Business and Economy

Parallels
2:04 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

NAFTA Opened Continent For Some Canadian Companies

The Bombardier Challenger 300 is one of the most popular midsize business jets in production. Canada-based Bombardier has boomed in the two decades since the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed.
Todd Williamson AP

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:27 pm

Six brand new Challenger corporate jets sit on a showroom floor waiting to be picked up here at the Bombardier Aerospace plant on the outskirts of Montreal. Manager Frank Richie watches as technicians polish the gleaming aircraft and make last-minute adjustments. Each one is personalized, from the leather trim inside to the fancy paint job on its exterior.

Through a side door, you enter an enormous assembly line for more than a dozen other Challenger jets. The factory floor spans nearly 900,000 square feet.

Read more
Business
5:07 am
Wed December 25, 2013

Some UPS Deliveries Are Running Behind

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 6:04 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We'll begin NPR's business with some empty Christmas stockings.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: All right, if you're stocking was empty this morning, don't blame the Grinch. UPS acknowledged yesterday that some gifts guaranteed for Christmas Eve delivery did not reach their destinations.

Economy
5:04 am
Wed December 25, 2013

U.S. Economy Forecast To Do Better In 2014

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 6:04 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The economist Nariman Behravesh puts out an economic forecast every year. And he's predicting the U.S. economy will do better in 2014, which will help of the unemployed and also the long-term unemployed. He spoke to my colleague Steve Inskeep.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The U.S. unemployment rate has gone down to 7 percent in the year that's just ending. Where is it heading next?

Read more
NPR Story
3:48 am
Wed December 25, 2013

AmEx Settles With Feds Over Add-On Products

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 10:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now American Express has agreed to a settlement that's worth more than $75 million. This deals with claims that the company misled customers about some of its, quote, "add-on" products.

NPR's Sam Sanders explains.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: Banks and finance companies sell safety. Security.

(SOUNDBITE OF AMERICAN EXPRESS AD)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: But are you too comfortable? These days, crime can happen in a few keystrokes. American Express can help protect you.

Read more
Arts & Life
2:20 am
Wed December 25, 2013

Detroit Needs Money. Can A 'Grand Bargain' Save The City's Art?

Gladioli, Claude Monet, ca. 1876, oil on canvas.
Detroit Institute of Arts

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 6:04 pm

Can wealthy art lovers help save Detroit's pension funds — and one of its museums?

Read more
U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
2:15 am
Wed December 25, 2013

What's In Store For Commuting's Future? (Hint: There's Hope)

Imagine if the road ahead includes driverless cars.
Jiha Hwang Illustration from The Car in 2035: Mobility Planning for the Near Future is courtesy of the Civic Projects Foundation

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 6:04 pm

If you want to look into the future of commuting, you need only go to the graduate transportation program at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif.

Read more
Planet Money
9:50 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

The Great Handbell War

Malmark handbells on the left and Schulmerich bells on the right.
malmark.com/schulmerichbells.com

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 11:21 am

Jake Malta left his job as chief engineer at Schulmerich, the world's biggest handbell company, in 1973.

But Malta couldn't stop thinking about bells. He had a vision for a perfect bell — a bell he had never quite achieved at Schulmerich.

So he set up shop in his living room. "He had a folding table, two of them, stretched out with all of his drafting supplies and piano behind him," his daughter, Joann, says.

He traveled to Europe and studied the physics of bells. He made sketch after sketch. "He knew that he could make it better," his daughter says.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:40 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Drugmaker Names Pill After CEO Who Sought Daughter's Cure

Martine Rothblatt, CEO of United Therapeutics, is the namesake of the company's latest drug, Orenitram.
Ron Levine Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 3:25 pm

Read more
The Salt
7:32 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Top German Chocolate Maker Fights For Its 'Natural' Reputation

If you're selling food in Germany, "natural" is good. It's a place that distrusts technological manipulation of what we eat.

Witness, for example, a 500-year-old law that allows beer-makers to use only three ingredients: water, barley and hops. The law has since been loosened slightly, but many brewers continue to abide by it for marketing reasons.

Read more
Economy
6:30 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Thousands Fall From Middle Class After RV Industry Collapse

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 6:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We're going to take a close look, now, at the human cost when an industry shuts down. Oregon has kept detailed records on what happened to thousands of people who lost their jobs when the state's RV manufacturing industry imploded during the recession. Since then, many workers dropped from middle wage to low wage earners, a trend playing out across the United States. Some fared even worse. NPR's Kelly McEvers when to Oregon to meet the people behind the numbers.

BRADLEY WARING: Entering Junction City, 5,460 people.

Read more

Pages