Health

Shots - Health News
3:59 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Bursts Of Light Create Memories, Then Take Them Away

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 3:38 pm

You can't just open up a living brain and see the memories inside.

So Roberto Malinow, a brain scientist at the University of California, San Diego, has spent years trying to find other ways to understand how memories are made and lost. The research — right now being done in rats – should lead to a better understanding of human memory problems ranging from Alzheimer's to post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Shots - Health News
3:19 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Odds Of Abuse And Mistreatment Add Up Over Children's Lives

Maltreatment in childhood raises the risk of physical and mental health problems throughout life.
RenoCdZ iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 11:33 am

Children who are maltreated are much more likely to have physical and mental health problems later on. They face a higher risk of suicide and of getting in trouble with the law.

But there's a big gap between the number of people who say they were abused or neglected as children and the official rate of annual confirmed cases, which runs about 1 percent.

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The Salt
1:06 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Native Americans Have Superfoods Right Under Their Feet

Twigs and leaves from chokecherries are high in vitamin K, fiber and calcium.
pverdonk iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:42 pm

On American Indian reservations, the traditional diet of wild plants and game for food is increasingly being replaced with a far less healthful diet of predominantly high-carb, high-sugar foods.

Along the way, obesity and type 2 diabetes rates have soared. At nearly 16 percent, American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest prevalence of diabetes among all U.S. racial and ethnic groups, according to the American Diabetes Association.

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The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

91-Year-Old Woman Breaks Marathon Record

Harriette Thompson meets the press at the finish line of the Suja Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Marathon on Sunday
Jerod Harris Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 2:14 pm

It took Harriette Thompson more than seven hours to run a marathon Sunday in San Diego. But that was awfully good, considering she's 91 and recovering from cancer.

In fact, she beat the previous record for women 90 and up by two hours and 45 minutes. She also became the second-oldest woman to complete a marathon in U.S. history, according to the running site Competitor.com.

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Shots - Health News
11:58 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Are Pre-Existing Condition Bans For Health Insurance Still With Us?

Cigna's letter to Julie Rovner saying she had no proof of past coverage, so limitations based on pre-existing conditions could apply. (Highlights added.)
Julie Rovner for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 12:50 pm

"Welcome to Cigna," said the letter, dated May 16, on behalf of my new employer, the Kaiser Family Foundation. The letter also said the insurer was placing me on a one-year waiting period for any pre-existing conditions.

Seriously? Wasn't the health law supposed to end that?

"We have reviewed the evidence of prior creditable coverage provided by you and/or your prior carrier and have determined that you have 0 days of creditable coverage," the letter said.

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Behind Closed Doors
10:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

'Drunk Mom' Tackles New Motherhood And Old Addictions

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
10:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Should Getting High Stop You From Getting Hired?

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Health
10:17 am
Mon June 2, 2014

76-Year-Old Grove Man Identified As Heartland Virus Victim

The tick Amblyomma americanum (Lone Star tick)
Credit Division of Vector Borne Infectious Diseases / U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A U.S. army veteran whose family said he was otherwise healthy was identified as the first Oklahoma victim of the Heartland virus.

Family members confirmed to the Tulsa World that 76-year-old Jerry Lee Mitzer was the second person to die nationally after complications from the virus. The Grove man died May 21.

Mitzner, who normally rose for the day at 4:30 a.m. and worked long hours at his lawn service, was unusually fatigued, [his daughter Melissa] Crowther said.

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Shots - Health News
2:33 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Pregnancy Hormone May Reduce Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

A collage of family photos of Melissa Sherak Glasser.
Mark Turner for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 10:30 am

For decades, women with multiple sclerosis have noticed that they tend to do better while they are pregnant. That has led to an experimental drug for the disease that's based on a hormone associated with pregnancy.

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Shots - Health News
2:32 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Tiny Magnetic Beads Help Tame Severe Reflux For Some People

Ralph Thomas plays the harp at his house in Arlington, Vt. His reflux symptoms weren't controlled by medication, so he decided to have surgery to install a LINX device.
Herb Swanson for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 6:48 am

Call it what you will — acid reflux, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or just plain heartburn. About 1 in 5 Americans suffer symptoms each week. They spend $10 billion a year on medication to relieve those symptoms, including indigestion, chest pain and difficulty breathing. Some even get major surgery to cure this digestive disorder.

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