U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell at the Choctaw Nation headquarters in Durant, Okla. on Oct. 6, 2015.
Choctaw Nation

Federal Government, Oklahoma Tribes Reach $186M Settlement

The U.S. Department of the Interior and the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations agreed to a settlement on Tuesday to end long-running litigation regarding a lawsuit filed by the tribes regarding federal handling of tribal resources and funds held in government trust. Speaking at the ceremonial signing on Tuesday at Choctaw headquarters in Durant, Oklahoma, Bill Anoatubby, Governor of the Chickasaw Nation, said the settlement was a milestone in tribal and federal relations. “It is the beginning of a...
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Alton Nolen in a 2011 photo from the Oklahoma Department of Corrections
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

An Oklahoma judge has ordered a jury trial to determine whether a man charged in the beheading death of a co-worker is mentally competent to be tried for first-degree murder.

Cleveland County District Judge Lori Walkley scheduled an Oct. 26 competency trial for 31-year-old Alton Nolen, who is charged in the Sept. 25, 2014, slaying of 54-year-old Colleen Hufford at a food processing plant in Moore.

homeless person holding a sign
AR McLin / Flickr

The Oklahoma City Council voted unanimously Tuesday morning to introduce an ordinance that prohibits panhandlers on medians.

Tucker Tower is an 80-year-old landmark along the shores of Lake Murray.

State tourism officials are considering plans for an outdoor sports shooting complex at Lake Murray State Park, the oldest, largest and most popular state park in Oklahoma.

The proposal has generated some complaints that a gun range could disturb the ambiance of the park.

The shooting range, modeled after one being built in South Carolina, would be located next to a new state lodge now under construction in the 12,500-acre park.

Welcome to the third session of the Morning Edition book club! Here's how it works: A well-known writer will pick a book he or she loved. We'll all read it. Then, you'll send us your questions about the book. About a month later, we'll reconvene to talk about the book with the author and the writer who picked it.

DonkeyHotey / Flickr

At least three people want to be the next chairman of the Oklahoma Republican Party.

The Tulsa World reports that party Vice Chairwoman Estela Hernandez, Robert Hubbard of Yukon and Pam Pollard of Midwest City are seeking the post that became vacant when former state Sen. Randy Brogdon of Owasso stepped down as chairman.

Hernandez is serving as interim chairwoman. The 38-year-old Hernandez, who owns a small business with her husband, says she wants to build relationships within the party and will be an effective fundraiser.

Three earthquakes have shaken parts of central and northern Oklahoma in less than one hour.

The U.S. Geological Survey said all three quakes were recorded Monday between 12:10 p.m. and 1:08 p.m.

The first was recorded about six miles north-northwest of Perry in Noble County, about 60 miles north of Oklahoma City. Geologists say the 2.6 magnitude earthquake occurred at a depth of about three miles.

Attorney Don Knight speaks to reporters during a state Capitol news conference Sept. 14, 2015.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Members of Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip's defense team presented what they say is newly discovered information in the case Monday morning.

The attorneys hope to stop Glossip's execution scheduled for Wednesday.

(L-R): Oklahoma Watch executive editor David Fritze, Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr., and Oklahoma City police chief Bill Citty during Tuesday night's forum at Kamp's 1910 Café.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

Oklahoma City residents crowded into a café in Midtown last month to discuss police and minority communities.

The event hosted by Oklahoma Watch raised questions about diversity within the police force.

Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr. spoke to the crowd about everything from the nationwide spike in police shootings to the racial makeup of the city’s police force, where the number of black officers stands at roughly 6 percent. Pettis voiced concerns that number would drop even lower in coming years as minority officers begin to retire.


September 13, 2015

This is from the Manager's Desk.   

I am not trying to be too personal right now, but I’d like to know what you are doing while you listen to KGOU. In other words, how do you KGOU?

Last week, I gave you a glance of my Saturday morning shopping to “Whad’Ya Know?” and my afternoon of household chores to the “Weekend Blues.” Now we would like to hear your voice, telling us how you listen.

Record yourself on your smart phone, and then record the sound surrounding you. Send it in and we’ll send you a special, limited edition “My KGOU” t-shirt.

Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Since the 1990s, Brazil has slowly positioned itself as a major economic world player. It’s been one of the fastest-growing economies in the world over the past two decades, with abundant natural resources and ongoing appreciation of its currency. Goldman Sachs economist Jim O’Neill coined the term BRIC in a 2001 paper to describe how Brazil, Russia, India, and China could become economic juggernauts by the year 2050.