously about their reaction to Striker and their own encounters with racism and profiling. Many players applauded Striker for speaking out and were eager to share their own opinions and experiences that mirror his at Oklahoma.

prison bars
mikecogh / Flickr Creative Commons

The head of an Oklahoma prison workers group says the stabbing deaths of four white inmates at a private prison in Cushing were the result of violence between two white prison gangs that also spilled over into other state prisons.

Several Oklahoma farmers wander through a field of broad-leafed cover crops during a state Conservation Commission workshop in Dewey County in western Oklahoma.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Generations of tilling and planting on the same land have left Oklahoma’s soil in poor shape. And if farmers don’t change the way they grow crops, feeding the future won’t be easy. As Slapout, Okla., farmer Jordan Shearer puts it: “We’re creating a desert environment by plowing the damn ground.”

Taking A Toll

Oklahoma state flag
J Stephen Conn / Flickr.com

The U.S. Department of Justice has awarded more than $12.5 million to 13 Oklahoma tribes to improve public safety and programs for crime victims.

They grants are among 206 national awards totaling more than $97 million announced Wednesday for American Indian tribes, Alaska Native villages, tribal consortia and tribal designees.

In the five years since earthquakes first began blitzing Oklahoma, state officials have been hesitant to agree with scientists who blamed the oil and gas industry.

The shaking doesn't appear to be slowing, but the regulatory response is ramping up as more state officials acknowledge the link between increased seismic activity and waste fluid pumped into the disposal wells of oil fields.

To show how an oil and gas boom fueled a massive surge of earthquakes, scientists used algorithms, statistics and computer models of fluid flow and seismic energy.

Court Halts Oklahoma Execution

Sep 16, 2015

1 p.m. Update: The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals has granted Richard Glossip a two-week stay of execution.

Oklahoma is scheduled to execute Richard Glossip at 3 p.m. Central time today, despite new evidence that suggests he may be innocent.

Glossip was convicted in the 1997 murder of Barry Van Treese, based on testimony from Justin Sneed, who claimed Glossip hired him for the murder. Sneed was a convicted murder who struck a plea bargain to avoid execution himself.

Supporters of Richard Glossip celebrate outside the Oklahoma State Penitentiary after they learned he was granted a stay of execution.
Cheridan Sanders / Twitter

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals granted a last-minute stay of execution Wednesday to Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip, a little over three hours before he was set to die by lethal injection.

Updated 3:03 p.m.

Standing outside the Oklahoma State Penitentiary, anti-death penalty advocate Sister Helen Prejean said the two extra weeks will give Richard Glossip’s lawyers time to present what they say is new evidence that will clear his name.

Alton Nolen in a 2011 photo from the Oklahoma Department of Corrections
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

An Oklahoma judge has ordered a jury trial to determine whether a man charged in the beheading death of a co-worker is mentally competent to be tried for first-degree murder.

Cleveland County District Judge Lori Walkley scheduled an Oct. 26 competency trial for 31-year-old Alton Nolen, who is charged in the Sept. 25, 2014, slaying of 54-year-old Colleen Hufford at a food processing plant in Moore.

homeless person holding a sign
AR McLin / Flickr

The Oklahoma City Council voted unanimously Tuesday morning to introduce an ordinance that prohibits panhandlers on medians.

Tucker Tower is an 80-year-old landmark along the shores of Lake Murray.

State tourism officials are considering plans for an outdoor sports shooting complex at Lake Murray State Park, the oldest, largest and most popular state park in Oklahoma.

The proposal has generated some complaints that a gun range could disturb the ambiance of the park.

The shooting range, modeled after one being built in South Carolina, would be located next to a new state lodge now under construction in the 12,500-acre park.