Education

Health
4:17 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

Amid Rising Concern About Addiction, Universities Focus On Recovery

Students in recovery from substance abuse are finding support on a growing number of college and university campuses, including the University of Texas at Austin.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 5:22 pm

In murder mystery novels, when the hero, a private detective or homicide cop, drops by a late-night Alcoholics Anonymous meeting to stave off a sudden craving for a beer or two or 20, it's usually in some dingy church basement or dilapidated storefront on the seedier side of town. There's a pot of burnt coffee and a few stale doughnuts on a back table.

The Center for Students in Recovery at the University of Texas could not be more different.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Six Things We Learned At South By Southwest EDU

SXSW Edu Logo

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 5:58 am

The NPR Ed team is back from Austin, where we connected with hundreds of educators and people excited about education at the annual South By Southwest Edu Conference. As with many conferences, there's just as much to be gained from conversations in the hallways and chance encounters as from the official sessions. Here's what we learned from both.

1) For many teachers, the most important tech tools are free.

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NPR Ed
6:53 am
Sun March 15, 2015

From Afghanistan's Rubble, A Teacher Builds A School Of Ideas

Aziz Royesh is one of 10 finalists for the $1 million Global Teacher Prize.
Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 2:44 pm

Aziz Royesh is a man whose life has been defined by one over-arching ambition: He says he simply wants to be a teacher.

At 46, he has achieved that goal in one of the most difficult and dangerous environments in the world — Afghanistan. He has also founded a school that is now winning international acclaim as a model for education in that war-battered nation.

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The Two-Way
9:20 am
Sat March 14, 2015

Fraternity's Defense Lawyer Not Ruling Out Suing OU

Lawyer Stephen Jones has been retained by a board representing the recently-disbanded Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapter at the University of Oklahoma. He said Friday he's not ruling out a lawsuit.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 2:04 pm

Lawyer Stephen Jones, hired yesterday by members of Oklahoma University's disbanded chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, said today he's hopeful he can avoid a lawsuit against the school but he's not ruling one out.

Jones, who is most widely known for defending Timothy McVeigh in the Oklahoma City bombing trial, was retained by a board of alumni who oversee the OU chapter of SAE.

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The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Athletes Help Cheerleader With Down Syndrome Defy Bullies

Alyssa Smith readjusts Desiree Andrews' hair as they cheer for the seventh grade basketball team at Lincoln Middle School on Monday in Kenosha, Wis. The gym has been dubbed "D's House" in Desiree's honor.
Kevin Poirier/Kenosha News AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 4:39 pm

In Wisconsin, what began as a heartwarming show of courtesy and affection is now making Desiree Andrews, 14, into an international celebrity.

Desiree is a cheerleader at Lincoln Middle School in Kenosha, Wis. She has Down syndrome — and as some hecklers learned last year, she has the full support of her school's basketball team and her community.

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NPR Ed
6:48 am
Fri March 13, 2015

The (Million-Dollar) Value Of Great Teaching

The 10 finalists for this year's Global Teacher Prize (clockwise from top left): Jacque Kahura, Stephen Ritz, Phalla Neang, Azizullah Royesh, Richard Spencer, Guy Etienne, Madenjit Singh, Naomi Volain, Kiran Bir Sethi and Nancie Atwell.
Courtesy of Global Teacher Prize

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 12:27 pm

What's the best way to engage and prepare students? For 10 teachers across the world that's the million-dollar question — literally.

This Sunday, the Varkey Foundation will award $1 million to one remarkable teacher as part of its first Global Teacher Prize. Founded in 2010, the Varkey Foundation is a Dubai-based organization that trains and funds teachers internationally.

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U.S.
4:29 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

In Idaho School District, Preschool At Risk Without Federal Funds

Idaho preschool teacher Mary Allen listens to one of her students during their afternoon snack time. The state doesn't have public preschool, so programs are paid for through a hodgepodge of funding sources.
Emilie Ritter Saunders KBSX

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:43 pm

The Basin School District in rural south-central Idaho has something most districts in the state don't: preschool. But now that's at risk because of federal funding cuts.

It's not alone: Sparsely populated school districts and counties covered in federal forest lands will have less money this year — $250 million less — because Congress allowed the Secure Rural Schools Act to expire.

Since Idaho doesn't have public preschool, schools that want to offer it have to find creative ways to pay for the program — state money isn't an option.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Ditching The Common Core Brings A Big Test For Indiana

Indiana squeezed the normal life cycle of a test—pilot, field, real—into one, massive exam that clocked in at 12 hours.
LA Johnson/NPR

Every eldest child knows all too well: Going first can be tough.

There's no one to help you pick the good teachers at school or give you advice on how to tell Mom and Dad about that fender bender.

Right now, Indiana is the firstborn, feeling its way through some thorny — and consequential — education decisions with little precedent to lean on.

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NPR Ed
3:56 am
Thu March 12, 2015

A Child Of Slavery Who Taught A Generation

Anna Julia Cooper was the fourth African-American woman in the U.S. to earn a doctoral degree.
Scurlock Studios Smithsonian

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 12:15 pm

Some great teachers change the life of a student, maybe several. Anna Julia Cooper changed America.

Cooper was one of the first black women in the country to earn a Ph.D. Before that, she headed the first public high school for black students in the District of Columbia — Washington Colored High School. It later became known as the M Street School and was eventually renamed for poet Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Dunbar was a citadel of learning in segregated Washington, a center for rigorous study and no-holds-barred achievement. Its graduates over the years include:

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Education
11:18 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Students Air Issues Of Race, Diversity At University Of Oklahoma Forum

Jesse Robbins speaks in front of students at a town hall forum on race and diversity at the University of Oklahoma.
Jacob McCleland KGOU

Too few peers in the classroom. A lack of minority professors. Insensitive jokes. These were a few of the issues raised at a race and diversity town hall forum on Wednesday night at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. The forum was hosted by Unheard and the Price College of Business.

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