Health

Shots - Health News
9:25 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Teenage Drinkers Go For High-End Liquor And Cheap Beer, Too

A college student reaches for a beer during spring break in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 11:40 am

For underage drinkers, it's not always about the cheapest alcohol they can get their hands on. Many of them are brand conscious, researchers say, and they're not drinking the same stuff as their parents.

Young drinkers do go for sweet malt beverages that mask the taste of alcohol with fruit flavors; 17 percent said they'd had a Smirnoff malt beverage, which comes in flavors like grape and frozen strawberry lemonade.

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Latin America
4:39 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Why Cholera Persists In Haiti Despite An Abundance Of Aid

A makeshift latrine hangs over the water at the edge of Cite de Dieu, a slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 7:14 am

It's been more than three years since cholera struck Haiti. And the epidemic continues today.

The deadly bacteria have killed more than 8,500 people and infected hundreds of thousands.

Why has the outbreak been so hard to stop, even with more than $9 million in foreign aid pledged to Haiti?

Lack of sanitation, says journalist Jonathan Katz, who has been covering the cholera epidemic since it began.

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Death Toll At 58
4:47 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Five More Deaths Due To Flu

Credit stephendepolo / Flickr.com

The Oklahoma Department of Health says there were five more deaths during the past week due to the flu.

The department reported Thursday that the death toll now stands at 58 due to the virus during the flu season that began in late September. Nearly 1,250 others have been hospitalized due to the flu.

The previous record of 46 flu-related deaths in 2009, the year state health officials began tracking the statistic, was broken in February.

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Shots - Health News
3:18 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Never Mind Eyesight, Your Nose Knows Much More

Your schnoz deserves more respect.
epSos .de/Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 7:14 am

The human eye can distinguish more than 2 million distinct colors. But scientists studying smell now say they have their vision colleagues beat: The human nose, they say, can distinguish more than a trillion different smells.

Yes, trillion with a T.

That new figure displaces a much more modest estimate. Until now, smell researchers have been saying the human nose can distinguish about 10,000 smells.

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Shots - Health News
12:05 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Screening Immigrants For TB Pays Dividends In U.S.

People who test positive for infection with bacteria that cause tuberculosis can be treated before they enter the U.S.
Janice Haney Carr CDC

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 1:39 pm

Hundreds of people with tuberculosis wishing to come to the U.S. have been stopped before they reached U.S. borders, says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Physicians overseas picked up more than 1,100 cases in prospective immigrants and refugees prior to their arrival in the U.S. The cases include 14 people with multidrug-resistant TB, the CDC says.

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Shots - Health News
10:59 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Exercise Cuts Breast Cancer Risk For All Women Everywhere

Researchers found that the more active a woman is, the better her odds of avoiding breast cancer.
Pavel Golovkin AP

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:22 pm

This could be the simplest bit of health advice ever: Exercise reduces women's risk of breast cancer, no matter what kind of exercise they do, how old they are, how much they weigh, or when they get started.

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The Salt
9:33 am
Thu March 20, 2014

French-Fry Conspiracy: Genes Can Make Fried Foods More Fattening

Oh, these look good! But how much the fries hurt your waistline depends not only on how many you eat but also your DNA.
angela n./Flickr

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 12:11 pm

When it comes to fried foods, sometimes I feel cursed.

My husband can eat as many spicy, crispy chicken sandwiches as he wants and never gain a pound. But for me, just smelling the chicken fryer seems to expand my waistline.

Now doctors at the Harvard School of Public Health show what we've all suspected: Some people do indeed pay a higher price for indulging in French fries and Tater Tots. And we have Mom and Dad to blame for it.

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Shots - Health News
8:28 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Cholesterol Guidelines Could Mean Statins For Half Of Adults Over 40

If new guidelines are followed fully, half the medicine chests in America could eventually be stocked with cholesterol-lowering drugs such as atorvastatin, the generic form of Lipitor.
Bill Gallery AP

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:04 pm

When sweeping new advice on preventing heart attacks and strokes came out last November, it wasn't clear how many more Americans should be taking daily statin pills to lower their risk.

A new analysis provides an answer: a whole lot. Nearly 13 million more, to be precise.

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Shots - Health News
4:01 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Ad For Surgical Robot Violated University of Illinois Policies

Doctors perform surgery with the da Vinci robot.
Intuitive Surgical AP

An internal review by the University of Illinois has found that an advertisement in which a university surgical team endorsed a pricey surgical robot violated school policies.

Though the team acted "in good faith," the review concluded, the episode pointed to the need for clearer rules and stronger enforcement.

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Shots - Health News
3:20 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

To Save Her Husband's Life, A Woman Fights For Access To TB Drugs

Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu fell in love while living at a tuberculosis ward in Balti, Moldova.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:13 pm

One year ago Pavel Rucsineanu was running out of options.

Drug-resistant tuberculosis was ravaging his lungs. And the disease had evolved into an incurable form, doctors said.

It's like an "infectious cancer," Dr. Tetru Alexandriuc said at the time. "We have no other medicines" to treat Pavel, the doctor added. Although he wouldn't say it, the doctor expected TB would kill Pavel.

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