Jim Thorpe at New York's Polo Grounds in 1913.
Bain News Service / Library of Congress

Supreme Court Rejects Appeal To Move Jim Thorpe's Remains To Oklahoma

On the first day of its fall term, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal from the Sac and Fox Nation and Jim Thorpe’s sons to move the athlete’s remains back to Oklahoma. On Monday, the high court left a ruling in place that ordered Thorpe’s body to remain in the Pennsylvania town named after the Olympic gold medalist. His two surviving sons and the tribe had wanted to move Thorpe back to Native American land in Oklahoma. Read and listen to KGOU’s documentary about the controversy...
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Welcome to the third session of the Morning Edition book club! Here's how it works: A well-known writer will pick a book he or she loved. We'll all read it. Then, you'll send us your questions about the book. About a month later, we'll reconvene to talk about the book with the author and the writer who picked it.

DonkeyHotey / Flickr

At least three people want to be the next chairman of the Oklahoma Republican Party.

The Tulsa World reports that party Vice Chairwoman Estela Hernandez, Robert Hubbard of Yukon and Pam Pollard of Midwest City are seeking the post that became vacant when former state Sen. Randy Brogdon of Owasso stepped down as chairman.

Hernandez is serving as interim chairwoman. The 38-year-old Hernandez, who owns a small business with her husband, says she wants to build relationships within the party and will be an effective fundraiser.

Three earthquakes have shaken parts of central and northern Oklahoma in less than one hour.

The U.S. Geological Survey said all three quakes were recorded Monday between 12:10 p.m. and 1:08 p.m.

The first was recorded about six miles north-northwest of Perry in Noble County, about 60 miles north of Oklahoma City. Geologists say the 2.6 magnitude earthquake occurred at a depth of about three miles.

Attorney Don Knight speaks to reporters during a state Capitol news conference Sept. 14, 2015.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Members of Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip's defense team presented what they say is newly discovered information in the case Monday morning.

The attorneys hope to stop Glossip's execution scheduled for Wednesday.

(L-R): Oklahoma Watch executive editor David Fritze, Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr., and Oklahoma City police chief Bill Citty during Tuesday night's forum at Kamp's 1910 Café.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

Oklahoma City residents crowded into a café in Midtown last month to discuss police and minority communities.

The event hosted by Oklahoma Watch raised questions about diversity within the police force.

Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr. spoke to the crowd about everything from the nationwide spike in police shootings to the racial makeup of the city’s police force, where the number of black officers stands at roughly 6 percent. Pettis voiced concerns that number would drop even lower in coming years as minority officers begin to retire.


September 13, 2015

This is from the Manager's Desk.   

I am not trying to be too personal right now, but I’d like to know what you are doing while you listen to KGOU. In other words, how do you KGOU?

Last week, I gave you a glance of my Saturday morning shopping to “Whad’Ya Know?” and my afternoon of household chores to the “Weekend Blues.” Now we would like to hear your voice, telling us how you listen.

Record yourself on your smart phone, and then record the sound surrounding you. Send it in and we’ll send you a special, limited edition “My KGOU” t-shirt.

Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Since the 1990s, Brazil has slowly positioned itself as a major economic world player. It’s been one of the fastest-growing economies in the world over the past two decades, with abundant natural resources and ongoing appreciation of its currency. Goldman Sachs economist Jim O’Neill coined the term BRIC in a 2001 paper to describe how Brazil, Russia, India, and China could become economic juggernauts by the year 2050.

Messages of support for migrants and refugees chalked on a wall in Budapest, Hungary - Sept. 3, 2015.
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung / Flickr

On Monday the 22 member states of the European Union plan to hold a special meeting in Brussels to discuss what to do about the hundreds of thousands of migrants fleeing areas of Iraq and Syria torn apart by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants.

European Union Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker wants the nearly two dozen countries to endorse a plan forcing member states to grant asylum to nearly 160,000 refugees fleeing the Middle East.

Chesapeake Energy's Oklahoma City campus
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

It's been an interesting year for Chesapeake Energy.

The Oklahoma City-based energy giant is involved in a lawsuit with the company's founder, Aubrey McClendon, over some hazy corporate law issues involving his new company - American Energy Partners.

pumping gas
futureatlas.com / Flickr Creative Commons

Gasoline prices across parts of Arkansas and Oklahoma are at some of their lowest levels in more than a decade, aiding consumers but worrying segments of the economy that rely on oil prices being high.

The Oklahoman reported Thursday that prices could fall to around $1.70 for a gallon of regular gasoline in Oklahoma by the end of the year, and the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette said nationwide prices could reach an average of $2.03 per gallon in December.