(L-R): Oklahoma Watch executive editor David Fritze, Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr., and Oklahoma City police chief Bill Citty during Tuesday night's forum at Kamp's 1910 Café.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

Oklahoma City Police Chief, Councilman Address Race, Policing Issues In Panel Discussion

Oklahoma City residents crowded into a café in Midtown Tuesday night to discuss police and minority communities. The event hosted by Oklahoma Watch raised questions about diversity within the police force. Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr. spoke to the crowd about everything from the nationwide spike in police shootings to the racial makeup of the city’s police force, where the number of black officers stands at roughly 6 percent. Pettis voiced concerns that number would drop...
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Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy added 215,000 jobs last month, just shy of the number forecast by economists. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 5.3 percent.

Wages were up slightly, and the number of long-term unemployed remained the same as June.

This past spring, 5 million students from third grade through high school took new, end-of-year tests in math and English that were developed by a consortium of states known as PARCC.

It's a big deal because these tests are aligned to the Common Core learning standards, and they're considered harder than many of the tests they replaced.

It's also a big deal because until last year, it was all but impossible to compare students across state lines. Not anymore.

Algae grow on the floor of the pipe room in the Hugo water plant because water leaks constantly, as shown in this late July photo.
Sarah Terry-Cobo / The Journal Record

About 7,000 residents in Hugo lived for months with unsafe drinking water because a private company improperly disinfected municipal water supplies and misreported data to local and state officials.

Folks attending a Chipotle Cultivate Festival in Kansas City on July 18 voted on their opinions after seeing an exhibit on genetically modified organisms.
Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

The Chipotle Cultivate Festival had it all: an indie pop band on stage, long lines at the beer booths, folks hanging out on a hot summer day.

Sort of like a Grateful Dead concert, only with free burritos.

But the Chipotle Cultivate events, with four held across the country this summer, aims to do a little more than just than just the classic summertime music festival. Billed as offering “food, ideas and music,” the festival offers a chance to “learn a free burrito” after going through four exhibits.

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing stricter regulations for pesticide applicators.

Under the guidelines, workers who spray some of the most hazardous pesticides would need to be at least 18 years old, renew their certifications every three years and take specialized training for certain chemicals.

Updated at 7:40 p.m.

The biggest punches thrown at the first GOP presidential debate of the evening were at candidates not on the consolation debate stage.

A man pinning a boutineer on his husband during a gay wedding in New York City.
erin m / Flickr

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt says the Internal Revenue Service has assured him it won't revoke the tax-exempt status of religious organizations after June's Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage.

OWRB water resources geologists Derrick Wagner and Jessica Correll analyze readings from their well at the Spencer Mesonet station.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Almost half of the water used by Oklahomans comes from aquifers, and four years of drought increased that reliance. This year’s record-setting rainfall filled up the state’s lakes, but recharging aquifers doesn’t happen so quickly.

James Rintamaki / Flickr

Both of Oklahoma's U.S. Senators sent a letter to Environmental Protection Agency administrator Gina McCarthy Wednesday requesting documents and clarification regarding the Waters of the United States rule.

Sister Helen Prejean at the Voices of Hope conference held in the Galway Bay Hotel in Galway, Ireland October 25-26, 2013.
Irish Jesuits / Flickr

Updated August 11, 6:11 a.m.

Gov. Mary Fallin plans to move forward with the execution of Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip despite calls for a stay of execution from death penalty opponents.

The governor said Monday two juries convicted Richard Glossip of murder and sentenced him to death, and that decision was reviewed and upheld by several courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court.

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