Education

NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

New Orleans District Moves To An All-Charter System

The drill team of Sophie B. Wright, a charter school in the New Orleans Recovery School District. The city's all-charter system is the first in the U.S.
Skooksie Flickr

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 3:57 pm

The nation's largest experiment with charter schools is expanding.

The Recovery School District, a state control board that runs most schools in New Orleans, shut down the last of its five traditional public schools this week, making it the first all-charter system in the nation.

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Code Switch
11:45 am
Fri May 30, 2014

In Historic First, Native American Brothers Win Lacrosse Trophy

Miles Thompson of the SUNY-Albany Great Danes broke the record for goals in a season this year ‚ÄĒ a season which also saw his younger brother and teammate, Lyle, break the record for overall points.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 2:26 pm

The Tewaaraton Award is college lacrosse's equivalent of the Heisman Trophy, given to the best player in the country each year. The award takes its name from the Mohawk word for lacrosse, as a way to honor the sport's Native American origins. The bronze trophy depicts a Mohawk man with a lacrosse stick, surging forward.

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Fri May 30, 2014

National Spelling Bee: Rare Co-Champions, And A Star Online

Ansun Sujoe, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Sriram Hathwar, of Painted Post, N.Y., were named co-champions of the 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday. Their siblings helped them celebrate the first shared title since 1962.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 11:41 am

For the first time in 52 years, the Scripps National Spelling Bee crowned two winners last night, after the final two competitors exhausted the word list. The winners were Sriram Hathwar, an eighth-grader from Painted Post, N.Y., and Ansun Sujoe, a seventh-grader from Fort Worth, Texas.

"I like sharing the victory with someone else," Ansun said. "It's been quite shocking and quite interesting, too. It's very rare."

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will add eight officers
7:30 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Oklahoma City Schools To Increase Security

Credit USAG-Humphreys / Flickr.com

Elementary schools in Oklahoma City will have additional security when classes resume in August.

The school district and the Oklahoma City Police Department have announced plans to add eight officers to support elementary schools.

The officers will rotate through the district's 55 elementary schools and offer support when campuses need increased security. Four officers will be in place for the start of school on Aug. 4. The remaining officers will be added in January 2015.

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NPR Ed
12:24 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

ACLU Sues California For 'Equal Learning Time'

California high school students Briana Lamb and Cristian Gaspar are named in the ACLU's equal learning time lawsuit.
ACLU SoCal/Public Counsel

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 3:00 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union today filed a class-action lawsuit claiming that high poverty schools in California are denying students the learning time they need to succeed. The problem is so great and so pervasive, the lawsuit claims, that it violates the state constitution.

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NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

The Future Of Online Ed Isn't Heading Where You Expect

Queens Royal College, a historic secondary school in Port of Spain, Trinidad.
David Stanley Flickr

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 2:05 pm

A new pioneer has just planted its flag on the ed-tech frontier: the country of Trinidad and Tobago. Its government this week announced the creation of a "national knowledge network" to promote free online learning in partnership with Khan Academy and Coursera. The initiative is part of a broader national strategy of investment in education.

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NPR Ed
6:49 am
Wed May 28, 2014

When College Isn't Worth It

Save up your pennies ... but shop wisely.
Doram iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 9:45 am

The New York Times highlighted new data yesterday that once again beats the drum: Despite skyrocketing costs, a college degree is a good investment. In fact, MIT economist David Autor writes in the journal Science that the value of a degree is rising. College grads made almost twice as much per hour in 2013 as workers without a four-year degree. And the lifetime value of a diploma is now around a half-million dollars, even after you factor in tuition.

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NPR Ed
11:37 am
Tue May 27, 2014

The Common Core FAQ

Louis C.K. isn't the only parent confused about the Common Core.
Mike Coppola Getty

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 8:42 am

The Common Core State Standards have vaulted into the national consciousness lately thanks to some high-profile dissenters, like Louis C.K. ("Kids teachers parents are vocally suffering.") and Stephen Colbert ("Common Core testing is preparing students for what they'll face as adults ‚ÄĒ pointless stress and confusion.")

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NPR Ed
6:27 am
Tue May 27, 2014

The 3 Questions To Ask In Any Classroom

Does colorful classroom art necessarily mean great teaching?
Steve Ioya Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 6:07 am

It's a frequent complaint in education journalism: Reporters should spend less time at school board meetings and get into a classroom to find out what's really going on.

For reporters, though, that's a challenge and a risk, because lots of good journalists don't know what to look for in a busy classroom. How do you know if what you're seeing is "good" or not? After all, reporters aren't professional educators. And they're often under deadline.

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Youth Radio
5:22 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Meadow Homes 4th Graders Embrace Common Core Standards

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 6:57 am

The Common Core State Standards have roiled state legislatures across the country and frustrated some parents. But what do kids think of them? We visit a school in California's Bay Area to find out.

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