Business and Economy

Technology
10:50 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Does New Hiring Tool Aid Diversity Or Discrimination?

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 1:33 pm

A new tool lets job recruiters filter candidates based on race, gender and veteran status. Civil rights attorney Cyrus Mehri sorts through the legal questions about this program.

The Two-Way
9:25 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Rosie The Riveter's World War II-Era Plant Saved

A campaign to save the Willow Run Bomber Plant in Ypsilanti Township, Mich., appears to have succeeded. The factory is where Rosie the Riveter and thousands of other women built B-24 bombers during World War II.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

In the end, it was a riveting finish: A campaign to save part of the Michigan factory where Rosie the Riveter and thousands of other women built B-24 bombers during World War II has raised the money needed to turn it into a museum.

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Business
5:58 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Merger Possible In Home Entertainment Industry

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with another possible home entertainment merger.

AT&T wants to purchase the Satellite TV provider DirecTV. The Wall Street Journal first reported the news. The deal would likely be worth around $40 billion. This comes in the wake of Comcast's attempt to buy Time Warner Cable. It's still seeking government approval for the deal.

NPR Story
5:09 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Doge At 'Dega: Dogecoin Sponsors Race Car

Phil Parsons Racing

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 10:54 am

Dogecoin users, it turns out, are passionate about underdogs. At Talladega Superspeedway this Sunday, one of the cars running will stand out from the rest.

Dogecoin is the digital currency that's similar to Bitcoin. (Doge is a slang term for "dog" used in Internet memes. There's a famous image of a puzzled-looking dog that's been a viral hit and it's also the currency's mascot.)

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Around the Nation
4:13 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Seattle Proposal Would Raise City's Minimum Wage To $15 An Hour

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 2:24 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The minimum wage may go up anyway in Seattle. Politicians there want to raise the local minimum higher than current 7.25, and higher than President Obama's goal of 10.10. [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: Seattle's current minimum wage, like all of Washington state's, is $9.19 per hour.] Seattle is seriously considering setting the minimum wage at $15.

Here's NPR's Martin Kaste.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Seattle - 15, 15, 15!

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Politics
4:12 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Senate Republicans Block Bill To Raise Federal Minimum Wage

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:35 am

One of the Democrats top election themes this year was stopped cold in the Senate on Wednesday. Republicans successfully blocked Democrats from even taking up a bill to raise the minimum wage.

Economy
4:11 am
Thu May 1, 2014

China Could Pass U.S. As Top Economy This Year

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 12:46 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The United States economy has been the largest in the world since the days when Ulysses S. Grant was president. That was in the 1870s. But a new World Bank report says by one measure that could change by the end of this year: China would take over the top spot this year.

To explain what the new report means and what it doesn't, we turn to NPR's Frank Langfitt. He's on the line from Shanghai. Hi, Frank.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

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Business
4:11 am
Thu May 1, 2014

50 Years Of BASIC

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 4:00 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's Joe Palca is in our studios and he's brought along a piece of paper. Joe, what's it say?

JOE PALCA, BYLINE: It says, let X equal seven plus eight divided by three.

INSKEEP: It sounds like kind of a mathematical equation there.

PALCA: It's actually a line of computer code and it was part of the first very short program ever run in a language called BASIC.

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All Tech Considered
4:25 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

High-Tech Maker Spaces: Helping Little Startups Make It Big

A member works in the electronics lab at NextFab Studios in Philadelphia. Members pay for access to computers and high-end machines like laser cutters and 3-D printers.
Jon Kalish

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:20 pm

Around the country, there are lots of tinkerers working on what they hope will be the next brilliant idea — but who don't have the tools in their garage to build it.

In dozens of cities, those innovators can set up shop in a "maker space" — community workshops where members have access to sophisticated tools and expertise.

Maker spaces have become hotbeds of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. Now, governments, universities and big corporations are taking notice — and beginning to invest in them.

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The Salt
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Renegade Cider Makers Get Funky To Cope With Apple Shortage

Nat West, owner of Reverend Nat's Hard Cider in Portland, Ore., uses sweet apples to make cider, and gives it an extra kick with ginger juice, herbal tonics, coffee and hops.
Courtesy of Reverend Nat's Hard Cider

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:31 am

For centuries, hard apple cider has been made with the fermented juice of apples — nothing more, nothing less. And a lot of cider drinkers and makers — let's call them purists — like it that way.

But a new wave of renegade cider makers in America is shirking tradition and adding unusual ingredients to the fermentation tank — from chocolate and tropical fruit juices to herbs, chili peppers and unusual yeasts. Their aim — which is controversial among the purists — is to bring out the best, or just the weirdest, flavors in the ciders.

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