Health

Health
1:25 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Experimental Paralysis Treatment Hailed As 'Groundbreaking'

From left, Andrew Meas, Dustin Shillcox, Kent Stephenson and Rob Summers, who are the first four to undergo task-specific training with epidural stimulation at the Human Locomotion Research Center laboratory, Frazier Rehab Institute, as part of the University of Louisville's Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center in Louisville, Kentucky. (University of Louisville)

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 3:46 pm

Four paralyzed men who underwent an experimental treatment involving electric current were able to move their limbs and regain some control of their bowel and bladder function.

The revolutionary new treatment is being hailed as “groundbreaking” by experts. They say the results of the study, which will be published today in the journal Brain, are an important first step toward an eventual cure for spinal cord injury.

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Parenting
11:49 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Vaccinating Children: Who Gets To Decide?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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Shots - Health News
11:05 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Global Aid For Health Hits Record High As Funding Sources Shift

A pregnant Somali woman gets a tetanus shot at a clinic in Mogadishu in 2013. The vaccination initiative was launched by the GAVI Alliance, UNICEF and the World Health Organization.
Carl de Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 2:58 pm

International development aid has hit an all-time high, despite some nations dramatically slashing their foreign assistance budgets. As patterns of international assistance shift, an increasing amount of money is being invested in improving health in the developing world.

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Shots - Health News
10:52 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Nevada Offers Rare Deal: Year-Round Sales Of Health Plans

Put your money down and buy insurance — all year long.
Kajdi Szabolcs iStockphoto

For months, consumers have been warned that they have to buy health insurance by the end of open enrollment or remain uninsured until next year. But a little noticed provision of the health law may give some consumers another chance.

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Shots - Health News
10:12 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Avoiding The Nursing Home Ups The Risk Of Unwanted Medical Care

Signing out the kind of care you want can help your family make the right medical decisions when the time comes.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:01 am

Most older people suffer from cognitive impairment or dementia in the year before death, making it more likely that they will get aggressive medical treatments that they don't want.

And people with dementia who are cared for at home are more likely to get unwanted treatment than if they are in a nursing home, a study finds.

That could be because medical personnel are less likely to know a person's end-of-life wishes of someone who isn't in a facility, the researchers say.

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Shots - Health News
9:18 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Mouthwash And Poor Dental Hygiene May Up The Risk Of Oral Cancer

A recent study reported that poor dental hygiene and excessive use of mouthwash containing alcohol could increase the risk of oral cancer.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 7:57 am

Recent research on oral cancer made headlines — and raised concerns — when scientists reported that poor dental hygiene and excessive use of mouthwash containing alcohol could increase the risk of the disease.

Each year, some 40,000 Americans — and upward of 640,000 people worldwide — are diagnosed with oral cancer, which can occur in the tongue, the floor of the mouth, the gum and the cheek. Deaths from oral cancer in the U.S. last year were estimated at 7,890.

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Shots - Health News
2:44 am
Tue April 8, 2014

How Mouse Studies Lead Medical Research Down Dead Ends

I'm not trying to lead you astray. It's just that scientists are not skeptical enough about their mouse studies.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 7:59 am

Most experimental drugs fail before they make it through all the tests required to figure out if they actually work and if they're safe. But some drugs get fairly far down that road, at the cost of hundreds of millions of dollars, based on poorly conducted studies at the outset.

Medical researchers reviewing this sorry state of affairs say the drug-development process needs serious improvement.

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Shots - Health News
5:30 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Play It Again And Again, Sam

Rick Blaine, the sentimental tough guy in Casablanca, pined for "As Time Goes By."
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 7:57 am

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Shots - Health News
3:53 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral In A Bad Way

This one's virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December.
Kevin Winter Getty Images for Radio.com

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 10:54 am

If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let's hope you came home with nothing but great memories.

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The Salt
1:55 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Disease Detectives Are Solving Fewer Foodborne Illness Cases

The CDC is using DNA sequencing technology to get to the bottom of a listeria outbreak linked to cheese produced at a Delaware factory.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 3:44 pm

Recall, if you will, some of the biggest foodborne illness outbreaks of the past decade. There was the nasty outbreak of listeria from cantaloupe in 2011 that killed 33 people.

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