Health

The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

E. Coli Fears Spark Recall Of 1.8 Million Pounds Of Beef

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:05 pm

Federal authorities say a recall has been issued for 1.8 million pounds of ground beef that was shipped for use in restaurants. Detroit company Wolverine Packing issued the recall Monday; the Department of Agriculture says the beef may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

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Shots - Health News
11:06 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Less Sleep For Little Kids Linked To More Belly Fat Later On

Research suggests that young children who don't get enough sleep are more likely to be obese by the time they hit age 7.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 9:46 am

Ask anyone who's dealt with a crabby toddler at the end of the day: Little kids need a lot of sleep. The National Sleep Foundation says that 1- to 3-year-olds, for example, generally need 12 to 14 hours of shut-eye a day.

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Global Health
5:44 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Mosquito-Borne Breaking Bone Disease Spreads In Haiti

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 9:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A mosquito-borne virus is spreading across the Caribbean. It's called Chikungunya. It's hardly ever fatal but it does hurt, causing severe joint pain. And public health officials expect the disease to eventually reach the U.S. Reporter Peter Granitz takes us to Haiti, the country with the most recent confirmed outbreak.

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Shots - Health News
2:24 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don't Try This At Home

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 8:34 am

It's the latest craze for people who want to improve their mental performance: zapping the brain with electricity to make it sharper and more focused. It's called "brain hacking," and some people are experimenting with it at home.

The idea's not completely crazy. Small jolts of electricity targeted at specific areas of the brain are used to treat diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's, typically with tiny devices that must be surgically implanted.

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On Aging
2:23 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'Silver Tsunami' And Other Terms That Can Irk The Over-65 Set

Senior? Elder? Old? People past retirement age have different opinions about what they prefer to be called --€” so it probably can't hurt to ask.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

About one-fifth of the U.S. population will be 65 or older by the year 2030. NPR's Ina Jaffe covers this population — and says it's often difficult to find the right words to describe it.

"I realized what a minefield this was after I'd been on the beat just a few months," she says. "I did a profile of this 71-year-old midwife. She's still up all night delivering babies, and the headline on our website — and reporters ... do not write the headlines ... described her as 'elderly.'

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Global Health
4:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

How MERS Made The Leap From Animals To Humans

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 5:28 pm

David Quammen writes about how diseases jump from animals to people. He explains recent outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Disease, or MERS, including three cases discovered in the U.S. this month.

Health
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

MERS Appears To Spread With Business-Meeting Contact

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 4:09 pm

NPR's Lynn Neary talks to science correspondent Rob Stein about the first human-to-human infection of MERS in the U.S.

Krulwich Wonders...
4:27 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Intriguing Lime-Green Blobs Appear In The Andes Mountains. Are They Alive?

Courtesy of Terrace Lodge

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:09 am

Oops.

Someone dropped lime sherbet on the desert — and it's melting. Who's going to clean this up?

Nobody. Because this — believe it or not — is a plant. It may look like a glob of goo, but it's not at all gooey. It's solid to the touch — so solid that a man can lie on top of it and not sink in, not even a little.

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U.S.
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Veterans Advocate Says He Fears Loss Of Faith In VA

Tom Tarantino, chief policy officer at Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill Thursday about holding the Department of Veterans Affairs accountable.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 5:52 pm

Advocate and former Army Capt. Tom Tarantino says he's worried that allegations over delayed health care will keep veterans away from services.

"Our biggest fear is that there are veterans out there who are not going to seek help because they lose faith and they lose trust in the VA," he tells Tess Vigeland, guest host of All Things Considered.

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Shots - Health News
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Filtering A New Idea: A Book That's Educational And 'Drinkable'

Contaminated water can spread diseases like cholera and typhoid. A new project aims to provide water filters in the form of an educational book.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:32 pm

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