Health

The Salt
2:10 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Here's The Scoop On Jackfruit, A Ginormous Fruit To Feed The World

Jackfruits grow on the branches and trunks of tall trees. You don't wait to harvest until they drop of their own accord β€” by that time, they'd be overripe.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:31 am

It's not every fruit that gets its own international symposium.

Then again, the jackfruit is not your typical fruit. It's got a distinctive, musky smell, and a flavor that some describe as like Juicy Fruit gum.

It is the largest tree fruit in the world, capable of reaching 100 pounds. And it grows on the branches β€” and the trunks β€” of trees that can reach 30, 40, 50 feet. (Trunk-growing is a good thing because it reduces the odds of a jackfruit bopping you on the head.)

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Shots - Health News
11:29 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Love That Gel Nail Polish, But Know It Doesn't Come Risk-Free

Dermatologists say women should use sunscreen and sunglasses to protect themselves from the ultraviolet light used to cure gel nail polish.
Claude Donne iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 8:34 am

Just last week a friend told me about a gel polish manicure that stayed flawless through two weeks of mucking out stables and dish washing. Since I'm lucky if I get through a day without ruining polish, this seemed like a technological breakthrough.

Then I saw a report in Wednesday's JAMA Dermatology investigating whether the ultraviolet light used to dry gel nails causes skin cancer. I decided I'd better find out a bit more before I paint.

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Shots - Health News
9:46 am
Thu May 1, 2014

New Virus Related To Smallpox Is Found In Republic Of Georgia

Disease detective Neil Vora of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks for the new smallpox-like virus in Georgian cattle.
Darin Caroll CDC

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 3:24 pm

Two herdsmen in the country of Georgia have been infected with a brand-new virus, scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

The newly identified virus is a second cousin to smallpox. And, like smallpox, it causes painful blisters on the hands and armsβ€Ž. Other symptoms include a fever, swollen lymph nodes and overall weakness, CDC scientists reported at a meeting in Atlanta.

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Shots - Health News
8:13 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

A cross-section of skeletal muscle in this light micrograph shows the individual, parallel muscle fibers (red). These fibers work in concert to power movement.
Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR ScienceSource

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:35 am

Ron Strang was on patrol in Afghanistan when a primitive land mine exploded.

"When it went off, it came across the front of my body," Strang says. Though he survived the blast, his left leg was never the same. Shrapnel destroyed most of the muscle on his left thigh. He used to run, swim and hike. But even after he recovered, those days of carefree movement were gone.

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Shots - Health News
4:35 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Botched Execution Leads Doctor To Review His Principles

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin issues a statement to the media after the execution of Clayton Lockett. Oklahoma Secretary of Safety and Security Michael C. Thompson stands behind her at the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City.
Alonzo Adams AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 2:09 pm

Executions in this country often draw controversy. But when the headlines about them include words like botched or bungled, the debate about capital punishment enters new territory.

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Shots - Health News
1:04 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Cancer Plus Chemo Might Put Your Job At Risk

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 1:47 pm

Imagine that you've just been told you have cancer. The good news is that it's early stage. Still, your doctor believes a course of chemotherapy would boost your survival odds.

Then this week you read the headline, "Chemo for breast cancer increases unemployment risk."

What are you supposed to do now?

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Education
11:17 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Lawmakers, Educators Target Sexual Assault On Campus

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to start our program today with an issue that has been in the news of late, but it has been on the minds of many college students and their families long before that. And that issue is sexual assault on college campuses. The Department of Justice says 1 in 5 women has been sexually assaulted while in college. So the Obama administration is out with new guidelines for colleges about how to stop this behavior.

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Shots - Health News
11:08 am
Wed April 30, 2014

To Get Help From A Little Kid, Ask The Right Way

Need a hand with those dishes?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:31 am

Motivating children to stop playing and help out with chores isn't exactly an easy sell, as most parents and teachers will attest. But how you ask can make all the difference, psychologists say.

If you say something like, "Please help me," the kids are more likely to keep playing with their Legos. But ask them, "Please be a helper," and they'll be more responsive, researchers report Wednesday in the journal Child Development.

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Shots - Health News
8:58 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Who Really Pays For Health Care Might Surprise You

President Obama said eight million people signed up for health coverage through new insurance exchanges.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 4:55 pm

Eight million people have signed up for subsidized private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, President Obama said this month. Millions more obtained new coverage through the Medicaid program for the poor.

Full implementation of the health law has renewed discussions of winners and losers, makers and moochers.

Here's a corrective to common misconceptions about who pays for health care.

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Shots - Health News
2:30 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Mysterious Kidney Disease Slays Farmworkers In Central America

Loved ones express their grief at the burial of Ramon Romero Ramirez in Chichigalpa, Nicaragua, January 2013. The 36-year-old died of chronic kidney disease after working in the sugar cane fields for 12 years. Ramirez is part of a steady procession of deaths among cane workers.
Ed Kashi VII

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:32 am

Manuel Antonio Tejarino used to be a lean, fit field hand. During the sugar cane harvest, he'd swing a machete for hours, hacking at the thick, towering stalks.

Now Tejarino is slumped in a faded, cloth deck chair outside his sister's house on the outskirts of Chichigalpa, Nicaragua.

Tejarino's kidneys are failing. He's grown gaunt. His arms droop by his side. In the tropical midday heat, he alternates between wiping sweat off his brow and pulling a sweatshirt up over his bare chest.

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