Business and Economy

War On Poverty, 50 Years Later
4:11 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

One Family's Story Shows How The Cycle Of Poverty Is Hard To Break

Desiree Metcalf, here with one of her three daughters, is one of many poor Americans who find themselves trapped in a system meant to help.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:59 am

Desiree Metcalf's story is heartbreaking, but among the 46 million Americans who are poor today, her story is not unique.

Metcalf is 24 years old.

She's the mother of three little girls — ages 6, 4 and 2. They all have different fathers.

"That about sums me up, I think," she says.

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The Salt
3:45 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

For Many, Farming Is A Labor Of Love, Not A Living

Miller with one of his cows.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:59 am

Every five years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture carries out a census of farmers: who they are, and what they are doing on their farms.

The agency just released the latest one, and it's a feast for all ag geeks. And here's the very first, most basic piece of new information: There are 2,109,303 farmers in this country.

But look a little closer at that number, and you can see that it's not quite what it seems. Most of those farmers are not actually making a living by farming.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Brunei's Shariah Law Spurs Boycott Of Beverly Hills Hotel

People protest outside the Beverly Hills Hotel, which is owned by the Sultan of Brunei, over the country's Shariah law penal code in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Monday.
Jonathan Alcorn Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 3:20 pm

The Beverly Hills City Council voted Tuesday night to ask the government of Brunei to divest itself of the famed Beverly Hills Hotel.

At issue: Shariah, or Islamic, law. Last week, Brunei, a tiny oil-rich kingdom in southeast Asia, adopted Shariah as part of its penal code. The law, which will be introduced in phases, makes abortion, adultery and gay relationships punishable by flogging and stoning.

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The Two-Way
9:07 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Reported $147 Million Home Price Would Set New U.S. Record

A satellite image depicts a beachfront estate that reportedly sold for $147 million in East Hampton, N.Y.
Google Maps

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 3:12 pm

The stock market has been on a winning streak — and that means these are busy times in exclusive U.S. housing markets. How else to explain three homes that each reportedly sold for more than $100 million in the past three months?

News that hedge fund founder Barry Rosenstein is buying an East Hampton, N.Y., property for $147 million prompted Bloomberg News to declare, "The U.S. trophy-home market is shattering price records this year."

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Business
5:52 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Yogurt May Become New York's Official Snack

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 7:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business is: A Yogurt State of Mind.

The New York State Senate voted on yesterday on the official state snack.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

They were voting to give that honor to yogurt. Apparently, New York is the leading yogurt producer in America. But in a state famous for bagels and giant pretzels, not to mention big apples, the debate got heated.

MONTAGNE: The social media site BuzzFeed tweeted the highlights, such as a state senator asking, was yogurt the only option?

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Business
5:14 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Nigeria's Economy Leads Other African Nations

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 9:27 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Matthew Bishop, New York bureau chief at The Economist, about Nigeria's economy. The biggest country in Africa has also just become the continent's largest economy.

Business
4:06 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Edgy Video Promotes Christie's Contemporary Art Sale

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 4:24 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a new way of marketing high-end art.

Spring auction season has kicked off in New York City. Yesterday, paintings by Picasso and Monet helped the auction house, Christie's, cello most $300 million worth of paintings.

As NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, this year, Christie's is promoting its auctions in a new way, with something that looks a lot like a music video.

ELIZABETH BLAIR, BYLINE: It's pretty slick.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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NPR Story
4:06 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Chinese E-Commerce Giant To Offer U.S. IPO

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 4:07 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A Chinese e-commerce giant filed for an initial public stock offering yesterday. Alibaba - which has no exact equivalent in the U.S. - will, however, conduct its IPO here. And it's expected to raise billions. The IPO could be the biggest since Facebook back in 2012. To learn more about Alibaba, we turn to NPR's Frank Langfitt, who's in Shanghai. Good morning.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: So exactly what is Alibaba?

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War On Poverty, 50 Years Later
2:34 am
Wed May 7, 2014

The Changing Picture Of Poverty: Hard Work Is 'Just Not Enough'

Victoria Houser of Painted Post, N.Y., is raising her son, Brayden, on her own. She says she feels stuck in a never-ending cycle, constantly worried that one financial emergency will send everything tumbling down.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 4:27 pm

There are 46 million poor people in the U.S., and millions more hover right above the poverty line — but go into many of their homes, and you might find a flat-screen TV, a computer or the latest sneakers.

And that raises a question: What does it mean to be poor in America today?

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Sports
5:21 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

Brewskee-Ball Founders Refuse To Be Sidelined By Trademark Case

Brewskee-Ball has built a league of competitive Skee-Ball players, but the owners of the name Skee-Ball are not amused.
Courtesy of Eric Pavony

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:04 pm

The founders of Brewskee-Ball like to say they've taken Skee-Ball from the arcade to the bar, turning the old-time amusement park game into a competitive sport with hundreds of dedicated players in a handful of locations across the country, including Brooklyn, N.Y., San Francisco and Austin.

But the company that makes Skee-Ball machines is not amused.

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