Health

Business
5:33 am
Fri May 8, 2015

Whole Foods Tries To Shake 'Whole Paycheck' Rep With Cheaper Spinoff

A woman shops at the Whole Foods Market in Woodmere Village, Ohio, on March 27, 2014. The grocery chain has become known for its high-priced food and says its new chain will offer "value prices."
Tony Dejak ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 11:51 am

Upscale grocery store chain Whole Foods (often referred to as "Whole Paycheck" because of its high prices) announced this week that it's launching a new offshoot brand — with lower prices — to appeal to younger, millennial shoppers.

Walter Robb, co-CEO of Whole Foods, says it will be a "uniquely branded store concept unlike anything that currently exists in the marketplace" with "value prices ... a modern, streamlined design, innovative technology and a curated selection."

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Shots - Health News
3:39 am
Fri May 8, 2015

Cancer Spawns A Construction Boom In Cleveland

An architectural rendering of the Cleveland Clinic's planned cancer center.
Courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 4:08 pm

It's difficult to imagine that a seven-story glass building will soon take the place of what's now a vast hole near the corner of Carnegie Avenue and 105th Street in Cleveland. But Cliff Kazmierczak, who is with Turner Construction and overseeing the transformation, points to the gray sky, tracing a silhouette with his fingertips. In two years, he says, the Cleveland Clinic's nearly $300 million cancer center is slated to open here.

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Goats and Soda
7:58 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Scientists Crack A 50-Year-Old Mystery About The Measles Vaccine

Worth a little pain? Back in 1990, a school boy got a measles shot in the U.K., and it turns out, he got more than protection against the measles.
Photofusion UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 7:20 pm

Back in the 1960s, the U.S. started vaccinating kids for measles. As expected, children stopped getting measles.

But something else happened.

Childhood deaths from all infectious diseases plummeted. Even deaths from diseases like pneumonia and diarrhea were cut by half.

Scientists saw the same phenomenon when the vaccine came to England and parts of Europe. And they see it today when developing countries introduce the vaccine.

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The Salt
6:19 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Let's Talk About Death Over Dinner

A recent Death over Dinner party in San Francisco. From left: Tim Ferriss, Laura Deming, Luke Nosek, Eric Weinstein, Mason Hartman, and Max Hodak.
Lesley McClurg/Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 2:50 pm

On a recent evening in San Francisco, five guests gather at the home of Eric Weinstein and his wife, Pia Malaney, for a tasty dinner of seared salmon and a deep discussion of a topic that many people might find unpalatable: death.

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Shots - Health News
4:35 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Are You Sick, And Sick Of Hearing 'Everything Happens For A Reason'?

Courtesy Emily McDowell Studio

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 2:24 pm

When a friend or loved one gets sick — really, seriously sick — it's hard to know what to say. So some of us say nothing. Which seems better than saying the wrong thing, though people do that too.

Los Angeles graphic designer Emily McDowell's solution to this dilemma are what she calls Empathy Cards. When someone is seriously ill, she says, the usual "Get Well Soon" won't do. Because you might not, she says. At least not soon.

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Shots - Health News
4:19 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

DNA 'Printing' A Big Boon To Research, But Some Raise Concerns

Cambrian Genomics says that what it calls a DNA printer is essentially a DNA sorter — it quickly spots and collects the desired, tailored stretch of DNA.
Courtesy of Cambrian Genomics

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 6:21 pm

Here's something that might sound strange: There are companies now that print and sell DNA.

This trend — which uses the term "print" in the sense of making a bunch of copies speedily — is making particular stretches of DNA much cheaper and easier to obtain than ever before. That excites many scientists who are keen to use these tailored strings of genetic instructions to do all sorts of things, ranging from finding new medical treatments to genetically engineering better crops.

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Health
3:30 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Some Very Premature Babies Can Survive With Aggressive Treatment, Report Finds

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 6:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:18 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Ebola Hides In The Eyes Of A Man Who Was Considered Cured

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 9:38 pm

Ebola virus has once again figured out how to surprise and confound humans. It attacked the eyes of a doctor weeks after he had been deemed cured and virus-free.

The doctor, 43-year-old Ian Crozier, had contracted Ebola while working in Sierra Leone and was flown back to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta last September, desperately ill.

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Shots - Health News
2:40 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Screening Rates Stalled For Common Cancers

Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 10:56 am

When it comes to cancer, the right screening test at the right time can go a long way toward catching the disease while it can be stopped.

But many Americans aren't getting recommended screening tests for colorectal, breast and cervical cancer. In fact, there's been a notable lack of progress in reaching national screening goals, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Goats and Soda
12:01 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

On Saturday, The Ebola Outbreak In Liberia Should Officially Be Over

Lucy Barh, head of the Liberian Midwives Association, says of the impending end of the Ebola outbreak: "It is a joy, it is a joy. And I am so grateful to God. The Lord almighty has love for this nation. That is why we have come to this point."
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 2:31 pm

In just two days, Liberia will celebrate what seemed an impossible dream last summer: the end of its Ebola outbreak.

Saturday, May 9 will mark the 42nd day of no new Ebola cases in the country. A person with Ebola typically shows symptoms within 21 days of exposure. But the World Health Organization adds an extra 21 days for extra caution before declaring that an outbreak has ended. So on Saturday, WHO officials and President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf will announce that Liberia is Ebola-free.

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