Health

Shots - Health News
5:03 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Why My Wife Didn't Choose A Double Mastectomy

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 6:51 pm

Yet another entertainment figure has gone public with her decision to have a double mastectomy after a breast cancer diagnosis. Samantha Harris is the latest in a series of entertainers who've decided on that surgery as treatment for the disease.

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Shots - Health News
2:59 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Medicare Pulls Back The Curtain On How Much It Pays Doctors

New data show how much individual physicians received in 2012 from Medicare.
Medicare.gov

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:20 pm

Medicare's release Wednesday of records of millions of payments made to the nation's doctors comes as the government is looking to find more cost-efficient ways to pay physicians, particularly specialists.

The federal government published data tracing the $77 billion that Medicare paid to physicians, drug-testing companies and other medical practitioners throughout 2012, and the services they were being reimbursed for.

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11:37 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Easing Oklahoma Family Caregivers Burden Of Long-Term Medical Demands [VIDEO]

Lead in text: 
Americans are being released from hospitals quicker and sicker. That’s put new demands on the family members who care for them. PBS Newshour special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports from Oklahoma.
Cheryl Mitchem never imagined retirement would look like this. When she and her husband, Alphus, stopped working, they planned travel and other adventures. Then, a year ago, a severe headache and a diagnosis of a malignant brain tumor upended the family’s dreams.
6:58 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Lawmaker Blocks Bill Requiring Doctors to Check Prescription Drug Monitoring System

Lead in text: 
Last year, Oklahoma pharmacies filled 9.7 million prescriptions--or nearly 600 million doses--for controlled dangerous substances. Prescribers logged into the Prescription Monitoring Program database 1.2 million times, suggesting that many do not use the system routinely. An investigation by Oklahoma Watch and The Oklahoman determined that the lack of routine PMP checks is one factor contributing to a dramatic increase in drug overdose deaths in Oklahoma.
A bill that would require doctors to check their patients' drug histories before writing narcotic prescriptions was derailed Tuesday by a House committee chairman, but sponsors expressed hope they could keep the issue alive. The bill, requested by Gov.
Around the Nation
4:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Calif. Medical Center Offers Cure To Indigenous Language Barrier

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 9:17 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Salinas, California is known as the Salad Bowl of the World. Nearly a third of the world's lettuce is grown there. Many of the areas agriculture workers are from Mexico. They speak, not just Spanish, but also indigenous languages, like Triqui, Mixtec and Zapotec. For hospitals having interpreters is essential but many of them speak just Spanish. There's one medical center trying to accommodate the indigenous languages. Their approach could be useful elsewhere in the country.

Krista Almanzan from member station KAZU reports.

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Shots - Health News
2:33 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Lessons Learned For 2015 From This Year's Obamacare Sign-Ups

Maritza Martinez worked with an insurance agent at a kiosk in a Miami mall to find the right health insurance plan for 2014.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 10:32 am

President Obama was thrilled last week when he was able to announce that more than 7 million people have signed up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

"This law is doing what it's supposed to do," the president said in the Rose Garden. "It's working."

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Shots - Health News
4:22 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade

Francis Csedrik remembers details of being bonked hard on the head when he was 4, and having to go to the emergency room.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:13 am

Francis Csedrik, who is 8 and lives in Washington, D.C., remembers a lot of events from when he was 4 or just a bit younger. There was the time he fell "headfirst on a marble floor" and got a concussion, the day someone stole the family car ("my dad had to chase it down the block"), or the morning he found a black bat (the furry kind) in the house.

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Shots - Health News
4:08 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Wave Of Newly Insured Patients Strains Oregon Health Plan

Cheryl Stumph goes over paperwork with a medical worker. She finally has health insurance to take care of her family's medical needs.
Kristian Foden-Vencil for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

Millions of Americans who didn't have health insurance last year now do because of the Affordable Care Act.

In Lane County, Oregon, Trillium Community Health Plan is struggling to deal with a huge influx of new patients looking for health care. CEO Terry Coplin says the company figured 26,000 people would sign up in the first few years. Instead, about that many signed up right off the bat.

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Shots - Health News
4:08 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Ebola Outbreak 3 Weeks In: Dire But Not Hopeless

The new normal in Guinea is washing hands with a mixture of water and bleach--shown here at the border entrance of Buruntuma, in the Gabu area on Tuesday.
Tiago Petinga EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 9:15 pm

Guinea is on high alert. At the international airport, travelers' temperatures are monitored for signs of infection. In the capital city of Conakry, people rarely shake hands and are advised to regularly wash their hands with bleach-diluted water.

This is what life is like nearly three weeks after an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Medicaid: A Tale Of Two States

Angela Merten is an in-person assister for the federal online marketplace at Touchette Regional Hospital. But she says most of the people she'll help sign up for health insurance will qualify for Medicaid under Illinois' expanded program. (Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 3:46 pm

There are at least 62 million people enrolled in Medicaid programs across the U.S. today. That’s up about three million since the Affordable Care Act went into effect.

In most states, Medicaid eligibility used to be limited to financially needy people, including some elderly and some disabled adults. The ACA was designed to expand Medicaid coverage to all adults earning up to 138 percent of federal poverty levels.

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