Politics and Government

Middle East
4:41 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Selling Iran Deal To Congress, Kerry Downplays Israeli Criticism

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. This could be a big week for diplomacy with Iran. The U.S. and other world powers are sending diplomats back to Geneva. They're hoping to persuade Iran to roll back some of its nuclear program, in exchange for limited sanctions relief. One key U.S. ally is not happy about that. Israel calls it a bad deal, and is urging the U.S. to stand tough.

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It's All Politics
2:14 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

How Would Your City Handle A Mayor Like Rob Ford?

Mayor Rob Ford talks during a City Council debate in Toronto on Nov. 13.
Nathan Denette AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 2:47 pm

If an American city had a mayor as embarrassing as Rob Ford of Toronto, whose problems with drugs and alcohol have caused an international sensation, it could get rid of him.

Probably.

Recalls of local elected officials have become more common in the U.S. over the past few years.

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It's All Politics
12:38 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Gay-Marriage Remarks Spark Cheney Family Feud

Liz Cheney campaigns in Casper, Wyo., after announcing her U.S. Senate bid in July. Her views on same-sex marriage have recently taken center stage.
Matt Young AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 1:55 pm

A family feud between Liz and Mary Cheney, the daughters of former Vice President Dick Cheney, played out in awkward fashion Sunday.

Liz Cheney, who is running for Wyoming's U.S. Senate seat, sparked the dispute on Fox News Sunday, saying she "believe[s] in the traditional definition of marriage" even though her sister, Mary, a lesbian, is married to a woman.

"I love Mary very much. I love her family very much. This is just an issue on which we disagree," Cheney told host Chris Wallace.

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History
12:25 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

How JFK Fathered The Modern Presidential Campaign

John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, campaign in New York in 1960.
AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 2:33 pm

When John F. Kennedy began his run for the White House more than 50 years ago, there was plenty of excitement and anticipation. He was energetic, handsome and from a famous Boston political family.

But his candidacy was far from a sure bet. At the time, few would have predicted the lasting impact his campaign would have on every election to follow.

Recognizing The Power Of TV

Kennedy made the most of his youth and novelty, says historian Robert Dallek, author of several books about JFK.

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Oklahoma Voices
10:57 am
Mon November 18, 2013

How America Became More Politically Polarized

Thomas Patterson

The political polarization of the United States continues to capture the attention of politicians and political observers.

On this episode of Oklahoma Voices we hear more from Thomas Patterson, Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government on the subject.

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Memorial Institute For The Prevention of Terrorism
10:02 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Oklahoma City-Based Counterterrorism Program May Shut Down

Credit Provided / Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism

An Oklahoma City-based institute that offers free counterterrorism training to police officers may be shutting down.

The Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism has trained more than 16,000 police officers since 2000. But in September the institute lost its federal funding, which it gets from the Department of Homeland Security, and is now in danger of closing.

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Open Records
8:57 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Oklahoma Pardon And Parole Board Trial Postponed

Credit Ronny Richert / Flickr Creative Commons

Trial has been postponed for members of Oklahoma's Pardon and Parole Board who face misdemeanor charges of violating the state's Open Meeting Act.

The board's five members were scheduled to go to trial in Oklahoma County District Court on Monday. But the board's chairman, Marc Dreyer of Tulsa, said Friday that prosecutors and defense attorneys have agreed to postpone the trial. No new date has been set.

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It's All Politics
7:36 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Monday Political Mix: Bitcoins In Congress' Spotlight

Bitcoins have gone from an Internet oddity to much more and Congress wants to understand them and other virtual currencies better.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 8:15 am

Good morning, fellow political junkies.

This week contains major anniversaries of events that involved the first and last presidents killed in office, a tragic link captured in a famous newspaper editorial cartoon. Friday is the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination, Tuesday is the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.

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It's All Politics
7:30 am
Mon November 18, 2013

More Blame Congress Than Obama For Park Woes During Shutdown

U.S. Park Ranger Mirta Maltes stands near the road-closed sign leading to the Everglades National Park on Oct. 7 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 9:17 am

It may seem like a distant memory, but the images are indelible: grizzled veterans tearing down barricades at the National World War II Memorial; armed rangers blocking national park entrance roads with massive signs and government SUVs; and county officials in Utah

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It's All Politics
3:00 am
Mon November 18, 2013

States Aim To Cure Hyperpartisanship With Primary Changes

To fight hyperpartisanship and redistricting aimed at keeping politicians safe in their district, some states are experimenting with new primary voting systems.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:42 pm

Several states are trying to do something about so-called hyperpartisanship by changing the way congressional districts are drawn and the way elections are held.

Their goal: force members of Congress to pay more attention to general election voters than to their base voters on the right or left.

John Fortier, the director of the Democracy Project at the Bipartisan Policy Center, which is working on ways to make politics less dysfunctional, says U.S. political parties have become more polarized.

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