Education

Education
10:34 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Students Of Color Don't Apply To Top Schools, But They Should

Deadlines to apply for colleges are coming up - and some experts say a lot of qualified minority students won't be applying to the top schools. Host Michel Martin speaks with Donald Fraser, Jr., of CollegeSnapps, Inc. and Caroline Hoxby, an economist at Stanford University about why some students of color aren't trying to get into prestigious schools.

The Two-Way
8:09 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Ease Up On 'No Tolerance' Policies, U.S. Agencies Tell Schools

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 8:56 pm

Saying that "zero tolerance" discipline policies at U.S. schools are unfairly applied "all too often," Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is urging officials to rethink that approach. The Obama administration issued voluntary guidelines today that call for more training for teachers and more clarity in defining security problems.

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Around the Nation
4:40 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Obama Administration Has Little Love For 'Zero Tolerance'

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 9:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The Obama administration says schools need to rethink their disciplinary policies because they're doing more harm than good. To deal with serious offenses like physical assaults or drug possession, many states and school districts developed zero tolerance policies. But the administration says those policies were being applied too often, even for small offenses. NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports.

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Education
11:21 am
Wed January 8, 2014

New Education Standards Widen Achievement Gap For English Learners?

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:16 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Law
10:40 am
Tue January 7, 2014

New Law Allows Transgender Students To Choose Bathrooms And Sports Teams

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
10:40 am
Tue January 7, 2014

How To Successfully Link GED Tests And Jobs

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we will hear from former Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe. He had a solid eight-year career in the NFL until he was released last year. Now he's saying in a newly released open letter that it was his support for same-sex marriage off the field, not his performance on it, that cost him his job. He'll tell us more about why he thinks that in just a few minutes.

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Around the Nation
4:09 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Catholic School Students Protest Firing Over Gay Marriage

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 5:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The issue we just heard about is also making news in suburban Seattle. A Catholic school there apparently fired a staff member for being in a same-sex marriage. NPR's Martin Kaste has more.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: Mark Zmuda was a vice principal at Eastside Catholic School until shortly before Christmas. The school says he resigned. He insists he was fired. But both sides agree about why he left.

MARK ZMUDA: They said it was because I was married to a man, and violated Catholic teaching.

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Education
3:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

UNC May Have Passed Football Players With 'Phantom' Classes

The University of North Carolina is embroiled in an academic fraud case involving students who received high grades for classes that were never held. Many of those students happen to be football players. The case has resulted in the indictment of a professor, who was a department chair. Audie Cornish talks to Dan Kane, an investigative journalist at The News & Observer newspaper in Raleigh.

NPR Story
4:10 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Financial Benefits Of A College Degree Accumulate

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We've known for some time, that having more education usually leads to higher pay. Well, now a study suggests that the advantage persists even into retirement years, in part because those with more education tend to stay in the workforce longer.

NPR's Ina Jaffe covers aging and she has this story.

INA JAFFE, BYLINE: For people in their late 60's or 70's or beyond, college might seem like a long time ago. But the impact persists, says study co-author Heidi Hartmann.

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Education
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

GED Gets A Makeover To Keep Pace With Changing Workforce

Originally published on Sun January 5, 2014 10:13 am

The GED test is getting an overhaul. The exam has historically served adults who have fallen through the cracks of the educational system. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Anthony Carnevale, director of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, about the impact of the new GED exams.

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