Education

Shots - Health News
2:26 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets

If you've noticed that kids seem to be better at figuring out these things, you're not alone.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 12:32 pm

Ever wonder why children can so easily figure out how to work the TV remote? Or why they "totally get" apps on your smartphone faster than you? It turns out that young children may be more open-minded than adults when it comes to solving problems.

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Strange News
11:12 am
Sun June 29, 2014

How 'Professor Godzilla' Learned To Roar

For William Tsutsui, incoming president of Hendrix College and author of Godzilla On My Mind, the iconic lizard is an obsession and an inspiration.
Hillsman Jackson

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 3:15 pm

Hendrix College, a small school outside of Little Rock, Ark., is about to get a new president. His name is William Tsutsui, a Princeton-, Oxford-, and Harvard-educated economist, but he's best known for a certain expertise that has landed him the nickname Professor Godzilla.

Tsutsui first heard the infamous roar of the radioactive monster lizard when he was 8 years old, living in the tiny college town of Bryan, Texas.

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Oklahoma Watch
7:00 am
Sun June 29, 2014

Is Oklahoma Spending Too Much On School Administration?

The population of Le Flore County in southeastern Oklahoma is less than a tenth of Oklahoma County’s population. Yet Le Flore has 17 school districts compared to Oklahoma County’s 15.

At Reydon Public Schools in western Oklahoma, the superintendent makes $116,000 a year, including benefits, to oversee one of the smallest districts in the state, at 124 students. That’s $936 per student, compared to $6 for Tulsa Public Schools Superintendent Keith Ballard, the highest paid superintendent this year, making  $260,000.

For years, conservative legislators and others have decried what they say are high administrative costs in Oklahoma districts and schools. They say the state’s K-12 system is top-heavy and wasteful. And they point to this as a reason not to increase Oklahoma’s per-pupil funding to levels found in most other states, and to expand school-choice options such as charter schools.

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NPR Ed
10:00 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Chasing The Elusive 'Quality' In Online Education

You can learn jazz appreciation from a computer. But you'll never learn how to be cool like Miles Davis.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 12:46 pm

Jeff Hellmer is an accomplished jazz pianist who has taught music at the University of Texas at Austin for 27 years. He thinks of himself as more than a teacher, though: "What I would like to do with my teaching is be an ambassador for jazz."

This past spring, in what's become an increasingly common move, he brought his ambassadorship to a wider audience. He turned his popular introductory course, Jazz Appreciation, into a free 10-week online course.

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NPR Ed
3:03 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Move Over Books: Libraries Let Patrons Check Out The Internet

The New York Public Library found that 55 percent of its patrons reported not having broadband access at home.
Jeffrey Zeldman Flickr

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 6:01 pm

Imagine being able to walk into a public library and check out a Wi-Fi hot spot as if it were just another book. Soon, patrons in two major U.S. cities won't have to imagine it.

The public library systems in New York and Chicago won funding from the Knight Foundation to experiment with the idea of hot-spot lending. Both say they hope the move will help them expand Internet access among low-income families.

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NPR Ed
3:15 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Giving Boys A Bigger Emotional Toolbox

Ashanti Branch, an assistant principal at Montera Middle School in Oakland, Calif., leads boys in a "check in" circle at his after-school Ever Forward Club.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:38 pm

This story is part of the "Men In America" series on All Things Considered.

Is America's dominant "man up" ethos a hypermasculine cultural construct, a tenet rooted in biological gender difference or something in between?

Educator Ashanti Branch doesn't much care or, more accurately, doesn't have time to care.

He's too busy trying to make a difference in boys' lives.

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NPR Ed
1:03 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

What Kids Can Learn From A Water Balloon Fight

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 8:30 pm

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Education
10:12 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Hofmeister Defeats Incumbent Barresi, To Face Either Deskin Or Cox

Joy Hofmeister
Credit Provided

Former state Education Board member Joy Hofmeister has won the Republican nomination for Oklahoma state school superintendent.

Hofmeister defeated incumbent Janet Barresi and challenger Brian Kelly in Tuesday's primary election. She'll face one of four Democrats in the running for that party's nomination.

Barresi was first elected to office in 2010 at the height of the tea party movement and vowed to reform the state's public education system.

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Education
4:05 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

To 'Immunize' Kids Against Illiteracy, Break Out A Book In Infancy

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:24 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. Read to your children. This isn't the first time you've heard that advice. But now parents with infants will start hearing it officially from pediatricians starting from birth. The American Academy of Pediatrics announced new guidance today for parents to quote, "immunize their children against illiteracy."

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Education
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says states must ensure progress for students with disabilities.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced what he calls "a major shift" in how the government evaluates the effectiveness of federally funded special education programs.

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