Health

Media
11:38 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?

"Selfie" may have been the 2013 word of the year. But "belfies," or "butt selfies" are now in the spotlight. We learn more about why they earned a fitness model a spread in Vanity Fair magazine.

Health Care
11:38 am
Thu April 17, 2014

'Miserable' Doctors Prescribe A Different Career

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. It used to be that doctor was a profession many people aspired to - it brought prestige, money of course, a sense of purpose, bragging rights for your parents. But now a growing number of physicians say it's not really all it's cracked up to be.

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Health
7:37 am
Thu April 17, 2014

House Approves Smoking Exception For Oklahoma Veterans Centers Until 2018

The Ardmore Veterans Center, located in the districts of the bill's authors, state Rep. Pat Ownbey and state Sen. Frank Simpson.
Credit Oklahoma Dept. of Veterans Affairs

Residents of Oklahoma's veterans' centers will be allowed to smoke on the property for a few more years under an agreement worked out between Gov. Mary Fallin, state lawmakers and the War Veterans Commission.

The House gave final approval on Wednesday to a bill that would designate all state-operated veterans' centers as nonsmoking effective Jan. 1, but allow the centers to designate outdoor smoking areas for residents until Jan. 1, 2018.

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Shots - Health News
2:29 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Polio Hits Equatorial Guinea, Threatens Central Africa

A child receives a polio vaccine Sunday in Kano, Nigeria. The country is the primary source of the virus in Africa but appears to be making progress against the disease; the current outbreak in Cameroon that has spread to Equatorial Guinea came by way of Chad, not Nigeria.
Sunday Alamba AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Health officials are worried.

After being free of polio for nearly 15 years, Equatorial Guinea has reported two cases of the disease.

The children paralyzed are in two distant parts of the country. So the virus may have spread widely across the small nation.

The outbreak is dangerous, in part, because Equatorial Guinea has the worst polio vaccination rate in the world: 39 percent. Even Somalia, teetering on the brink of anarchy, vaccinates 47 percent of its children.

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Health
4:43 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

Pro-Pot Backers Seek Public Vote On Medicinal Use In Oklahoma

Credit Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

An initiative petition that would permit the sale and cultivation of medical marijuana has been filed with the Oklahoma secretary of state's office.

A Tulsa-based group known as Oklahomans for Health filed the petition Friday for a statewide vote. Supporters will have 90 days from the petition's filing or after the petition is deemed sufficient by the state Supreme Court, whichever is later, to collect 155,216 voter signatures needed to get it on the ballot.

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Shots - Health News
5:03 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Why My Wife Didn't Choose A Double Mastectomy

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 6:51 pm

Yet another entertainment figure has gone public with her decision to have a double mastectomy after a breast cancer diagnosis. Samantha Harris is the latest in a series of entertainers who've decided on that surgery as treatment for the disease.

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Shots - Health News
2:59 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Medicare Pulls Back The Curtain On How Much It Pays Doctors

New data show how much individual physicians received in 2012 from Medicare.
Medicare.gov

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:20 pm

Medicare's release Wednesday of records of millions of payments made to the nation's doctors comes as the government is looking to find more cost-efficient ways to pay physicians, particularly specialists.

The federal government published data tracing the $77 billion that Medicare paid to physicians, drug-testing companies and other medical practitioners throughout 2012, and the services they were being reimbursed for.

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11:37 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Easing Oklahoma Family Caregivers Burden Of Long-Term Medical Demands [VIDEO]

Lead in text: 
Americans are being released from hospitals quicker and sicker. That’s put new demands on the family members who care for them. PBS Newshour special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports from Oklahoma.
Cheryl Mitchem never imagined retirement would look like this. When she and her husband, Alphus, stopped working, they planned travel and other adventures. Then, a year ago, a severe headache and a diagnosis of a malignant brain tumor upended the family’s dreams.
6:58 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Lawmaker Blocks Bill Requiring Doctors to Check Prescription Drug Monitoring System

Lead in text: 
Last year, Oklahoma pharmacies filled 9.7 million prescriptions--or nearly 600 million doses--for controlled dangerous substances. Prescribers logged into the Prescription Monitoring Program database 1.2 million times, suggesting that many do not use the system routinely. An investigation by Oklahoma Watch and The Oklahoman determined that the lack of routine PMP checks is one factor contributing to a dramatic increase in drug overdose deaths in Oklahoma.
A bill that would require doctors to check their patients' drug histories before writing narcotic prescriptions was derailed Tuesday by a House committee chairman, but sponsors expressed hope they could keep the issue alive. The bill, requested by Gov.
Around the Nation
4:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Calif. Medical Center Offers Cure To Indigenous Language Barrier

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 9:17 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Salinas, California is known as the Salad Bowl of the World. Nearly a third of the world's lettuce is grown there. Many of the areas agriculture workers are from Mexico. They speak, not just Spanish, but also indigenous languages, like Triqui, Mixtec and Zapotec. For hospitals having interpreters is essential but many of them speak just Spanish. There's one medical center trying to accommodate the indigenous languages. Their approach could be useful elsewhere in the country.

Krista Almanzan from member station KAZU reports.

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