Education

Code Switch
8:03 am
Tue March 10, 2015

Photos: From Grace Jones To Toni Morrison, Little Girl Dresses Up Like Black Heroines

Lily Bushelle, 5, as Toni Morrison.
Courtesy of Marc Bushelle

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 2:49 pm

While surfing the Web one day, Janine Harper came across a project where a photographer had taken pictures of her daughter dressed up as famous women, including Coco Chanel and Amelia Earhart. Harper showed the project to her husband, photographer Marc Bushelle, and together they thought it would be wonderful to adapt it for their 5-year-old daughter, Lily. Their goal was to create a fun learning method for Lily so that she could start to "see herself in the story" of black history.

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Education
6:13 am
Tue March 10, 2015

Major Residential Construction Project On University Of Oklahoma Regents' Agenda

An artistic rendering of the proposed Residential Colleges project on the University of Oklahoma campus.
KWG Architects/adg University of Oklahoma Board of Regents

The University of Oklahoma Board of Regents will consider approving the design and development phase for a major construction project of two residential colleges.

Each facility would house about 300 students and a faculty member in residence, and be connected by a communal dining area. It would also have a storm shelter.

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NPR Story
4:08 am
Tue March 10, 2015

Oklahoma University Cuts Ties With Fraternity After Racist Video Posted

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 KGOU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kgou.org.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
11:03 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

The Numbers Add Up To This: Less And Less Opportunity For Poor Kids

An employee at the American Disposables Inc. factory works on the assembly line in October 2009 in Ware, Mass. The state has seen rapidly expanding income disparity in the past 50 years as highly educated tech and financial workers have seen big gains and inflation-adjusted income has shrunk for the poorest residents.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 12:57 pm

In this country, all children are supposed to have a shot at success — a chance to jump "from rags to riches" in one generation.

Even if riches remain out of reach, then the belief has been that every hard-working American should be able to go from poverty to the middle class.

On Tuesday, a book and a separate study are being released — both turning up evidence that the one-generation leap is getting harder to accomplish in an economy so tied to education, technological know-how and networking.

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NPR Ed
1:07 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

The Teacher Who Believes Math Equals Love

For her trigonometry class, Sarah Hagan (center) uses everything but the kitchen sink: a flower pot, garbage basket, rolls of tape, rubber balls, even loose spaghetti.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 6:19 pm

What makes a great teacher great? That's the question at the heart of 50 Great Teachers, from the NPR Ed Team.

Sarah Hagan has a passion for math, and the pi-shaped pendant to prove it.

The 25-year-old teaches at Drumright High School in Drumright, Okla. The faded oil town is easy to miss. Fewer than 3,000 people live there, and the highway humps right around it.

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NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Math Love, Game-Based Learning, And More From NPR Ed At #SXSWEdu

Sarah Hagan, a young algebra teacher in Oklahoma oil country, will be joining us at SXSW Edu to talk about her unorthodox approach to classroom math.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

It's not quite as glamorous as the way our colleagues at NPR Music do it, but this week, the NPR Ed team will be heading down to Austin, Texas for the South By Southwest Edu conference.

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The Howard Project
8:41 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Education May Be Priceless, But A College Degree Isn't

"The Howard Project" participants Kevin Peterman (top left), Leighton Watson, Ariel Alford (bottom left) and Taylor Davis, shown in the Howard University library, are offering insights into their thoughts and fears as they approach the end of the senior year.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

Paying for college gets more expensive every year.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Americans owe more than a trillion dollars in outstanding student loan payments.

The result can be a lot of pressure for college grads. The four seniors participating in our Howard Project — Ariel Alford, Taylor Davis, Leighton Watson and Kevin Peterman — talk to us about finances.

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Interviews
7:56 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Learning The Hard Truth About Lying

Marilee Jones, former MIT dean of admissions and now a college admissions consultant.
Courtesy Marilee Jones

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

We all lie sometimes. But if you're in the public eye, the lie can take on a life of its own.

NBC's Brian Williams became the victim of his own story last month, exaggerating the danger he faced while reporting in Iraq in 2003. It lead to an on-air mea culpa and a temporary suspension from the anchor desk.

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Education
2:00 pm
Sat March 7, 2015

Senator Ties Education Savings Accounts To AP History Ban

State Sen. John Sparks (D-Norman)
Credit Oklahoma Senate

A Democratic state senator who opposes a bill creating education savings accounts is proposing three amendments that appear to take a shot at other recent Republican legislation.

The amendments involve drug testing parents and bans on Advanced Placement U.S. history courses and Common Core standards materials.

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Education
11:26 am
Sat March 7, 2015

Superintendent: State Could Pioneer New School Measure

Joy Hofmeister, superintendent of public instruction, listens to a question from the audience during the \"Oklahoma Watch-Out\" forum on March 3, 2015.
Ilea Shutler Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma Schools Superintendent Joy Hofmeister said she knows of no school grading system in the nation that she likes and believes Oklahoma can develop its own pioneering system to measure school performance.

However, she said revising the controversial A through F grading system is not an immediate priority. She is focused now on a “crisis” with keeping and hiring teachers and trying to add more days to the school year.

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