Health

Shots - Health News
2:48 am
Thu May 7, 2015

Losing A Hospital In The Heart Of A Small City

Ann Allen (right) and Marie Birsic (left) take part in a demonstration to prevent the closure of Lakewood Hospital on Cleveland's West Side. Birsic says the neighborhood will "go down into a ghost town" once the hospital is turned into an outpatient center.
Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 4:02 pm

In a leafy suburb of Cleveland, 108-year-old Lakewood Hospital is expected to close in the next two years, for economic reasons. Mike Summers points to the fourth-floor windows on the far left side of the historic brick building. He recalls spending three weeks in one of those rooms. It was Christmas 1965 and Summers had a broken hip.

"I remember hearing Christmas bells from the church across the street," he says.

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Shots - Health News
7:34 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Fla. Governor Leaves Meeting With U.S. Health Secretary Empty-Handed

Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks Wednesday with reporters in Washington, D.C., after a meeting with Sylvia Burwell, head of the Department of Health and Human Services.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:48 am

Florida Gov. Rick Scott paid a high-stakes visit to Washington D.C. on Wednesday, in hopes of persuading the Obama administration to continue a program that sends more than $1 billion in federal funds to Florida each year to help reimburse hospitals for the costs of caring for the state's poor. Uncertainty about the future of the program, slated to end June 30, has created a hole in the state budget and paralyzed Florida's legislature.

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Shots - Health News
3:55 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Staffing An Intensive Care Unit From Miles Away Has Advantages

Registered nurses Cassie Gregor (from left), Camellia Douglas and Mike Montalto monitor patients in intensive care units scattered around North Carolina.
Kevin McCarthy/Carolinas HealthCare System

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 10:56 am

Recovering from pneumonia is an unusual experience in the 10-bed intensive care unit at the Carolinas HealthCare System hospital in rural Lincolnton, N.C.

The small hospital has its regular staff, but Richard Gilbert, one of the ICU patients, has an extra nurse who is 45 miles away. That nurse, Cassie Gregor, sits in front of six computer screens in an office building. She wears a headset and comes into Gilbert's room via a computer screen.

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Shots - Health News
3:47 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

Loki's Castle, the field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, is home to sediments containing DNA from the newly discovered archaea.
R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 6:55 pm

Scientists have discovered a group of microbes at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean that could provide new clues to how life went from being simple to complex.

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Health
2:18 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

CDC Releases First National Study On Hispanic Health

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce, Calif., Sunday, April 29, 2012. (Reed Saxon/AP)

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 2:03 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has completed its first national study on Hispanics’ health risks, disease, causes of death and access to health services. The report shows there are differences in disease and health behaviors such as smoking and drinking among U.S. Hispanics from different countries.

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Mental Health
2:18 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

NYC's First Lady Explains Ambitious Plan To Improve Mental Health Services

New York First Lady Chirlane McCray speaks at an event to raise awareness for mental health at the Empire State Building on May 5, 2015 in New York City. (Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 2:03 pm

When New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio releases his executive budget tomorrow, it will include $54.4 million in new funding for mental health programs across the city. There’s also a promise that that number will increase to $78.3 million the following year.

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Goats and Soda
1:39 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Smartphones Can Be Smart Enough To Find A Parasitic Worm

The posterior end of the Loa loa worm is visible on the left. The disease-causing worm can now be located with a smartphone/microscope hookup. That's a big help because a drug to treat river blindness can be risky if the patient is carrying the worm.
BSIP UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 6:55 pm

Smartphones aren't simply an amazing convenience. In Africa they can be used to make a lifesaving diagnosis. In fact, scientists are hoping to use a souped-up smartphone microscope to help them eradicate a devastating disease called river blindness.

Onchocerciasis, as the disease is also known, is caused by a parasite that's spread by flies. Thirty years ago, it was simply devastating in parts of Africa, like Mali.

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Food
5:35 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Panera Is The Latest To Drop Artificial Ingredients From Its Food

A pedestrian walks by a Panera Bread restaurant on June 3 in San Francisco. Panera Bread is set to remove artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners and preservatives from items on its menu by the end of 2016.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 1:53 pm

This news may feel like day-old bread, but here goes: Panera Bread is shaking up the fast-casual eatery world with its announcement to ditch more than 150 food additives by the end of 2016.

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The Salt
4:57 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Tea Tuesdays: Butter Up That Tea, Tibetan-Style

A monk pours butter tea at the Tashilhunpo Monastery in Tibet.
Antoine Taveneaux via Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:38 pm

Butter (arguably) makes everything better – even tea. For Chime Dhorje, who works at Café Himalaya in New York City, the butter in the cup of tea before him ideally comes from a yak.

Yak butter tea is often referred to as the national drink of Dhorje's homeland, Tibet. Tibetans drink it all day long — up to 60 cups a day, it's said — though they're not the only ones who enjoy it: It's consumed in countries throughout the Himalayas.

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Goats and Soda
12:21 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago

Now that's a big root: Sweet potatoes aren't tubers, or thickened stems, like potatoes. Sweet potatoes are roots — swollen and packed with starch.
U-ichiro Murakami Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 1:51 pm

The first genetically modified crop wasn't made by a megacorporation. Or a college scientist trying to design a more durable tomato. Nope. Nature did it — at least 8,000 years ago.

Well, actually bacteria in the soil were the engineers. And the microbe's handiwork is present in sweet potatoes all around the world today.

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