Health

Health
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

MERS Appears To Spread With Business-Meeting Contact

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 4:09 pm

NPR's Lynn Neary talks to science correspondent Rob Stein about the first human-to-human infection of MERS in the U.S.

Krulwich Wonders...
4:27 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Intriguing Lime-Green Blobs Appear In The Andes Mountains. Are They Alive?

Courtesy of Terrace Lodge

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:09 am

Oops.

Someone dropped lime sherbet on the desert — and it's melting. Who's going to clean this up?

Nobody. Because this — believe it or not — is a plant. It may look like a glob of goo, but it's not at all gooey. It's solid to the touch — so solid that a man can lie on top of it and not sink in, not even a little.

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U.S.
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Veterans Advocate Says He Fears Loss Of Faith In VA

Tom Tarantino, chief policy officer at Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill Thursday about holding the Department of Veterans Affairs accountable.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 5:52 pm

Advocate and former Army Capt. Tom Tarantino says he's worried that allegations over delayed health care will keep veterans away from services.

"Our biggest fear is that there are veterans out there who are not going to seek help because they lose faith and they lose trust in the VA," he tells Tess Vigeland, guest host of All Things Considered.

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Shots - Health News
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Filtering A New Idea: A Book That's Educational And 'Drinkable'

Contaminated water can spread diseases like cholera and typhoid. A new project aims to provide water filters in the form of an educational book.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:32 pm

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Shots - Health News
1:13 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Doctors' Ignorance Stands In The Way Of Care For The Disabled

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:30 am

Something curious was happening in the emergency room. Eight patients had come in within minutes of each other. Almost instantly, the junior resident, two interns and a medical student signed up for all of the them – except for one.

Half an hour passed, then an hour. As the senior resident doctor at the time, I supervised the others as they tended to the middle-aged man with chest pain, the elderly woman with a broken wrist and the teenage girl with a sore throat.

New patients kept coming in, and they, too, were seen quickly.

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Health
6:58 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Measles And Mumps Make A Comeback

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

More than 90 percent of American toddlers get the MMR vaccine. It protects against measles, mumps and rubella. But in Ohio, more than 350 cases of mumps have been confirmed this year. And the CDC has said that measles cases are at their highest in two decades.

To try and find out why and how these viruses are spreading, we're joined by William Schaffner. He teaches preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University. Professor, thanks for being with us.

WILLIAM SCHAFFNER: My pleasure, Scott.

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Shots - Health News
6:58 am
Sat May 17, 2014

High Charges By Doctors May Or May Not Be Red Flags For Fraud

Doctors who bill the federal government for a lot of services may be gaming the system, but there also may be a reasonable explanation.
Aslan Alphan Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

That which walks like a duck, and talks like a duck, is not always actually a duck.

That's the argument the American Medical Association has been using for decades to block public access to doctors' Medicare billing records. The AMA worries that people and the press will misinterpret the numbers when they see how doctors bill the government's $500 billion health care program for the elderly and disabled, and that doctors who are doing nothing wrong could be unfairly accused of fraud.

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Shots - Health News
4:39 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

FDA Dangles Golden Ticket To Spur Drugs For Neglected Diseases

Drew Kilb Duke University's Fuqua School of Business

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:07 am

When the Food and Drug Administration gave the OK to a new treatment for a parasitic disease called leishmaniasis in late March, the Canadian company that owns the medicine got something that's quite likely to prove even more valuable than U.S. sales of the drug will ever be.

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The Salt
3:40 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Will Soda Lovers Drink To Less Sugar?

Samples from Dry Soda, Spindrift, Q and Veri Organic, four small companies that are trying to win back soda lovers by lowering the sugar.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:18 pm

Who's a member of the Pepsi Generation? Anyone?

Would anyone still "like to buy the world a Coke"?

Yes, it's tough times for Big Soda in the U.S. The numbers alone make it clear. "The entire [U.S.] carbonated soft drink category has been down for nine years," says John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest. "Diet [soft drinks] are declining at a steeper pace than sugared [soft drinks]," likely because people are concerned about artificial ingredients.

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Health Care
3:01 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

To Pay For Hepatitis C Drugs, Medicare Might Face A Steep Bill

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

The federal Medicare program for the elderly and disabled will cover two new drugs that can cure hepatitis C, a liver disease that can cause cancer and lead to death. The drugs are very expensive, but they cure hepatitis C in most cases. The government and insurers are concerned about these costs; three million Americans have hepatitis C, most of whom don't know they have it.

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