Health

Goats and Soda
4:28 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

What Obama Should Say And Do About Ebola

A health worker speaks with families in a classroom now used as Ebola isolation ward in Monrovia, Liberia. Ebola-stricken West Africa needs more health staff and more medical facilities.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 4:55 pm

Tomorrow, President Obama is scheduled to announce a new U.S. plan to help stop the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

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Global Health
3:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3.
Dominique Faget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 6:55 pm

Back in August, scientists reported that the Ebola virus is mutating during this epidemic.

When a virus spreads between people and reproduces, it copies its genetic code in a sloppy way. So there can be unpredictable changes.

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Shots - Health News
3:28 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Key Brain Connection Slow To Develop In Kids With ADHD

Maps of connections in the brain are helping researchers better understand attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Courtesy of Chandra Sripada/University of Michigan

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 5:35 pm

Scientists analyzing data from a map of connections inside the human brain have gained new insights into the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

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Shots - Health News
10:46 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Antibiotics Prescribed For Children Twice As Often As Needed

Drat those viruses. They're the culprit in the majority of children's colds and sore throats.
iStockphoto

When your child has an earache or a bad cold, it's hard to think that there's not much you can offer beyond Tylenol and sympathy. But most of those infections are mostly caused by viruses that don't respond to antibiotics, a study finds.

Just 27 percent of acute respiratory tract infections are caused by bacteria, researchers at Seattle Children's Hospital found. That means that more than two-thirds are viral and antibiotics don't help.

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Goats and Soda
5:18 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Covering Up With The Hijab May Aid Women's Body Image

A contentious piece of clothing: Members of the Iranian women's soccer team celebrate their win over Syria back in 2007. That year, the international soccer league FIFA banned the wearing of hijabs during games. The ban was lifted in July.
Mohammad Abu Ghosh AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:31 am

Like any piece of clothing, the hijab isn't one size fits all.

Women around the world choose to wear — or not to wear — a headscarf or veil for many reasons.

Some see the hijab as a way to identify with the Muslim community or to assert themselves as a human being instead of a sexual object. Others feel the garment strips them of their individuality or turns them into a reluctant spokeswoman for the faith.

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Shots - Health News
3:52 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Patients Vulnerable When Cash-Strapped Scientists Cut Corners

Tom Murphy, 56, in his home in Gainesville, Va., was diagnosed with ALS four years ago. An experimental drug seems to have slowed the progression of his disease, he says, though most ALS patients aren't as lucky.
T.J. Kirkpatrick for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:34 am

There's a funding crunch for biomedical research in the United States — and it's not just causing pain for scientists and universities. It's also creating incentives for researchers to cut corners — and that's affecting people who are seriously ill.

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Goats and Soda
3:28 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Philip Morris Sues Uruguay Over Graphic Cigarette Packaging

Smoking has declined by about 4 percent annually in Uruguay since the country required graphic warnings on cigarette packages.
Matilde Campodonico AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 7:08 am

Shopping for cigarettes in Uruguay isn't a pleasant experience. Photos of decaying teeth, premature babies and gruesome hospital scenes wrap around every pack. In fact, the country requires manufacturers to cover at least 80 percent of the packaging with medical warnings and graphic images.

Cigarette giant Philip Morris International sees this requirement as a violation of a treaty law. So it's suing the country of Uruguay for $25 million.

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NPR Story
4:10 pm
Sun September 14, 2014

NFL Admits Players Are At Increased Risk Of Brain Injury

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 6:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
6:50 am
Sun September 14, 2014

Africans Are Introduced To The Blood Pressure Cuff

Esther Okaya has a health problem that is a growing concern in Sub-Saharan Africa: high blood pressure.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 1:40 pm

Some blame witchcraft. Others think it's a bad batch of moonshine.

But Esther Okaya, who lives in Korogocho, a slum in Nairobi, Kenya, says even teetotalers are falling victim. One minute quarreling with a neighbor; the next minute, dead.

And it's happened to her.

Okaya's husband left her. He took the money for her children's school fees. A few mornings later, her 9-year-old son shuffled home after being turned away by the teacher.

And then she felt it. It was as if her heart seized up. She could not breathe.

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Africa
6:48 am
Sun September 14, 2014

USAID Steps Up Building Of New Ebola Treatment Units

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 10:56 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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