Health

Goats and Soda
2:30 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. "I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic," he says.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 3:29 pm

As a young scientist in Belgium, Peter Piot was part of a team that discovered the Ebola virus in 1976.

He took his first trip to Africa to investigate this mysterious disease. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, he met people who had contracted it. "I'll never forget the glazed eyes, the staring and the pain ... this type of expression in the eyes ... telling me I'm going to die," says Piot. "That I'll never forget."

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Shots - Health News
2:20 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

An App Can Reveal When Withdrawal Tremors Are Real

He's working; really, he is.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 6:09 pm

People who abuse alcohol sometimes try to fake the hand tremors caused by withdrawal to get a prescription for sedatives.

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Shots - Health News
12:38 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

Experimental Drug Saves Monkeys Stricken With Ebola

A Public Health Agency of Canada worker seen inside the National Microbiology Laboratory's Level 4 lab in Winnipeg.
Public Health Agency of Canada/Nature

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 3:29 pm

Scientists are reporting strong evidence that the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp may be effective for treating victims of the devastating disease.

A study involving 18 rhesus macaque monkeys, published Friday in the journal Nature, found that the drug saved 100 percent of the animals even if they didn't receive the drug until five days after they had been infected. The study is the first to test ZMapp in a primate, which is considered a good model for how a drug might work in humans.

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Health
7:58 am
Fri August 29, 2014

$52.7 Million In Tobacco Trust Earnings Certified

Credit Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

State Treasurer Ken Miller says Oklahoma's Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Board of Investors certified $52.7 million in annual earnings Thursday. The money will be used to fund the prevention and reduction of tobacco use and other health issues. 

“We are carefully investing the funds to ensure Oklahomans get the most benefit,” Miller said in a statement. “This certification reflects an increase of $13.6 million or 35 percent over the funds made available last year from Oklahoma’s share of the tobacco settlement.”

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Shots - Health News
2:29 am
Fri August 29, 2014

Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent 'Reservoirs'

New Yorkers can take city-run classes to learn how to make their homes and businesses less attractive to these guys.
Ludovic Bertron Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 7:00 am

New York City is launching the latest salvo in its never-ending war on rats.

City officials are ramping up efforts to teach regular New Yorkers how to make their streets, businesses and gardens less hospitable to rodents — in other words, to see their neighborhood the way a health inspector would.

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The Salt
4:03 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

When Zero Doesn't Mean Zero: Trans Fats Linger In Food

About 84 percent of food products that contain trans fats still carry a "zero gram" label, which may mislead consumers, researchers say.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 1:44 pm

Last we heard, the once ubiquitous trans fats had mostly disappeared from packaged cookies, muffins and french fries.

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Goats and Soda
3:54 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Tom Frieden's Ebola Assessment: The Risk Is Increasing

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the CDC, talks with staff from Doctors Without Borders during a visit to the nonprofit group's newest Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 7:44 am

The Ebola outbreak has crippled local health systems. It's flooded wards with patients, killed doctors, scared away medical staff and forced some hospitals to shut down entirely.

That's the grim assessment of Dr. Tom Frieden, head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who's visiting West Africa this week for a firsthand look at the situation. Frieden spoke to Goats and Soda by cell phone as he was traveling by car from the hard-hit eastern Sierra Leone city of Kenema back to the capital, Freetown.

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Shots - Health News
3:52 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Texas Law Could Lead To Closure Of Clinics That Offer Abortions

The Hilltop Women's Reproductive Clinic in El Paso, Texas, is expected to close if a state law is upheld by a federal judge.
Juan Carlos Llorca AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:31 pm

A federal judge in Austin, Texas, will issue a decision in the next few days about whether clinics that perform abortions in the state must become outpatient surgery centers.

The Texas law is part of a national trend in which state legislatures seek to regulate doctors and their offices instead of women seeking abortions.

The laws are collectively known as TRAP laws, for "Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers."

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Goats and Soda
3:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

They Are The Body Collectors: A Perilous Job In The Time Of Ebola

A team of body collectors carry the corpse of a woman suspected of dying of Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia's capital.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 11:28 am

"When I wake up in the morning, I will pray to God to give me strength and focus," says 21-year-old Sorie Fofana.

His job is collecting the bodies of those who die from Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia's capital city of roughly 1 million people. Before, Fofana was an artist, making designs for T-shirts. The new job pays better — $1,000 a month. But every morning, the lanky, laid-back Fofana has to steel himself to go out and do the job.

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Shots - Health News
3:16 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Scentless: Losing Your Sense Of Smell May Make Life Riskier

If you can't smell this, you could be in big trouble.
Henrik Sorensen Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 1:55 pm

Losing your sense of smell may not sound like a big deal, but it can increase your risk of injury, researchers say. Without the sniffer serving as early warning system, it can be hard to know if the pan is burning on the stove or the chicken has gone bad.

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