Education

Education
4:40 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Do Autistic Kids Fare Better In Integrated Or Specialized Schools?

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 3:03 pm

The federal law that governs special education lays out the goals pretty clearly: Students are entitled to an appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment.

But some parents of children with autism feel their local public schools aren't meeting their kids' needs. And with autism diagnoses rising, new schools are emerging specifically for autistic children.

Some parents see these specialized schools as a godsend. For others, they raise a new set of questions.

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Education
3:36 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Despite Expansion, Many Pre-K Programs Fail To Reach Immigrant Kids

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:50 pm

Most states have embarked on a significant expansion of preschool programs, but a new report says they appear to be missing the kids who need these programs most: low-income, immigrant children.

NPR Ed
2:03 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Reaching Immigrant Children By Helping Their Parents

There are 96 languages spoken across the Los Angeles Unified School District; 49 percent of California's young children have an immigrant parent.
Julie Flickr

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 4:00 pm

At our neighborhood playground in Brooklyn, you can hear kids shouting and playing in Russian, Spanish, Yiddish, Tagalog, French, Hebrew, Vietnamese, Cantonese and Polish. This kind of giddy cacophony has been par for the course in New York City for 150 years, but it's becoming more and more common across the country.

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Education
6:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

New Orleans Closes Its Last Traditional Schools

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 1:43 pm

Last week, the New Orleans school district became the first all-charter district in the country. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Sarah Carr, a reporter who's been following the city's changing schools.

NPR Ed
5:46 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Is The Deck Stacked Against Black Boys In America?

President Obama, with Attorney General Eric Holder and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, speaks about a report from My Brother's Keeper, an initiative to expand opportunities for young men and boys of color.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:27 pm

The numbers are grim. Black boys are more likely than white boys to live in poverty, and with a single parent. They're also more likely to be suspended from school and land in prison, and less likely to be able to read.

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News
3:36 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Spelling Co-Champs Beat The Bee, Leaving Judges Without Words

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Melissa, can I have a word for a moment?

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Absolutely. How about, thymelici?

SIEGEL: Oh, the dancing chorus in ancient Greek plays?

BLOCK: Yeah.

SIEGEL: No, I was thinking more of, encaenia.

BLOCK: Encaenia. The academic ceremony for conferring honorary degrees?

SIEGEL: Well, of course. Those two everyday words figured in the Scripps National Spelling Bee that ended in a rare tie yesterday.

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NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

New Orleans District Moves To An All-Charter System

The drill team of Sophie B. Wright, a charter school in the New Orleans Recovery School District. The city's all-charter system is the first in the U.S.
Skooksie Flickr

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 3:57 pm

The nation's largest experiment with charter schools is expanding.

The Recovery School District, a state control board that runs most schools in New Orleans, shut down the last of its five traditional public schools this week, making it the first all-charter system in the nation.

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Code Switch
11:45 am
Fri May 30, 2014

In Historic First, Native American Brothers Win Lacrosse Trophy

Miles Thompson of the SUNY-Albany Great Danes broke the record for goals in a season this year ‚ÄĒ a season which also saw his younger brother and teammate, Lyle, break the record for overall points.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 2:26 pm

The Tewaaraton Award is college lacrosse's equivalent of the Heisman Trophy, given to the best player in the country each year. The award takes its name from the Mohawk word for lacrosse, as a way to honor the sport's Native American origins. The bronze trophy depicts a Mohawk man with a lacrosse stick, surging forward.

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Fri May 30, 2014

National Spelling Bee: Rare Co-Champions, And A Star Online

Ansun Sujoe, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Sriram Hathwar, of Painted Post, N.Y., were named co-champions of the 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday. Their siblings helped them celebrate the first shared title since 1962.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 11:41 am

For the first time in 52 years, the Scripps National Spelling Bee crowned two winners last night, after the final two competitors exhausted the word list. The winners were Sriram Hathwar, an eighth-grader from Painted Post, N.Y., and Ansun Sujoe, a seventh-grader from Fort Worth, Texas.

"I like sharing the victory with someone else," Ansun said. "It's been quite shocking and quite interesting, too. It's very rare."

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will add eight officers
7:30 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Oklahoma City Schools To Increase Security

Credit USAG-Humphreys / Flickr.com

Elementary schools in Oklahoma City will have additional security when classes resume in August.

The school district and the Oklahoma City Police Department have announced plans to add eight officers to support elementary schools.

The officers will rotate through the district's 55 elementary schools and offer support when campuses need increased security. Four officers will be in place for the start of school on Aug. 4. The remaining officers will be added in January 2015.

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