Arts and Entertainment

Newport Folk Festival
8:37 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

The Milk Carton Kids, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 2:41 pm

When they perform onstage as The Milk Carton Kids, Joey Ryan and Kenneth Pattengale are half Simon & Garfunkel, half Smothers Brothers: Their melancholic harmonies intertwine beautifully, while their playful, deadpan banter is worth the price of admission on its own.

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Newport Folk Festival
8:36 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

JD McPherson, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 2:35 pm

JD McPherson provides a refreshing reminder that retro roots music isn't timid: His debut album, Signs & Signifiers, synthesizes blues and rockabilly and old-school rock 'n' roll with an unmistakable punk spirit. Throughout the record, he finds the delicate balance between a classic, traditionalist sound and the understanding that the styles he's emulating are rooted in rebellion, menace and even danger.

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Theater
5:18 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Wallace Shawn: From 'Toy Story' Dino To Highbrow Playwright

Wallace Shawn (from left), Larry Pine and Deborah Eisenberg make up the cast of The Designated Mourner. Written by Shawn and directed by Andre Gregory, the Public Theater show is a product of one of the longest collaborations in the history of the American theater.
Joan Marcus Courtesy The Public Theater

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 11:31 am

Wallace Shawn is famous for his career as an actor, but over the past four decades he has written a handful of plays that are intellectually demanding and rarely produced. His characters tell stories in monologues, rather than acting them out onstage, and they use cascades of words to make dizzying arguments.

His work is being showcased at New York's Public Theater this season. A revival of The Designated Mourner opened July 21 and the American premier of another Shawn play, Grasses of a Thousand Colors, will open this fall.

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Newport Folk Festival
8:33 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Kingsley Flood, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 2:34 pm

The Boston band Kingsley Flood has spent the last few years polishing, refining and expanding its folk-rock sound, in the process incorporating horns, more strings and ever-brighter production. The sextet sounds more confident than ever on its new album, Battles, which continues to explore some of Kingsley Flood's favorite subject matter: the balance of hopes and dreams, expectations and the everyday.

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Books
4:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

In 'The Panopticon,' They're Always Watching

During the 19th century, a panopticon was a prison or asylum with an all-seeing eye. Some of the C-shaped prisons with central watchtowers still stand in the U.S. and Europe.

Jenni Fagan's new book borrows the panopticon idea as the setting for a gritty, often poetic, novel. The story is based loosely on Fagan's own experience growing up in the Scottish foster care system for 16 years.

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A Blog Supreme
4:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Piano Mastery, Trinidadian Trumpet, Singing Apes: New Jazz

Trumpeter Etienne Charles' new album is called Creole Soul.
Laura Ferreira Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:26 am

It's been too long since we simply sat up and pointed out a few of the many new releases worth a set of ears. Luckily, the staff on weekends at All Things Considered thought the same. They invited me to sit down with host Jacki Lyden and play a few cuts for them.

Here's music from an elder statesman of piano, a trumpeter who understands creole music personally, a drummer who writes tunes with a payoff, and a singer in her early 20s with maturity and kick.

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Dance
5:28 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Preserving Balanchine's Ballet Legacy, 30 Years Later

Dancers perform George Balanchine's Serenade in a 2007 production staged by Francia Russell and Suzanne Schorer at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow.
Maxim Marmur AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 11:59 am

Francia Russell hasn't performed in 50 years, but she says as soon as she hears the music for George Balanchine's Concerto Barocco, her body starts to move: "I could do it in my sleep, you know, get up and sleepwalk and do it."

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NPR Story
3:24 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Dick Hyman On Piano Jazz

Dick Hyman.
Michael Loccisano Getty Images

For this Piano Jazz recorded in 2009, host Marian McPartland welcomes back pianist Dick Hyman, who appeared on several programs throughout the years including the first season in 1979.

"Dick has such great chops," says McPartland. "He can really race up and down the keyboard — he gave me a run for my money! It was great fun having him on the show."

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TED Radio Hour
8:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Why Is The High Wire Impossible To Resist?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 12:39 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Philippe Petit's TEDTalk

High-wire artist Philippe Petit tells the story of his 1974 tightrope walk between the Twin Towers and explains his lifelong fascination with pushing himself to the limit.

About Philippe Petit

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A Blog Supreme
7:03 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Black History Meets Black Music: 'Blues People' At 50

Amiri Baraka in the 1970s.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 7:34 am

The year 1963 saw the March on Washington, the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and Medgar Evers, the bombing of the Birmingham church that resulted in the deaths of four black girls and the passing of W.E.B. Du Bois. That same year, LeRoi Jones — a twentysomething, Newark, N.J.-born, African-American, Lower East Side-based Beat poet — published a book titled Blues People: a panoramic sociocultural history of African-American music.

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