Health

Shots - Health News
4:08 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

More Health Insurance Equals Fewer Deaths In Massachusetts

Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney signed a health care reform bill during an April 12, 2006, ceremony at Faneuil Hall in Boston. The bill made Massachusetts the first state in the country to require that all residents have health insurance.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Fewer people died in Massachusetts after the state required people to have health insurance, according to researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health.

In each of the first four years of the state law, 320 fewer Massachusetts men and women died than would have been expected. That's one life extended for every 830 newly insured residents.

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Global Health
3:02 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

To Fight Polio Outbreaks, WHO Lays Down New Rules

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 8:31 am

The World Health Organization is warning that recent outbreaks of polio in the Middle East, Africa and Asia mark a setback to the decades-long effort to eradicate the disease. In response, the WHO has declared a world health emergency. It's asking Syria, Pakistan and Cameroon — current polio hot spots — to require all travelers leaving those countries to show proof of vaccination.

Author Interviews
3:02 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Why Bring Up Death When We Could Talk About 'Something More Pleasant'?

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 5:35 pm

When people talk about extending the human lifespan to 120 it bothers Roz Chast. "That upsets me for a lot of reasons," she tells NPR's Melissa Block. "I feel like these are people who don't really know anybody over 95." The reality of old age, she says, is that "people are not in good shape, and everything is falling apart."

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Shots - Health News
2:47 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Colorado Redraws Insurance Map To Cut Sky-High Ski-Town Rates

Telluride, Colo., where the mountains, powder and insurance rates are all high.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 7:08 am

Relief is in sight – and it won't involve a lawsuit – for the four counties in Colorado that have the the highest Obamacare health insurance premiums in the country.

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Oklahoma Watch
9:00 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Oklahoma Looks To Kentucky As Prescriptions Fall In States With Required 'Doctor-Shopping'

The Javoric Flickr Creative Commons

When the state of Kentucky decided two years ago to require doctors to check their patients’ drug-taking histories before writing new narcotic prescriptions, some physicians were adamantly opposed.

The doctors said mandatory checks would cause them to waste valuable time and money running checks on patients with legitimate pain and anxiety problems. They said they didn’t need an online database to help them spot “doctor-shoppers” who might be obtaining prescriptions from more than one doctor.

Then, a funny thing happened.

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Shots - Health News
2:39 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Learning A New Skill Works Best To Keep Your Brain Sharp

Seniors who learned more difficult skills like digital photography and Photoshop showed the greatest improvement in memory.
Courtesy of UT Dallas

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 7:08 am

Brain training is big business, with computerized brain games touted as a way to help prevent memory loss. But new research shows you might be better off picking up a challenging new hobby.

To test this theory, Dr. Denise Park, a neuroscientist at the University of Texas at Dallas, randomly assigned 200 older people to different activities. Some learned digital photography. Another group took up quilting.

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Shots - Health News
2:39 am
Mon May 5, 2014

You Had Me At Hello: The Science Behind First Impressions

Humans make split-second judgments about others based on the way they talk.
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 7:08 am

Remember that famous line in the movie Jerry Maguire where Renee Zellweger says to Tom Cruise, "You had me at 'hello' "? Well it turns out there is some scientific evidence to back this up. People use voices to instantly judge people, researchers say.

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Shots - Health News
4:11 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Saving The World's Babies Simply Starts Before Birth

Shefali Rani Das, an expectant mother in Bangladesh, has given birth to six children (including 4-year-old Suborna) at home without a doctor. Only three of her babies have survived.
Colin Crowley Save the Children

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 10:35 am

Every day, all over the world, newborns die when they don't have to. They die from preventable infections and because their tiny bodies can't stay warm enough.

Shefali, a mother from Bangladesh, knows this global tragedy all too well.

"Whenever a child is born and then dies, we're overwhelmed with grief," she says. "It's terrible."

Shefali has given birth to six children at home in her village in Bangladesh. Only three of her babies have survived the first week of life.

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Sports
4:18 pm
Sat May 3, 2014

Donald Sterling, Philanthropist: What To Do With His Donations?

Originally published on Sat May 3, 2014 5:27 pm

UCLA cancelled a $3 million donation from LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling, because of racist comments Sterling made in a recording. The donation was to go towards kidney research. Host Arun Rath speaks with Stacy Palmer, editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy, about why institutions return money that could still be used for good causes.

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Author Interviews
4:18 pm
Sat May 3, 2014

Drawing From The Experience Of 'Indolent But Relentless' Cancer

Originally published on Sat May 3, 2014 5:27 pm

A few years ago, the cartoonist Matt Freedman started having nagging pain around his ear. He bought mouth guards and tried pain relievers, but nothing seemed to work. Slowly, the pain got worse. In 2012, a bump appeared on his neck. It was a slow-growing, dangerous cancer that had already spread to his lungs.

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