Business and Economy

NPR Story
4:00 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Bliss Ends When Microsoft Pulls The Plug On XP Support

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Bliss.

That's the name of an iconic photograph that you might associate with this sound.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC FOR WINDOWS XP OPERATING SYSTEM)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Bliss is the default computer desktop image you see on your computer when you launch Microsoft's Windows XP operating system. The photo features rolling green hills, a blue sky with white clouds. The colors are so vivid you might think it's fake.

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Business
2:42 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Just How New Is The 'New' GM?

CEO Mary Barra told Congress that she sits at the helm of the new GM. Is the company new and improved? The answer is complicated.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 8:34 am

During her grilling before Congress last week, General Motors CEO Mary Barra insisted the new General Motors is different and better than the old one.

So as GM begins to fix nearly 2.6 million vehicles for an ignition-switch defect that has been linked to at least 13 deaths, we decided to put that claim to the test.

Exactly how new is the new GM?

NBC's Saturday Night Live answered with a parody version of Barra's explanation:

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The Salt
5:25 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Can Fish Farms Thrive In The USA?

Live tilapia are loaded into a truck bound for New York.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on

Why hasn't fish farming taken off in the United States?

It's certainly not for lack of demand for the fish. Slowly but surely, seafood that's grown in aquaculture is taking over the seafood section at your supermarket, and the vast majority is imported. The shrimp and tilapia typically come from warm-water ponds in southeast Asia and Latin America. Farmed salmon come from big net pens in the coastal waters of Norway or Chile.

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The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

WATCH: Giant Container Ship Collides With Hong Kong Park

The 633-foot container ship Hanza Constitution runs aground in Hong Kong.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 7:47 am

Such are the hazards of living in a city that is also home to one of the world's busiest ports ...

Joggers are used to dodging bikers, skateboarders and even stray animals. But if you'd happened to be running on a popular path at the Stanley Ho Sports Center in Hong Kong's Pok Fu Lam district on Sunday, you might have come close to hitting a 633-foot container ship.

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All Tech Considered
3:40 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Silicon Valley Buying Spree: A Tech Bubble, Or Strategy At Play?

Are we in a tech bubble about to burst? Facebook bought WhatsApp for $19 billion earlier this year. WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum speaks during a conference at the Mobile World Congress 2014 in Spain.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 8:22 am

Over the past few months, the country's biggest technology firms have spent billions buying startups. Are we watching another tech bubble about to burst?

In this year's first quarter, Google and Facebook, alone, announced deals worth more than $24 billion on little companies that have almost no revenue. Those deals seem to have spooked Wall Street; last week, technology stocks plunged and the tech-heavy Nasdaq index fell nearly 1.2 percent Monday.

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Economy
3:23 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

How A Regulation Helped Ease Way For Stock Market's 'Flash Boys'

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 6:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. In recent years, high speed computers have drastically altered the way the stock market operates. What's called high frequency trading has been getting renewed attention thanks to "Flash Boys," the latest book from Michael Lewis. In that book, he argues the changes have created a lot of new problems.

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The Two-Way
10:45 am
Mon April 7, 2014

New Airline Survey Gives Virgin America Top Rating

A man looks at a flight departure board filled with weather-related cancellations and delays at Boston's Logan Airport in January.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 3:44 pm

U.S. airlines got their highest ratings in more than 20 years in 2013, according to an annual survey, but customers were still not satisfied with the frequency of flight delays and lost or damaged bags.

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Business
4:14 am
Mon April 7, 2014

5-Year-Old Boy Exposes Bug In Microsoft's Xbox

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Our last word in business today - pint-sized security breach.

KGTV in San Diego says Kristoffer Von Hassel recently exposed a major bug in Microsoft's Xbox. He is 5 years old.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Five years old, but Kristoffer was able to log into his father's Xbox Live account after entering the wrong password, then hitting the space bar.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPACE BAR BEING HIT)

INSKEEP: ...a bunch of times.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPACE BAR BEING HIT)

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Business
4:14 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Tech News Site Re/code Creates Buzz In Silicon Valley

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:17 am

Re/code is a new tech site that doesn't charge its readers or expect to make much from ads. Instead, it has a successful conference business. Other media also see potential profits in conferences.

Business
4:14 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Tyson Foods Recalls Frozen Chicken Nuggets

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a warning about chicken nuggets.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Tyson Foods has recalled more than 75,000 pounds of frozen chicken nuggets. Consumers complained that they found small pieces of plastic in their food that caused some minor oral injuries.

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