Education

NPR Ed
6:03 am
Sat March 21, 2015

With Fewer New Teachers, Why Do Some Stick Around?

LA Johnson/NPR

Earlier this month, we reported on an alarming drop in enrollment at teacher training programs in several large states. Considering the job's long hours, generally low pay and unpopular testing requirements, many teachers in our audience weren't surprised by the trend.

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Your Money
4:33 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Investment Guru Teaches Financial Literacy While Serving Life Sentence

Known by the nickname "Wall Street," Curtis Carroll teaches financial literacy at the San Quentin Prison, helping inmates prepare for life after incarceration. Carroll, however, is serving a life sentence.
Courtest of The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 12:33 pm

Prison is perhaps the last place anyone would expect to learn about investing and money management.

But at San Quentin Prison, Curtis Carroll's class is a hot item. The 36-year-old has gained a reputation for his stock-picking prowess. He's even earned the nickname "Wall Street."

Carroll and prison officials have teamed up to create a financial education class for inmates. He starts off the class with a motivational speech.

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Education
4:36 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

15 Frustrated Students Launch The Country's First Student Debt Strike

California Attorney General Kamala Harris announced the filing of a lawsuit against the for-profit Corinthian Colleges and its subsidiaries for alleged false advertising and other charges. 15 students who attended Corinthian Colleges are refusing to pay back their loans. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 2:19 pm

Outstanding student debt is up to $1.2 trillion, a jump of $100 billion from only a year ago.

This week Senator Elizabeth Warren called the ballooning debt unacceptable and proposed a bill that would allow most students to refinance their debt at government subsidized rates, which are now just under four percent.

Most of the students — though saddled with debt — don’t dispute that they are obligated to pay it back. But that’s not the case for 15 students who attended the for-profit Corinthian Colleges around the country.

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Politics
3:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Fourth-Graders Get Rough Lesson In Politics

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Virginia's Governor Orders Inquiry Into Black Student's Bloody Arrest

Martese Johnson is held down by an officer Wednesday in Charlottesville, Va., in this photo provided by Bryan Beaubrun.
Bryan Beaubrun AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 3:39 pm

Responding to an incident that has sparked street protests in Charlottesville, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe has ordered a state investigation into the arrest of a black University of Virginia student. Martese Johnson, 20, was left with blood streaming down his face after being arrested by Alcoholic Beverage Control agents.

The case created an uproar after photos emerged showing Johnson, a member of U.Va.'s Honor Committee, lying on the sidewalk with uniformed ABC agents crouching over him. Portions of the concrete, as well as Johnson's head and shirt, are bloody.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Questions To Ask About Ed-Tech At Your Kids' School

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 12:33 pm

When a 4-year-old comes home from pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her "choice time" playing on the computer, what's a parent to do?

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NPR Ed
6:08 am
Wed March 18, 2015

Common Core Means 3 Tests In 3 Years For Michigan Kids

As political battles rage over the Common Core, teachers like Jennifer Bahns at the University Prep Academy middle school in Detroit are trying to prepare their students for the first major Common Core exams this spring.
Erin Einhorn Hechinger Report

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 11:54 am

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. Read more about the Common Core.

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Sweetness And Light
2:09 am
Wed March 18, 2015

News From The Charity Stripe

Arizona State fans showcase their Curtain of Distraction during a game against UCLA on Feb. 18 in Tempe, Ariz.
Rick Scuteri AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 11:23 am

It's the venerable custom in tennis and golf for the crowd to be still and quiet when players hit their shots.

Now, since even ordinary baseball batters have some success hitting against 98 mph fastballs with 40,000 fans standing and screaming, do you really believe that great athletes like Novak Djokovic or Rory McIlroy couldn't serve or putt with a few thousand fans hollering? If they'd grown up playing tennis or golf that way, that is. When disorder is a sustaining part of the game, players, in effect, put it out of their minds. Hear no evil, see no evil.

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Law
3:53 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Closing Arguments Underway In Atlanta Test Cheating Trial

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

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NPR Ed
12:33 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Talking About Great Teachers At SXSWedu

"Great teaching is: Finding the pathway in each student to help them to express their own deep-seated intelligence and then push it beyond their expectations. Rosanne Somerson, Rhode Island School of Design president."
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:59 pm

The NPR Ed Team is all about great teaching — so how could we attend the annual SXSW education conference and not ask folks to tell us about their favorite teachers?

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