Health

Shots - Health News
11:51 am
Tue April 29, 2014

To Survive A Tornado, First Run To Shelter, Then Grab A Helmet

Tornadoes killed at least 17 people on Sunday and Monday. But some managed to stay safe in underground shelters like the one at right in Vilonia, Ark.
Karen E. Segrave AP

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 2:44 pm

Deadly tornadoes have wreaked havoc in the South, leveling homes and claiming at least 28 lives in the past three days. And meteorologists say the threat of more tornadoes won't ease up till Wednesday.

Getting to a safe place is the best thing that people can do to protect themselves and their families. That can mean a specially constructed concrete safe room, a basement, or just a ditch if you're caught outdoors.

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Shots - Health News
10:11 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Health Law Adviser Says Insurers Will Morph Into Providers

Insurance plans that only cover catastrophic costs don't pencil out for most people, an architect of the Affordable Care Act says.
iStockphoto

As a special adviser on health policy to the While House from 2009 to 2011, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel was deeply involved in the creation of the Affordable Care Act. So it's no surprise that in his new book, Reinventing American Health Care, Emanuel defends the law.

But he also makes some surprising predictions about where health care is going in the next decade and beyond, including forecasting the death of health insurance companies as we know them.

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Shots - Health News
4:18 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Higher Doses Of Antidepressants May Raise Teen Suicide Risk

It's not clear why children, teenagers and young adults would be at greater risk of suicide when they start taking antidepressants.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 5:50 pm

Antidepressants are thought to increase the risk of suicide in young people, but that may be caused by starting them on larger doses of the drugs, a study finds.

Children and young adults who started taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants in higher-than-average doses were twice as likely to attempt suicide as people taking average doses, according to a study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Shots - Health News
2:29 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Tax Breaks Could Be Biggest Prize In Pfizer Deal For AstraZeneca

For now, Pfizer's world headquarters remains in New York. But a deal for AstraZeneca could turn Pfizer British.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 6:00 pm

Pfizer finally fessed up and told the world that it wants to buy British drugmaker AstraZeneca. It wasn't a very well-kept secret.

The New York-based drugmaker confirmed publicly that it approached AstraZeneca in January about getting together. AstraZeneca, based in London, rebuffed the New Yorkers.

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The Salt
12:43 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Got Gas? It Could Mean You've Got Healthy Gut Microbes

Sulfur-rich foods, such as cabbage, bok choy and kale, can be popular with gut bacteria. And we all know how much the critters enjoy beans.
Meg Vogel/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 11:02 am

Not long ago, we heard about a catchy idea for a cookbook: "Fart-free food for everybody."

In theory, these recipes would be helpful for some people — and those in their vicinity.

But being a bit gassy may actually be a small price to pay for a lot of benefits to our health.

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Shots - Health News
9:50 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Pediatricians Say Training Can Help Teens Avoid Knee Injuries

Kelly Koshuta, a basketball star at James Madison High School, Vienna, Va., had surgery to repair an anterior cruciate ligament injured in 2012.
Sarah L. Voisin The Washington Post

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 11:43 am

If you're a teenage athlete, or the parent of one, you probably live in fear of a torn anterior cruciate ligament, one of the knee's key stabilizing ligaments.

A torn ACL often requires surgical repair. But so-called neuromuscular training programs can cut the risk of a serious ACL injury and should be recommended to at-risk young athletes, especially girls, according to a clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Shots - Health News
2:36 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Test First Before Going For Those Testosterone Supplements

Testosterone levels in men can go up and down throughout the day.
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 4:41 pm

If you're a man and you're concerned about low levels of testosterone, doctors say there are a key steps to take before you go with testosterone supplementation.

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Shots - Health News
2:35 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Testosterone, The Biggest Men's Health Craze Since Viagra, May Be Risky

Katherine Streeter for NPR
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 1:55 pm

Men seek it out to combat low energy and decreased sex drive. Prescription testosterone has become so popular that so-called "low T" clinics are becoming common sights in cities and suburbs.

The number of testosterone prescriptions written in the U.S. more than tripled in the past decade. But researchers suspect that much of the testosterone dispensed at low-T clinics isn't tracked, since it's often bought with cash. This unfettered flow of testosterone — officially a controlled substance — has raised concerns among doctors who specialize in hormonal problems.

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Arts & Life
4:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Fair Or Not, Getting Kids To Eat Their Vegetables

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:23 pm

Pediatric nutritionist Dr. Deb Kennedy, author of The Picky Eating Solution, talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about catering to kids who put up fights at the dinner table.

Science
4:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Astronaut Twins To Separate For The Sake Of Space Travel

Mark Kelly (left) will stay on Earth while his brother, Scott Kelly, spends a year on the International Space Station. NASA will test how the environments affect them differently.
NBC NewsWire NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:23 pm

This month, NASA revealed new details of the plan to send humans to Mars by 2030. It's an elaborate and expensive mission, involving a giant deep-space rocket, and roping an asteroid into the moon's orbit to use as a stepping stone to Mars.

But there are still some serious questions about a manned expedition to Mars. Namely, is it safe? That's where astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly come in. The Kelly brothers are identical twins, and the only siblings ever to both fly in space.

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