Education

NPR Ed
3:57 pm
Fri May 8, 2015

A Bitter Goodbye: Sweet Briar College Closes Its Doors

The Sweet Briar College campus in western Virginia.
Aaron Mahler Sweet Briar College

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 9:38 pm

For most college students May is a happy month: the senior class graduates and summer vacation beckons. But at Sweet Briar College, a women's college in western Virginia, there's little celebration this spring.

The board of directors says declining enrollment leaves them no choice: Classes ended this week for the year and forever.

Walking through Sweet Briar's campus feels a bit like stepping into a 19th century romance novel — lush green hills, chanting cicadas and colorful chirping birds. But this spring, an air of sadness sours the humid southern air.

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NPR Ed
8:34 am
Fri May 8, 2015

What The Best College Teachers Do

Ken Bain, author of What the Best College Teachers Do.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 10:40 am

Part of our ongoing series of conversations with thinkers and activists on education issues

In a year in which we're exploring great teaching, it's a good time to talk with Ken Bain. He's a longtime historian, scholar and academic who has studied and explored teaching for decades, most notably in his 2004 book, What the Best College Teachers Do.

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Education
3:30 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Congress Temporarily Renews Funding Program For Rural Schools

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 6:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
1:37 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

China, India Surpass Mexico As Leading Sources Of New Immigrants To U.S.

Children attend their oath of U.S. citizenship ceremony at the Birmingham Public Library in Alabama onAug. 14, 2014.
Tamika Moore AL.com/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 2:18 pm

New data from the U.S. Census Bureau indicate a change in the flow of immigrants arriving in the U.S. from around the world and offer a look at what the nation will look like in the future.

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NPR Ed
10:08 am
Thu May 7, 2015

Confusing Financial Aid Letters Leave Students, Parents Adrift

"Knowing exactly how much college is going to cost should be as simple as knowing how many calories there are in a slice of bread," said Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 3:34 pm

Raised in foster care from the time he was 14, Marquell Moorer was determined to go to college, keeping up his grades and working part time at Dairy Queen to save up money for it.

By the end of his senior year at a high school in Milwaukee, he'd done so well that letters of acceptance started pouring in from not one or two, but 12 colleges and universities.

Moorer was still riding high when another wave of letters started to arrive: the ones outlining how much financial aid he would or would not be offered by each school.

And those proved a lot less clear cut.

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NPR Story
4:38 am
Thu May 7, 2015

AltSchool Promises To Reimagine Education For the 2030s

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 12:48 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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NPR Ed
3:19 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Las Vegas: Betting On New Teachers But Coming Up Short

Jessica Adams formerly worked at the Planet Hollywood casino and resort. Now she teaches fourth grade at Robert Forbuss Elementary School.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 6:55 pm

Beyond Sin City's casino strip, what happens in Vegas also includes an education system in crisis. Its schools are severely overcrowded, as we reported Wednesday on Morning Edition. And Nevada and Vegas' schools are ranked at or near the bottom nationally.

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NPR Ed
4:37 am
Wed May 6, 2015

What Happens In Vegas Includes Crowded, Struggling Schools

Students eat lunch at Robert Forbuss Elementary School in Las Vegas. The school, designed for 780 students, enrolls 1,230.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 8:54 am

Las Vegas is back, baby. After getting slammed by the Great Recession, the city today is seeing rising home sales, solid job growth and a record number of visitors in 2014.stru

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Code Switch
3:52 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Ladies In The Streets: Before Stonewall, Transgender Uprising Changed Lives

A view of Gene Compton's cafeteria In San Francisco's Tenderloin District. In 1966, the eatery was the site of landmark confrontations between police and transgender activists.
Courtesy of Screaming Queens/Frameline

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 9:28 am

It was after the bars had closed and well into the pre-dawn hours of an August morning in 1966 when San Francisco cops were in Gene Compton's cafeteria again. They were arresting drag queens, trans women and gay hustlers who had been sitting for hours, eating and gossiping and coming down from their highs with the help of 60-cent cups of coffee.

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NPR Ed
3:33 am
Tue May 5, 2015

The Civics Teacher Who Turned His Arrest Into A Classroom Lesson

Dennis Henderson teaches at Manchester Academic Charter School in Pittsburgh.
Erika Beras/WESA

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 8:31 am

Geography, history, civics.

At Manchester Academic Charter School in Pittsburgh, Dennis Henderson teaches all of these, and a few things more.

"You don't want to sound ghetto when you talk to people," says eighth-grader Malajah Smith, quoting Henderson. "Because people would think, 'Oh, you're one of those black, ghetto kids.' "

"He tells us how to stand up straight and how you shake people's hands," adds student Sharae Blair.

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