Science and Technology

TED Radio Hour
7:35 am
Fri September 12, 2014

How Far Can Curiosity Take You?

James Cameron talks about how his fascination with the world around him has driven his film career.
James Duncan Davidson/TED Courtesy of TED

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode From Curiosity To Discovery.

About James Cameron's TED Talk

As a kid, director James Cameron was fascinated with exploring the world around him — everything from pond water to bugs. Those childhood obsessions led him some of the deepest places underwater.

About James Cameron

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TED Radio Hour
7:35 am
Fri September 12, 2014

How Do Simple Questions Lead To Big Discoveries?

Adam Savage talks on the TED stage about where curiosity has led him.
James Duncan Davidson/TED Courtesy of TED

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode From Curiosity To Discovery.

About Adam Savage's TEDTalk

Mythbusters co-host Adam Savage talks about three people who inspired him to be curious: his dad, a former Earth-science teacher, and physicist Richard Feynman.

About Adam Savage

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Science
6:05 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Scientists Name Swamp-Creature Fossil After Mick Jagger

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 12:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Law
5:33 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Yahoo Threatened With Huge Fines If It Didn't Release User Data

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 12:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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National Security
7:54 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Court Documents Show How NSA Leaned On Yahoo, How Yahoo Fought Back

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 8:00 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Science
6:51 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Crocodile Meets Godzilla — A Swimming Dino Bigger Than T. Rex

Workers at the National Geographic Museum in Washington grind the rough edges off a life-size replica of a spinosaurus skeleton.
Mike Hettwer National Geographic

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 7:54 pm

There once was a place on Earth so overrun with giant, meat-eating predators that even a Tyrannosaurus rex would have been nervous. One predator there was even bigger than T. rex, and scientists now say it's apparently the only aquatic dinosaur ever found.

The swimming monster is called Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. It was 50 feet long — longer than a school bus, and 9 feet longer than the biggest T. rex.

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Around the Nation
5:27 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

SeaWorld Hopes New Orca Habitats Will Stem A Tide Of Criticism

Visitors watch an orca performance at SeaWorld in San Diego this year. The company has seen attendance slip in the year since the release of a documentary film critical of the company's captive whale program.
Mike Blake Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 7:56 pm

It's been a strong business year for the nation's theme parks, with a notable exception: SeaWorld.

The company, which has parks in San Diego, San Antonio and Orlando, Fla., saw its attendance drop in recent months. The company blames that, in part, on fallout from Blackfish, a documentary film that's critical of SeaWorld's treatment of its captive killer whales.

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Animals
3:39 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Fossil Of 'Jaggermeryx' Found Namesake In Another Stone

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 8:00 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's one thing to have moves like Jagger. I mean, you can learn those.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MOVES LIKE JAGGER")

MAROON 5: (Singing) I've got the moves like Jagger. I've got the moves like Jagger. I've got the moves like Jagger.

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Shots - Health News
12:32 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Some Things You Can Do In Your Sleep, Literally

After people learned to sort words while awake, their brains were able to do the same task while asleep.
Courtesy of Current Biology, Kouider et al.

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 10:23 am

For those who find themselves sleeping through work — you may one day find yourself working through sleep.

People who are fast asleep can correctly respond to simple verbal instructions, according to a study by researchers in France. They think this may help explain why you might wake if someone calls your name or why your alarm clock is more likely to rouse you than any other noise.

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The Salt
11:34 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

To refrigerate or not to refrigerate? It boils down to bacteria, aesthetics and how much energy you're willing to use.
Robert S. Donovan; Flickr / Alex Barth; Flickr

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 7:12 am

Go in search of eggs in most foreign countries and you might encounter a strange scene: eggs on a shelf or out in the open air, nowhere near a refrigerator.

Shock and confusion may ensue. What are they doing there? And are they safe to eat?

We Americans, along with the Japanese, Australians and Scandinavians, tend to be squeamish about our chicken eggs, so we bathe them and then have to refrigerate them.

But we're oddballs. Most other countries don't mind letting unwashed eggs sit next to bread or onions.

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