Education

Digital Life
6:27 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

In Kansas, Professors Must Now Watch What They Tweet

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:17 pm

The Kansas Board of Regents gave final approval Wednesday to a strict new policy on what employees may say on social media. Critics say the policy violates both the First Amendment and academic freedom, but school officials say providing faculty with more specific guidelines will actually bolster academic freedom on campus.

The controversial policy was triggered by an equally controversial tweet posted last September by David Guth, an associate journalism professor. Reacting to a lone gunman who killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., he wrote:

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Education
3:00 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

As More Speakers Get The Boot, Who's Left To Send Off Graduates?

Several high-profile commencement speakers have resigned in the wake of student protests this graduation season.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 6:59 pm

Graduation Season? More like Disinvitation Season.

As students across the country prepare for pomp and circumstance, college and university administrators are grappling with a series of commencement speech boondoggles.

This year alone, nearly a dozen big-name commencement speakers — including the head of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice — have been invited to speak at graduation ceremonies, only to withdraw or have their invitations rescinded in the wake of campus protests.

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NPR Story
4:03 am
Wed May 14, 2014

More School Districts Rethink Zero-Tolerance Policies

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 6:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Earlier this year, the Obama administration asked schools across the country to rethink how they discipline students. Now, instead of automatic suspensions and other tough punishments, more schools are considering alternatives.

Laura Isensee, of Houston Public Media, takes a look at one of those alternatives.

LAURA ISENSEE, BYLINE: Two teenage girls come into the assistant principal's office at the Academy of Choice in northwest Houston. They used to be friends. But now they're fighting. It's time for a serious sit-down.

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Education
1:02 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

A Recap Of Monday's Vote On Oklahoma Reading Retention Bill

State Rep. Katie Henke (R-Tulsa) speaking during a press conference after Monday's House vote.
Nate Robson Oklahoma Watch

Three days after it was announced that nearly 8,000 Oklahoma students are at risk of repeating the third grade for failing the state’s reading test, lawmakers voted to change the state’s retention requirements.

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Education
10:19 am
Tue May 13, 2014

What Drives Protests On Campus?

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 12:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's commencement season. You might be headed to one this weekend. And while you're probably most concerned with seeing your loved one get that piece of paper, these days many students and faculty are showing new interest in who offers those often banal but still widely noted commencement remarks.

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Early Childhood Education
7:47 am
Tue May 13, 2014

New National Report Highlights Oklahoma's Preschool Access, Standards

weldonlibrary Flickr Creative Commons

A new report says the availability of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs varies widely from one part of the country to another.

In Oklahoma, Florida, and Vermont, more than seven in 10 four-year-olds are enrolled in such programs, while 10 states have none.

The report released Tuesday is from the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University in collaboration with the Education Department's National Center for Education Statistics.

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Education
7:47 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Legislature Sends 3rd Grade Reading Bill To Fallin For Signature

Reading Test Results
Credit Oklahoma State Department of Education / Oklahoma Watch

A bill that would provide school districts more flexibility to promote third graders who may not be reading at grade level is on its way to the governor's desk.

The House voted 83-6 Monday for the changes to the Reading Sufficiency Act, which was part of a Republican-led agenda to increase the rigor in Oklahoma schools and prevent students from advancing to the fourth grade if they didn't score satisfactory on a state reading test.

The bill adds several ways for students to advance to the fourth grade, even if they didn't meet all of the requirements currently in statute.

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

A Prom Like Any Other — But With A Few Exceptions

Two of the students who participated in the Multnomah Education Service District's Special Needs Prom this past weekend.
Lucy Ohlsen OPB

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 4:56 pm

An "Aloha Prom" was held in Oregon this past weekend, complete with leis and a huge punch bowl. Tailored for students with special needs, the dance was organized by the state's reigning teacher of the year.

Just a few years ago, the students didn't have a prom to go to.

Brett Bigham, who is the first special ed teacher to be named Oregon's teacher of the year, started the Special Needs Prom five years ago, Oregon Public Broadcasting reports.

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Education
11:24 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Asian-Americans Are Successful, But No Thanks To Tiger Parenting

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. This is Asian-American and Pacific Islander heritage month. That's a time set aside to acknowledge the contributions of people from these backgrounds to the bigger American story. Undeniably, when many Americans look for role models for educational achievement, many find them in Asian-American homes.

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Oklahoma Watch
10:18 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Oklahoma Reading Retention Bill May Be Heard Monday

Nick Conroy Oklahoma Watch

Students worried about repeating third grade for failing Oklahoma’s reading test will have to wait until Monday for a potential legislative reprieve – a move that would come three days after school districts get the test scores back.

Rep. Katie Henke, R-Tulsa, said she will push to get the bill she co-authored heard on Thursday, but was promised by House leadership that the bill will be heard Monday.

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