Health

Goats and Soda
2:31 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Don't Pop That Bubble Wrap! Scientists Turn Trash Into Test Tubes

Clear and clean, bubble wrap is well-suited to serve as an array of tiny test tubes. Here a dye solution is injected into the bubbles to measure the hemoglobin concentration in blood.
American Chemical Society

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:47 pm

Hate to burst your bubble, glass lab gear. But plastic bubble wrap also works pretty well at running science experiments.

Scientists at Harvard University have figured out a way to use these petite pouches as an inexpensive alternate to glass test tubes and culture dishes. They even ran glucose tests on artificial urine and anemia tests on blood, all with the samples sitting inside bubble wrap.

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Shots - Health News
2:19 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

As High School Lacrosse Surges In Popularity, So Does Injury Focus

Walt Whitman High School's Caroline Schweitzer runs through a host of Severna Park High School defenders during a semifinal game in Maryland's Class 4A/3A lacrosse tournament in May.
Toni L. Sandys The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 5:02 pm

Sometimes called the fastest game on two feet, lacrosse is also one of the fastest-growing sports in the U.S.

Between 2008 and 2012, kids' participation in lacrosse climbed 158 percent to a little more than three-quarters of a million, according to a survey conducted by the Sports & Fitness Industry Association/Physical Activity Council. At the same time participation in baseball, basketball, football and soccer has either stagnated or declined.

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Goats and Soda
2:17 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Rumor Patrol: No, A Snake In A Bag Did Not Cause Ebola

Eerie protective suits and shiny body bags have fueled rumors about the origins of Ebola. Here, a burial team removes the body of a person suspected to have died from the virus in the village of Pendembu, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 7:17 pm

"A lady had a snake in a bag. When somebody opened the bag, that made the lady die."

That's the beginning of a story that Temba Morris often hears about the origins of Ebola. Morris runs a government health clinic in a remote village near Sierra Leone's border with Guinea. According to the story, somebody else then looked inside the bag.

"And the one who opened the bag also died," is what Morris hears next. The snake escaped into the Sierra Leone bush.

So there you have it: Ebola is an evil snake that will kill you if you look at it.

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Shots - Health News
1:05 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

How A Tiny Fly's Ears Could Help You Hear Better

If you were a cricket, this little fly would make you very nervous.
Courtesy of Louisiana State Arthropod Museum

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 7:32 am

Ormia ochracea is not a very likeable creature, even by fly standards.

This parasitic fly likes to leave its larvae on the backs of crickets. The larvae burrow inside the cricket and then proceed to eat the cricket alive.

But humans who have struggled with hearing loss might soon be thankful for at least one small part of this fly — its ears.

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Health Care
12:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Federal Court Throws Out Health Care Subsidies In 36 States

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 12:38 pm

Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News explains a federal appeals court ruling Tuesday that overturns subsidies provided to low- and middle-income people in states that use the federal health exchanges.

Shots - Health News
11:31 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Appeals Court Strikes Down Subsidies In Federal Health Exchange

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 12:37 pm

A three-judge panel at the U.S. Appeals Court for the D.C. Circuit threw the fate of an important part of the Affordable Care Act into doubt Tuesday.

In a 2-1 decision, the court ruled that the Internal Revenue Service lacked the authority to allow subsidies to be provided in exchanges not run by the states. The ruling could put at immediate risk the millions of people who bought insurance in the 36 states where these online insurance marketplaces are run by the federal government.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Tue July 22, 2014

U.S. Appeals Courts Issue Conflicting Decisions On Obamacare Subsidies

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:03 pm

A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday dealt a significant blow to the Affordable Care Act, when it threw out an IRS regulation that governs subsidies. But before the ink dried on that decision, another three-judge panel hearing a similar case issued a decision that was completely opposite.

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Goats and Soda
3:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten

Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 7:34 pm

Saidu Kanneh was given a hero's welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.

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Shots - Health News
3:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Teens Say Looks Can Be Liberating Despite Fashion Police

Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:43 pm

At Oakland Tech, like high schools all over, passing period is a time for passing judgments.

Aaliyah Douglass, a 17-year-old, gives me a taste of how harsh critiques can be at the school in Oakland, Calif. She starts by evaluating a male classmate who walks by wearing shorts, a T-shirt and Vans.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Hospital Settles Lawsuit By Thousands Of Women Over Exam Photos

The Johns Hopkins Health System will pay $190 million to former patients of a gynecologist who used a small camera to secretly film examinations, in one of the the largest sexual misconduct settlements involving a physician.

The Baltimore-based hospital is settling a class-action lawsuit that includes more than 7,000 women and at least 62 minors; more women will likely register with the suit.

From member station WYPR, Christopher Connelly reports:

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