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This post is not going to name the shooter who killed nine people at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., last week and then took his own life. But that does not mean I believe NPR should not name him.

If you've been listening or reading this website for awhile, then you know that KGOU is actively raising money right now to fund our work into the future. You've heard or seen our pleas for you, the consumer, to invest in more of KGOU's service. Many of you have already answered, and if so, thank you.

But, being the curious type, you have questions. You might ask, "What are they going to spend my money on – beer and pizza? Office chairs with built-in massage? Solid gold paper clips? Limousines driving reporters to news stories?"

When Wednesday Morning Edition sports commentator Frank Deford was off the air for a couple weeks in June, several of his longtime admirers wrote my office with concern, to ask when he would be back. But the emails-- and tweets and a column from a rival news organization--weren't so generous following his appearance this week.

In my first post on this topic, I highlighted some of the concerns that NPR audience members have raised about the network's on-air and online coverage of climate change and the environment. This follow-up post gives my own views and talks about a couple potentially very positive new NPR initiatives.

This office fields listener and reader concerns about a wide range of issues, but, in the seven months I have been on the job, NPR's coverage of the environment and climate change has been among the top topics. It is clear that many in the audience expect NPR to be a leader covering climate news. And NPR should lead; as one of the nation's largest news sources it is only fitting that it devote serious time and attention to one of the most important and controversial issues of our day.

Need help finding an NPR story that you heard on air? Want to contact an NPR show, staff member or the NPR Ombudsman? Have books or music that you want to submit for a review? Itching to pitch a story idea?

Where Do You KGOU? Tell Us In Sound

Sep 3, 2015

Help us put a voice to the tens of thousands of listeners who tune in to KGOU each week. Share an audio "snapshot" the next time you're listening to KGOU, and get our new, limited edition T-shirt.

We've heard that many of you are multitasking when you're listening, whether on the radio or online, and we're curious to know what else you're doing. So take a minute to tell us about it – here's how:

NPR Podcasts Turn 10!

Aug 31, 2015

New technologies come with a big asterisk. We can never be sure whether they'll catch on and stick around for more than one or two seasons worth of holiday promotions. As a media organization, we're constantly investigating these new tools – and sometimes creating them – to make things better for people on the other side of the speakers or screens.

A picture of a gun pointed at a victim, from the perspective of the shooter. The sound of gunshots. A photo of the gunman. Listeners and readers wrote to the Ombudsman's office with questions and criticisms of NPR's editorial choices as it covered Wednesday's killing of two television journalists from WDBJ, the CBS affiliate in Roanoke, Va. A third person who was being interviewed was also shot and injured.

In recent weeks, listeners have written with many concerns about NPR's coverage of Planned Parenthood. Funding for the organization has received renewed political scrutiny following the drip-drip-drip release beginning in July of highly-edited sting videos, which critics say show organization employees selling fetal tissue; Planned Parenthood officials say the tissue has been donated, not sold.

When listeners aren't writing to NPR to comment on a story, they mostly just want to know what music was played between segments. We call those buttons or breaks or deadrolls, and they give a breath after reporting a tragedy, lighten the mood after you most definitely cried during StoryCorps, or seize a moment to be ridiculously cheeky. How could you not play Katy Perry's "Hot N Cold" following a story about why women shiver in the office?

Hundreds of thousands of people around the globe have been on the move in recent months, fleeing war, persecution, and poverty. NPR correspondents have been on the scene, with compelling accounts from the beaches of Greece and makeshift camps in France and, last spring, from Southeast Asia.

 UPDATED Sept. 15, 2016: KGOU has discontinued use of the streaming player described in this article. The current player in use is a product of Triton Digital.  For problems, please contact us.

UPDATED July 7, 2016: Anti-virus software installed on your computer can interfere with the new player. In particular, Sophos, the software used on University of Oklahoma computers, is known to interfere.

Original post:

I came back from a few days away to a barrage of emails from supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Join the SciFri Book Club This Summer

Aug 7, 2015

The SciFri Book Club is back in session! Last winter, we ventured deep into the gnat-infested Amazon jungle with David Grann’s tale of Victorian-era exploration, The Lost City of Z. This time, the only bugs are in the hardware. Join us as we read Tracy Kidder’s true story of computer engineering heroism, The Soul of a New Machine.

When Animals Talk, NPR Listens

Jul 30, 2015

Did you catch what just came out of that critter's mouth? What does it all mean?!

Listen, and listen closely. NPR has been decoding the rich, sonic communication between living creatures: the songs of whales, the call of a cricket, the chirp of a treehopper (a cousin of the cicada). And now you can tune into this wild world of "unheard" conversations.

How We Work: A Week In The Ombudsman's Office

Jul 29, 2015

Editor's Note: Elizabeth is out of the office this week. In the interim, we thought it was a good time to answer readers who have been asking about our process. Here's a look at how we operate in the Ombudsman's office.

In Fall 2012, NPR began gathering data for a three-year research project looking at the race/ethnicity, gender, and geographic location of its sources, the people who are interviewed or quoted on air and on the web site (from officials to experts to people involved in news events, or with opinions about them.) In addition to gathering data, The Sourcing Project, as it is known, has also included experiments to try to improve the diversity of those sources.

David Greene's Wednesday Morning Edition interview with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drew some emails of concern from listeners about its content, but it is the complaints about the interview's form that I want to address here.

Daniel Rosen's was one of a number of emails I received:

Listeners have questions about NPR staffing, some vital missing information in two reports, and a voice that was lacking in the wake of the Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriage. Herewith, some answers.

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