Renovation continues on the Sunshine Cleaners building at 1012 NW First St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Sunshine Cleaners Redevelopment Moves Forward; Quapaw Casino Goes Farm-To-Fork To Woo Millennials

In April the Oklahoma City Council approved $550,000 in tax increment financing, or TIF money, for the dilapidated Sunshine Cleaners building just west of downtown. About the only remarkable thing about the building two blocks from the Oklahoma County Jail is its beautiful neon sign. The roof has caved in, the windows are broken, and satellite imagery even shows an abandoned vehicle inside the building. The money still has to be approved by the Oklahoma City, but The Journal Record’s editor...
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The restored Electric Transformer House at 2412 North Olie Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The latest update of the National Register of Historic Places includes the kinds of Oklahoma buildings you’d expect to be on such a list: a school in Atoka built for black students during the New Deal era, a church in Garfield County barely altered since its construction in 1928, a hotel in Guymon that’s been the tallest building in town for nearly 70 years.

But not all of the properties on the list immediately flash their historic value, like a nondescript one-room brick building in Oklahoma City called the Electric Transformer House.

Donald Trump is expected to announce his running mate any day now, and speculation is swirling about whom he might pick.

A vice presidential choice is a critical one for the Republican presumptive nominee. Not only has he never held elective office, but he still hasn't united his party around his controversial candidacy. More social media missteps this week and comments praising former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein unsettled GOP leaders even more.

Workers repair a water pipeline in north Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City's population continues to grow, but its residents are actually using less water than a few years ago.

The results of the city's latest water consumption survey show average residential use has fallen 3.4 percent since last year, The Journal Record’s Brian Brus reports:

Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller talks to reporters in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Miller said Oklahoma is muddling through a continued economic downturn.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oil and natural gas production tax collections increased slightly over the past two months, although they're still well below this time last year.

Gross receipts for the month of June were $925.7 million, or 7.4 percent lower than the June 2015 total.

Fire crews work to reduce wildfire danger by clear brush through a prescribed burn in northwestern Oklahoma in April 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Fire crews worked for nearly a week to contain a wildfire that started on March 22 and torched 574 square miles of land near the Oklahoma-Kansas state line, where it destroyed homes, killed livestock and damaged thousands of miles of fence.

On Monday, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett became president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Over the weekend, the group met in Indianapolis to elect Cornett and lay out a broad policy agenda for the next year -- much of which focused on advocating in Washington. Mayors will focus on pushing for congressional funding to combat the Zika virus, improve infrastructure and treat opioid addiction.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., talks with Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla. on Nov. 4, 2014 shortly after his election to the U.S. Senate
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Several Oklahoma U.S. Senators and House members say they’re disappointed FBI Director James Comey recommended the U.S. Department of Justice not prosecute presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Oklahoma’s senior Republican U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe called Clinton’s use of a private email server "obvious intentional mishandling."

Thomas Weiss addressing a retreat of UN under-secretaries-general on “The Imperative of Change” at the World Economic Forum, Geneva, April 6, 2016.
Sallysharif / Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders.

“Whether it’s climate change, terrorism, proliferation, Ebola, it simply is impossible for states, no matter how powerful or un-powerful, to address these problems,” Weiss told KGOU’s World Views.

Traffic passes by the parking garage at the Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City campus.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Three years ago, Oklahoma changed its workers’ compensation laws by saying that a person has to be clocked in or injured on the premises for the benefits to kick in. But the Oklahoma Supreme Court is raising questions about what it means to be at work.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

A waning number of applicants, coupled with a dramatic cut in state funds, is throwing into reverse Teach for America’s efforts to place teachers in public-school classrooms in Oklahoma.

The national program recruits college graduates and professionals to commit to a two-year stint in mostly low-income, struggling schools.

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