KGOU

This is KGOU

How we do what we do

This space includes commentary from the NPR Ombudsman, Elizabeth Jensen, the public's representative to NPR, serving as an independent source regarding NPR's programming.

Reporters and editors have to make editorial judgments every day for which there is no single right answer. NPR West Bureau Chief Jason DeRose and reporter Alex Schmidt made one such call as they edited Schmidt's story about bicyclists in Los Angeles who move in group "trains" for support and safety. Schmidt recorded her experiences while biking with one train and then separately interviewed a driver who admitted to threatening bicyclists with her car.

Glenn Greenwald can certainly raise a ruckus.

The lawyer-cum-journalist who has been a principal conduit for the publication of the National Security Agency documents leaked by Edward Snowden has turned his sights on a recent NPR story by counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston. Greenwald has called it an "indisputable case of journalistic malpractice and deceit."

A puzzle underlay the complaints about a health care story in May from Houston. The reporting seemed gullible, but wasn't. It was in the more recent objections over war reports from Gaza, however, that I finally saw the full outlines of the conundrum—one that has been long nipping at me. You can help.

The issue is one of style, but beware: occasional listeners amongst you may judge differently from diehard NPR fans.

Open Forum

Aug 11, 2014

After a short break, the open forum is back open for discussion. We have updated the format in order to keep the comments section open longer, at least until a new forum is posted next month. While we cannot respond to every comment, the ombudsman's staff reviews the Open Forum regularly. Please note that your comments here may be used in a future ombudsman post. As always, please be respectful of your fellow commentators.

You're invited to use this space to discuss media, policy and NPR's journalism. We'll follow the conversation and share it with the newsroom.

From terrorism to natural disasters, the standard reporting on casualties is often like this by Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep:

"First, we go to Gaza," recited Inskeep. "The health ministry there says more than 500 people have been killed – many of them women and children."

Why, Larry Kalikow of Warrington, Penn, wrote, were women's lives being singled out?

NPR ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos took to Reddit on Tuesday for an "Ask Me Anything" chat. Users wrote in with questions about media ethics, NPR coverage, and the journalism industry today. Schumacher-Matos answered some of the most common complaints he receives as an ombudsman. Check it out.

A brief Twitter storm caused by an NPR education reporter's tweet three weeks ago subsided almost as quickly as it arose. But what has continued among journalists and media watchers has been a debate over NPR's social media policy.

Reporter Anya Kamenetz set off the initial flurry when she tweeted in a moment of frustration:

Margot Adler, one of the signature voices on NPR's airwaves for more than three decades, died Monday at her home in New York City. She was 68 and had been battling cancer.

Margot joined the NPR staff as a general assignment reporter in 1979. She went on to cover everything from the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic to confrontations involving the Ku Klux Klan in Greensboro, N.C., to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

NPR One is our new digital listening app that blends NPR and Member Station news reporting into a rich, localized, on-demand experience. We have been working on this new audio news app for iOS and Android for some time, and now it's your turn to download it and experience public radio made personal.

Fred Rogers of Northfield, Minn, was clearly upset:

I am appalled at the coverage NPR is providing for the current crisis in Palestine/Israel. All of the stories I have heard have origins in Israel and they all begin with a profusion of support for Israel's defending itself. None express any insight about the three weeks of warfare against the Palestinian population that led up to this conflict.

A lot of this is public radio "Inside Baseball," but here's a fascinating piece from Wednesday morning's 'New York Times' about the decision by 'This American Life' to change distributors.

Hundreds of listeners have written passionately to protest NPR's decision to shut down its talk show dedicated to themes of diversity, Tell Me More, come August 1.

As Andrea Zoss of Rochester, Minn, fumed:

I find it shocking that such an important platform for talking about race, ethnicity, and gender issues, is being yanked off the air. NPR needs more programs like it, not fewer.

Leslie Alexander of Fulton, MD, summarized what many listeners will miss:

You're invited to use this space to discuss media, policy and NPR's journalism. We'll follow the conversation and share it with the newsroom.

Please stay within the community discussion rules, among them:

  • If you can't be polite, don't say it: ...please try to disagree without being disagreeable. Focus your remarks on positions, not personalities.

Open Forum

May 14, 2014

You're invited to use this space to discuss media, policy and NPR's journalism. We'll follow the conversation and share it with the newsroom.

Please stay within the community discussion rules, among them:

  • If you can't be polite, don't say it: ...please try to disagree without being disagreeable. Focus your remarks on positions, not personalities.

Kate Carlton / The Oklahoma Tornado Project

Earlier this week, KGOU's Oklahoma Tornado Project and the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center hosted an opening reception for the exhibit "Not Just Another Day in May" at Leadership Square in Downtown Oklahoma City. A few of the photographers who have work featured in the exhibit were there to talk to listeners about the images. 

KGOU staff
Jolly Brown / KGOU

KGOU and a journalism cooperative it leads, StateImpact Oklahoma, combined to sweep several categories of awards presented by the Society of Professional Journalists' Oklahoma Pro Chapter. The journalists' organization also honored KGOU General Manager Karen Holp as its Teacher of the Year for her work as adjunct faculty for the University of Oklahoma's Gaylord College of Journalism, teaching students who produce a program broadcast on KGOU.

The aftermath of the May 2013 tornado in Moore, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

On Wednesday, the Society of Professional Journalists honored KGOU, KOSU, and StateImpact Oklahoma with a national Sigma Delta Chi award for collaborative coverage during the immediate aftermath of the May 20, 2013 tornado that devastated Moore.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

If you documented any part of the tornadoes that devastated parts of Oklahoma in May of 2013 through still photography, KGOU is asking you to share your photos for possible inclusion in an exhibit marking the one-year anniversary.

When Scott Simon, the host of Weekend Edition, referred to the Washington Redskins as "the Washington football club whose team name I refuse to utter," the divided reaction by listeners crystallized a creeping ethical and moral dilemma for NPR and all the mainstream media.

Open Forum

Mar 14, 2014

You're invited to use this space to discuss media, policy and NPR's journalism. We'll follow the conversation and share it with the newsroom.

Please stay within the community discussion rules, among them:

  • If you can't be polite, don't say it: ...please try to disagree without being disagreeable. Focus your remarks on positions, not personalities.

Pages